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Full text of "Yearbook of the State of Indiana"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/yearbookofstateoOOindi 



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iifh'i.^^M.^Q.MMTY PUBLIC LIBRARy 



3 1833 01856 3186 



GC 
977.2 
IN2YE, 
1918 



YEAR BOOK 



State of Indiana 



FOR THE YEAR 

1918 



Compiled and Published under the Direction of 

JAMES P GOODRICH 

Governor 

BY 

THE LEGISLATIVE REFERENCE BUREAU 

CHARLES KETTLEBOROUGH. Director 



INDIANAPOLIS 

WM. B. BURFORD, CONTRACTOR FOR STATE PRINTING AND BINDING 
1919 



^0267 



INTRODUCTION 



The Indiana Year Book was provided for and established by the 
General Assembly of 1917 and the first volume was issued in 1918. The 
present volume covers the fiscal year ending September 30, 1918. The 
Year Book is designed to present in a concise and compact form the 
activities of each department of the state government for the year last 
preceding. Each office, board, commission, bureau and department main- 
tained wholly or partly by state funds is required to submit a report to 
the Governor not later than December 1st, setting forth the duties, func- 
tions, personnel, expenditures, income and the character and extent of 
the achievements and activities of the department during the fiscal year 
last preceding. These reports are then edited and standardized for pub- 
lication by the Legislative Reference Bureau. In the present volume, 
these official reports constitute 736 pages and the remainder of the book 
is devoted to a discussion of local government, including counties, town- 
ships, cities and towns, together with such agricultural, economic, finan- 
cial and social statistics as seem to be of most general importance. As 
the Year Book is designed as a manual of the, state government, it is 
hoped that copies may be made available to all citizens of the state, and 
particularly that all public officials, newspapers, libraries, schools and 
colleges may be amply supplied. Twenty thousand copies of the 1918 
Year Book have been issued, and persons who are interested may obtain 
copies free of charge by applying in person or by mail to the Legislative 
Reference Bureau, State House, Indianapolis. 

JAMES P. GOODRICH, 

Governor of the State of Indiana. 



Ill 



4 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



ANNUAL REPORTS 

Introduction. - . Page 

Secretary of State 3 

Automobile Department 4 

Proclamations of Governor 19 

Election Returns 20 

Auditor of State 57 

Auditing Department 58 

Tax Levies 74 

Property Valuations 75 

Taxes Levied 81 

Bank Department 87 

Building and Loan Department 103 

Insurance Department 121 

Board of Tax Commissioners 139 

Attorney- General 176 

Adjutant- General 491 

Clerk of Supreme and Appellate Courts 192 

Reporter of Supreme Court 194 

Geology and Natural Resources 195 

Moulding Sands of Indiana 196 

Supervisor of Natural Gas 207 

Flints and Cherts of Indiana 212 

Workable Coal Seams and Pyrite in Coals of Indiana 219 

Experiments on Concentration of Pyrite from Indiana 239 

Supervisor of Oil Inspection 256 

Fish and Game Commissioner 258 

Fire Marshal Department 268 

Entomologist 280 

Veterinarian 289 

Supervisor of Oil Inspection 297 

Free Employment Bureau 301 

Superintendent of Public Buildings and Property 302 

Engineer of State House 303 

Department of Public Instruction 304 

Board of Health 374 

Laboratory of Hygiene 391 

Bacteriology and Pathology 405 

Vital Statistics 406 

Public Service Commission 435 

Industrial Board 453 

Boiler Inspection Department 453 

Department of Factories, Buildings and Workshops 455 

Department of Mines and Mining 459 

V 



Page 

Board of Accounts ." 515 

Board of Certified Accountants. . . . / 519 

Highway Commission 521 

Board of Forestry 525 

Park Commission 542 

Board of Pardons 544 

Board of Public Printing: 545 

Board of Industrial Aid for the Blind 547 

Board of Medical Registration and Examination 549 

Board of Registration and Examination of Nurses 556 

Board of Pharmacy 560 

Board of Embalmers 563 

Board of Optometry • 564 

Board of Dental Examiners 565 

Board of Veterinary Medical Examiners. . • 568 

Horticultural Society 571 

Historical Commission 573 

Historical Society . 575 

Academy of Science 579 

State Council of Defense 581 

Selective Military Service 599 

National Army Cantonments 620 

National Guard Cantonments . 620 

State Library 621 

Public Library Commission 630 

Law Library 667 

Indiana University 668 

Purdue University . 677 

State Normal School 692 

Charter Board 701 

Anatomical Board \ . . . 701 

Board of Education 701 

Board of School Book Commissioners 702 

Board of Truancy 702 

Teachers' Training Board 702 

Library Board 702 

Teachers' Retirement Fund 703 

Board of Finance , 703 

Board of Public Buildings and Property. . 703 

Board to Reassign Rooms in State House 703 

Voting Machine Commission 704 

Board of Canvassers 704 

Soldiers' and Sailors' Monument 704 

Corydon Capitol Building Commission 705 

Tippecanoe Battleground 705 

Nancy Hanks Memorial Commission 706 

Battle Flags Commission 706 

Board of Classification of Industries 706 



Page 

Legislative Visiting Committee 707 

Joint Purchasing Committee 707 

Emergency and Contingent Fund Committee 707 

Mental Defectives Committee 708 

Board of State Charities 708 

State Officers, Boards and Commissions 737 

Facts About Indiana 749 

Population of Indiana 751 

Congressional Apportionment 754 

Congressional Delegation 755 

Legislative Apportionment 756 

Members Legislature of 1919 758 

Sessions of General Assembly 762 

Taking Effect of Statutes ^Z. 764 

Appropriations for State Government 764 

Enumeration of Voters 771 

Constitutional Convention of 1816 773 

Constitutional Convention of 1850 773 

Constitution of Indiana 774 

Amendments to Indiana Constitution 788 

Cost of Constitutional Conventions 791 

Pending Federal Amendment 791 

State Flag • 792 

Legal Holidays 792 

State Song 793 

State Flower 793 

County Government 793 

Organization of Counties 794 

County Finances 803 

Road Statistics 806 

Land Transfers, Deeds, Mortgages, Etc 812 

Agricultural Statistics 816 

Financial Statistics of Counties and Townships 831 

Township Government 848 

City Government 849 

Indiana Mayors 856 

City Clerks and City Judges 858 

City Officers 860 

Financial Statistics of Cities 861 

Town Government 863 

Population and Finances of Towns 864 

Judiciary 870 

Circuit Judges and Prosecuting Attorneys 872 

Superior Judges 873 

Registration and Election 876 

Electoral and Popular Vote for President 879 

Presidential Vote, 1916 881 

Primary Elections 883 



Vlll 

Page 

Political Party Organizations 895 

Republican State Convention 899 

Republican State Platform ^ 901 

Democratic State Convention 905 

Democratic State Platform , 907 

Prohibition State Ticket and Platform 911 

Socialist State Ticket and Platform 914 

Republican National Committee 915 

Congressional Socialist Platform 916 

Prohibition National Committee 928 

Naturalization and Citizenship 925 

Births, Deaths, Marriages, Divorces, Etc 934 

Marriages and Divorces 938 

Coroners' Reports 941 

Retail Liquor Licenses 945 

Referendum Questions , 948 

Private Schools 949 

Colleges of Indiana 950 

Post Offices in Indiana , 951 

Necrology 968 

List of Territorial and State Governors 972 

List of Lieutenant-Governors 977 

Newspapers of Indiana 983 

National War Work Council 1006 

Contributions to War Work 1009 

(1) Liberty Loan 1009 

(2) War Savings Stamps 1010 

(3) Y. M. C. A 1012 

(4) Knights of Columbus , 1012 

(5) Jewish Relief , 1012 

Student Army Training Corps 1013 

Chronological History of Indiana 1013 

Report of Treasurer of State 1025 



ANNUAL REPORTS 



State Officers, Departments, 

Bureaus, Boards and 

Commissions 



FOR THE 



Fiscal Year Ending September 30,11918 



REPORT OF SECRETARY OF STATE 



OFFICERS AND ASSISTANTS 

WILLIAM A. ROACH, Secretary of State. 

P. H. WOLFARD, Deputy Secretary of State. 

HOWARD D. McClelland, Assistant Deputy Secretary of State. 

MARY L. LESLEY, Clerk and Stenographer. 

AUTOMOBILE DEPARTMENT 

P. H. WOLFARD, Registrar of Automobiles. 

M. W. PERSHING, Assistant Registrar. 

WM. H, PEIRCE, Bookkeeper. 

FRANK A. RICHARDS, Shipping Clerk. 

FRANK DENIUS, Clerk. 

ROBERT C. McGREW, Clerk. 

HAROLD C. OWENS, Clerk. 

HARRY BRATTUnT, Clefk. 

JAMES I. EDSON, Clerk. 

JOSEPH BROYLES, Clerk. 

FANNIE STEVENSON, Clerk. 

MARY A. LEONARD, Cashier. 

INEZ OWENS, Assistant Cashier. 

HELEN C. RUEHL, Stenographer. 

GLADYS M. JONES, Stenographer. 

DUTIES AND FUNCTIONS 

The constitution of 1816 provided that "A Secretary of State shall 
be chosen by the joint ballot of both houses of the General Assembly, 
and be commissioned by the Governor for four years, or until a new 
secretary be chosen and qualified. He shall keep a fair register and at- 
test all the official acts and proceedings of the Governor, and shall, when 
required, lay the same and all papers, minutes, and vouchers relative 
thereto, before either house of the General Assembly, and shall perform 
such other duties as may be enjoined him by law." 

The constitution of 1851 provided that the Secretary of State should 
be elected biennially by the voters of the State. The duties enjoined 
upon the office by succeeding legislatures have become numerous. The 
Secretary of State is ex-officio president of the State Board of Tax Com- 
missioners, secretary of the State Board of Public Printing, member of 
the Bank Charter Board, a member of the Board of Public Buildings and 
Grounds, and Registrar of Motor Vehicles. 

The classification of the fees received by this office, as set out below, 
for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1918, will serve as an index to 
the variety of duties of the Secretary of State, and the amounts will 
represent the volume of business transacted. 

(3) 



4 ' Year Book 

Filing Domestic Corporation Papers $138,136 70 

Filing Foreign Corporation Papers 24,262 61 

Issuing Notary Public Commissions, @ $1 each 4,737 00 

Attesting Official Commissions, @ 60c each 79 20 

Issuing Warrants on Requisitions, @ $3 each 186 00 

Recording Trade Marks, @ $2.50 each 55 50 

Issuing Fertilizer Licenses, @ $1 each 84 00 

Making Certified Copies of Records 883 20 

Filing Annual Reports (Domestic) @ 50c each 3,470 50 

Filing Annual Reports (Foreign) @ $1 each 639 00 

Sale of Court Reports 2,907 00 

Notary Public Fees 5,527 75 

Sale of Acts @ 50c per volume 68 00 

Detective Licenses 850 00 

Equipment Agreements and Miscellaneous Certificates 813 60 

Total $182,700 06 

The following table represents the appropriations made by the Legis- 
lature for the expenses of the office and the amounts expended against 
such appropriations: 

Appropriation Expense Balance 

Salary Secretary of State $6,500 00 $6,500 00 

Salary Deputy Secretary of State 2,400 00 2,400 00 

Salary Assistant Deputy 1,800 00 1,800 00 

Salary Clerk and Stenographer 1,020 00 1,020 00 

Office Expense 500 00 144 47 $355 53 

Distribution Public Documents 250 00 250 00 

Distribution Court Reports 250 00 87 00 163 00 

Special Recording 600 00 242 50 357 50 

$13,320 00 $12,443 97 $876 03 

There has been a decrease in domestic corporation fees. The fact 
that the Federal Government, through the Capital Issues Committee of 
the Federal Finance Corporation, has assumed and exercised supervision 
over the capitalization of private corporations during the period of the 
war, has been responsible for part of this decrease. The corporations 
that were not engaged primarily in war work have not expanded their 
capitalization as they might have done in normal times, which fact also 
accounts for part of the decrease. 

REGISTRATION OF MOTOR VEHICLES 

Every person who is the owner of a motor vehicle is required to 
register with the Secretary of State by making application on blanks 
furnished for that purpose, giving his name, post office and street or 
rural address and the county in which he lives. He must give the name 
of his motor vehicle, year in which it was made, model, factory number, 
number of cylinders, size of bore and horsepower. He is then required 
to sign the application and have his signature acknowledged by a notary 
public or other officer authorized to administer oaths. Attached to the 
application is a memorandum which is filed in the archives of the auto- 
mobile department of the office of Secretary of State, by counties, for 
the use of the public. A certificate is given the owner as an evidence 
of his ownership of the license. Upon paying the proper fee, metal 



Secretary of State 5 

license plates are furnished the owner, which must be displayed on both 
the front and rear of his car. All licenses expire on the 31st day of 
December and must be renewed annually. License numbers, preceded by 
the letter "M," are issued to dealers and manufacturers, and may be 
used on all cars in connection with their business for demonstrating pur- 
poses only and not for private use. 

If an owner of an automobile sells his car, he should remove the 
license plates, and the purchaser makes an application for a new license. 
The owner of the license plates may transfer them to a new car belong- 
ing to him; however, if he does not wish to use them on another car, he 
may return them to the office of the Secretary of State, by making the 
proper application, and receive a rebate for the unused portion of the 
year. Under no circumstances can license plates be transferred from one 
person to another. In case an owner wishes to transfer his license from 
a lower to a higher horsepower, he must pay the difference between the 
lower and the higher horsepower rate. No rebate is made when trans- 
ferring from a higher to a lower horsepower. 

In case a license plate is lost, stolen, mutilated or destroyed, a 
duplicate may be secured by making application on a proper form and 
the payment of a fee of $1.00. 

Licenses are issued for motorcycles, the purchaser giving a descrip- 
tion of his cycle, similar to that given for a motor vehicle, proper forms 
being furnished for that purpose. 

Chauffeurs' licenses are issued by making proper application, the ap- 
plicant giving a description of himself, making statements as to his 
qualifications, furnishing two photographs, and giving two certificates as 
to his character, by two disinterested persons, together with an ac- 
knowledgment before a proper officer as to his signature. 

The following table gives the schedule of annual registration and li- 
cense fees charged for the various horsepower and classes of motor 
vehicles for use on the public highways : 

ANNUAL REGISTRATION AND UCENSE FEES 

25 Horsepower or less $5 00 

40 Horsepower and more than 25 8 00 

50 Horsepower and more than 40 15 00 

More than 50 Horsepower 20 00 

Manufacturer's and Dealer's License 25 00 

Duplicate Numbers for Manufacturer's and Dealer's, per set 1 00 

Duplicate Numbers for owners lost license plates - 1 00 

Trucks, Delivery Cars, and all cars used exclusively for commercial purposes 5 00 

Electric pleasure cars 3 00 

Motorcycles 2 00 

Chauffeur's License 2 00 

The above fees apply to all applications made prior to August 1st 
of each year. After August 1st the license fee is one-half of the above 
until the end of the year. 

DISTRIBUTION OF AUTOMOBILE FUNDS 

All money received by the Secretary of State as fees for registering 
Motor Vehicles, Motor Cycles and licensing chauffeurs is set apart in the 



6 Year Book 

State Treasury as a Road Fund and after deducting all expenses of the 
ofRce incurred in procuring and delivering registration certificates and 
number plates and other incidental expenses, is paid to the several 
counties of the State on January 1st and July 1st of each year, on the 
following basis: one- third is divided equally among the counties, one- 
third is divided among the counties in the proportion which the num- 
ber of miles of free gravel or macadam roads in the county bears to the 
total number of miles of such roads in the State, and one- third is divided 
among the counties on the basis of the amount received from the coun- 
ties in registration License Fees. 

MOTOR VEHICLE STATISTICS 

The following tables are designed to exhibit the classified receipts 
of the automobile department from the various sources designated, and 
the semi-annual distribution to the counties on the bases prescribed by 
law. 



Secretary of State 



(1) Classified Receipts— July 1st to December 31 st, 1917 



CouirrxES 


Motor 
Vehicles 


Motor- 
cycles 


Chauffeurs 


Duplicates 


Transfers 


Dealers 


Total 


Adams 


$637 00 

2,669 00 

630 50 

447 50 

356 00 

955 50 

99 50 
507 50 
900 50 
354 00 

713 50 

1,238 50 

90 00 
500 00 
398 00 

601 00 
926 00 

1,672 00 
256 50 

1,724 00 

570 00 
426 50 
821 00 
334 00 
748 00 

753 50 

1,562 50 
881 50 
964 00 
604 50 

315 00 

846 00 

1,159 00 

1,279 50 

999 50 

379 00 
431 OO 
694 00 
286 00 
162 00 

946 00 
1,305 50 
1,031 50 

509 50 
3,371 00 

1,125 00 

506 00 

1,978 50 

9,482 00 

963 00 

91 50 
930 50 
418 50 

964 00 
527 50 

377 00 
638 50 
102 50 
251 50 
240 50 

527 50 
99 50 
323 50 
738 50 
S88 50 


131 00 
99 00 
900 
400 
10 00 

17 00 

200 

5 00 
27 00 

400 

17 00 

17 00 
1 00 

6 00 
13 00 

600 
23 00 

57 00 




$4 00 
51 00 

2 00 
6 00 

3 00 

5 00 

2 00 

3 00 
16 00 

1 00 

3 00 

4 00 


$9 00 
48 00 
17 00 

5 50 
4 00 

16 50 
1 00 

6 00 
8 00 
200 

1 00 
19 00 




$681 00 


Allen 

Bartholomew 


$122 00 
1 00 


$12 50 


3,001 50 
659 50 


Benton 




463 00 


Blackford 


1 00 
400 




374 00 


Boone 




998 00 


Brown 




104 50 


CarroU 







521 50 


Cass 

Clark 


12 00 
10 00 

1 00 

700 


37 50 


1,001 00 
371 00 


Clay 

Clinton 

Crawford 


■■i2'56' 


735 50 

1,298 00 

91 00 


Daviess 




i 66 

1 00 

2 00 

7 00 
36 00 


2 00 

2 00 

5 00 

7 50 
37 00 

1 00 
2.5 00 

12 50 

3 00 
700 

1.5 00 
55 50 

11 50 

37 50 

4 00 
9 50 

22 50 

4 00 
30 50 
16 50 
22 50 
11 00 

4 00 
11 00 
10 50 


uhb" 

12 50 


509 00 


Dearborn 

Decatur 

Dekalb 


1 00 

200 

1 00 
52 00 


427 50 

628 50 
964 50 


Delaware 




1,854 00 


Dubois 




257 50 


Elkhart 


57 00 

17 00 
7 00 
9 00 
200 

25 00 

10 00 
67 00 
10 00 
13 00 
9 00 

1 00 
15 00 
25 00 
48 00 
24 00 

600 
7 00 
34 00 
1 00 
5 00 

5 00 
19 00 
33 00 
10 00 
238 00 

62 00 

400 

51 00 

283 00 

18 00 


40 00 


25 00 
200 




1,871 00 
601 50 


Fayette 




Floyd 


3 00 
27 00 


12*50 * 

*"2506" 

12 50 
12 50 
12 50 


439 50 


Fountain 

Franklin 


400" 

1 00 
14 00 

5 00 

18 00 

6 00 

7 00 
5 00 

1 00 
5 00 

2 00 
12 00 
10 00 


880 50 
342 00 


Fulton 

Gibson 

Grant 

Greene 

Hamilton 


36 00 

1 00 

12 00 

13 00 
18 00 

2 00 


903 50 

793 50 
1,709 50 

927 00 
1,011 50 


Hancock 


12 50 


655 50 
321 00 


Hendricks 


6 00 

56 00 

6 00 

400 

3 00 

4 00 
9 00 
3 00 
200 

400 
36 00 

1 00 
«2 00 
77 00 

32 00 

2 00 
30 00 

235 00 
12 00 




902 50 


Henry 

Howard 

Huntington 


12 50 
25 00 


1,271 00 
1,393 00 
1,048 50 


Jackson 




392 00 


Jasper 

Jay 


2 00 
7 00 

4 00 
1 00 

5 00 

IS 00 
300 
4 00 

17 00 

11 00 
1 00 

35 00 
306 00 

12 00 


12 50 


467 50 
754 50 


Jefferson .... t ... . 


12 50 


306 50 




1 00 

23 50 
16 00 
10 00 
5 00 
26 00 

12 50 

8 00 

23 00 

216 50 

12 00 


171 00 


Toliii.vin 




983-50 


Knox 

Kosciusko 


12 50 


1,407 00 
1 078 50 


{ie°'^:::;::::: 

Laporte . . 


. 


'530 50 


25 00 
12 50 


3,754 00 

1,255 00 
521 00 


Madison 


"ioo 00 ' 


2 IP 50 


Marion 

Marshall 


10,622 50 
1,017 00 

91 50 


Martin 




■mi 1 


22 00 
10 00 

17 00 
700 

3 00 

18 00 


32 66 
4 00 
9 00 
2 00 


20 00 
.3 00 
,600 
L4 00 

2 00 
l3 00 


32 50 
700 
12 00 
10 50 

6 00 
600 

1 00 

3 50 

4 00 

5 00 

2 00 
200 

7 00 
10 00 


12 50 
■■2506" 


1,049 50 
442 50 

1,033 00 
551 00 




388 00 


Noble 

Ohio. 


200 


12 50 


680 00 
101 50 


Orange ' 


100 
200 

400 


3 00 






2o9 00 


Owen 


1 00 

1 00 
1 00 
600 
3 00 
200 


12 50 
25 00 

"25 oo" 


260 00 


Parke i 




562 50 


Perry 




102 50 


Pike I 


1 00 
12 00 
200 





357 50 


Porter i 


16 00 
13 00 


776 SO 


po-cy ::; 




614 50 



Year Book 



Classified Receipts — Continued 



COUNTIKS 


Motor 
Vehicles 


Motor- 
cycles 


Chauffeurs 


Duplicates 


Transfers 


Dealers 


Total 


Pulaski 


452 50 
691 50 
892 00 
425 00 
951 50 

95 50 

920 00 

249 00 

333 50 

2,398 00 

579 00 
909 50 
167 00 
1,423 00 
668 00 

327 00 
1,318 50 

805 50 
2,260 50 

906 00 
372 00 
342 00 
272 50 

1,200 00 
690 50 
657 00 
667 50 


$10 00 
9 00 
15 00 
6 00 
15 00 






$13 50 

5 00 

6 00 
1 00 

28 50 




$476 00 


Putnam 




$5 00 
7 00 




710 50 




$3 00 
i 00 


$25 00 
"2506" 


948 00 


Ripley 


433 00 


Rush 


6 00 


1,026 00 ^ 
95 50 


Scott 




Shelby 


17 00 
2 00 

8 00 
86 00 

11 00 

9 00 
2 00 

38 00 
6 00 

2 00 
20 00 

15 00 
71 00 

13 00 
6 00 
1 00 
6 00 

41 00 

16 00 
6 00 
8 00 


6 00 


200 


14 00 

1 00 

2 00 
53 50 

3 00 
800 
2 00 

40 00 

6 00 

7 00 
25 50 
16 50 
36 50 

28 50 
200 
14 50 

4 00 

19 50 

5 00 
7 00 

11 50 


12 50 


971 50 


Spencer 


252 00 


Starke 








343 50 


St. Joseph 


146 00 

2 00 
2 00 

1 00 
44 00 

2 00 


49 00 

4 00 
9 00 
1 00 

5 00 
1 00 


37 50 


2,770 00 
599 00 


Steuben 


Sullivan 

Switzerland 

Tippecanoe 

Tipton 

Union . . 


12 50 
12 50 
12 50 
12 50 

12 50 
25 00 


950 00 

185 50 

1,562 50 

695 50 

348 50 


Vanderburgh 

Vermillion . 


52 66 
5 00 
19 00 

25 00 
3 00 
2 00 


5 00 
3 00 
13 00 

24 00 
1 00 
1 00 


1,446 00 
845 00 


Vigo 




2,400 00 


Wabash 

Warren 


12 50 


1,009 00 
384 00 


Warrick 




360 50 


Washington 




282 50 


Wayne 

Welis. . . 


34 00 


23 00 
5 00 
1 00 
3 00 


25 00 


1,342 50 
716 50 


White 

Whitley 


1 00 
1 00 


12 50 


684 50 
691 00 






Total 


$78,904 50 


$2,001 00 


$1,319 00 


$910 00 


$1,317 50 


$737 50 


185,189 50 



Secretary of State 



(2) Adjusting Entries— Distribution, July T) December, 1917 



COTTNTIES 



Road 
Mile. 



Fees 


Rebates 


Fees I.es8 


Dop. 


Net 


Expense 


Paid 




Rebates 


Interest 


Receipts 


$681 00 


$1 25 


$679 75 


?47 34 


$727 09 


$141 43 


3,001 50 


20 22 


2,981 28 


207 62 


3,188 90 


623 34 


659 50 


2 08 


657 42 


45 78 


703 20 


136 96 


463 00 


2 49 


450 51 


32 07 


492 58 


93 15 


374 00 


3 32 


370 68 


25 81 


396 49 


77 67 


998 00 


13 56 


984 44 


68 58 


1,053 00 


207 20 


104 50 




104 50 


7 28 


111 78 


21 70 


521 50 


3 33 


518 17 


36 09 


554 26 


108 30 


1,001 00 


9 07 


991 93 


69 08 


1,061 01 


207 88 


371 00 




371 00 


25 84 


396 84 


77 05 


735 50 


11 90 


723 60 


50 39 


773 99 


152 75 


1,298 00 




1,298 00 


90 39 


1,388 39 


269 56 


91 00 




91 00 


6 33 


97 33 


18 90 


509 00 


2 08 


506 92 


35 30 


542 22 


105 71 


427 50 


2 33 


425 17 


29 61 


454 78 


88 78 


628 50 


2 49 


626 01 


43 60 


669 61 


130 52 


964 50 


5 06 


959 44 


66 80 


1,026 24 


200 30 


1.854 00 


5 82 


1,848 18 


128 71 


1,976 89 


385 46 


257 50 




257 50 


17 93 


275 43 


53 48 


1,871 00 


37 56 


1,833 44 


127 68 


1,961 12 


388 56 


601 50 




601 50 


41 89 


643 39 


124 92 


439 50 


5 99 


433 51 


30 19 


463 70 


91 27 


880 50 




880 50 


61 32 


941 82 


182 86 


342 00 


3 74 


338 26 


23 56 


361 82 


71 03 


903 60 


1 66 


901 84 


62 80 


964 64 


187 64 


793 50 


3 08 


790 42 


55 05 


845 47 


164 79 


1,709 50 


6 66 


1,702 84 


118 59 


1,821 43 


355 02 


927 00 


4 16 


922 84 


64 27 


987 11 


192 52 


1,011 50 


9 24 


1,002 26 


69 80 


1,072 06 


210 07 


655 50 


5 08 


650 42 


45 30 


695 72 


136 13 


321 00 




321 00 


22 35 


343 35 


66 66 


902 50 


3 33 


899 17 


62 62 


961 79 


187 43 


1,271 00 


5 40 


1,265 60 


88 14 


1,353 74 


263 96 


1,393 00 


8 90 


1.384 10 


96 39 


1,480 49 


289 29 


1,048 50 


7 31 


1,041 19 


72 51 


1,113 70 


217 75 


392 00 


4 16 


387 84 


27 01 


414 85 


81 41 


467 50 




467 50 


32 53 


500 06 


97 09 


754 50 


14 99 


739 51 


51 50 


791 01 


156 69 


306 50 




306 50 


21 34 


327 84 


63 65 


171 00 


4 58 


166 42 


11 59 


178 01 


35 51 


983 50 


5 41 


978 09 


68 11 


1,046 20 


204 25 


1,407 00 


2 66 


1,404 34 


97 80 


1,502 14 


292 20 


1,078 50 




1,078 50 


75 11 


1,153 61 


223 98 


530 50 


4 16 


526 34 


36 65 


562 99 


110 17 


3,754 00 


19 40 


3,734 60 


260 08 


3,994 68 


779 62 


1,255 00 


6 66 


1.248 34 


86 93 


1,335 27 


260 63 


521 00 


7 33 


513 67 


35 77 


549 44 


108 20 


2,117 50 


5 24 


2,112 26 


147 10 


2,259 36 


439 75 


10,622 50 


184 41 


10,438 09 


720 91 


11,185 00 


2,206 04 


1,017 00 


2 83 


1,014 17 


70 63 


1,084 80 


211 21 


91 50 




91 50 


6 37 


97 87 


19 00 


1,049 50 


7 07 


1,042 43 


72 60 


1,115 03 


217 96 


442 50 


2 50 


440 00 


30 64 


470 64 


91 90 


1,033 00 


3 33 


1,029 67 


71 71 


1,101 38 


214 53 


551 00 




551 00 


38 37 


589 37 


114 43 


388 00 


2 00 


386 00 


26 88 


412 88 


80 58 


680 00 


3 00 


677 00 


47 14 


724 14 


141 22 


103 50 




103 50 


7 20 


110 70 


21 49 


259 00 




259 00 


18 04 


277 04 


53 79 


260 00 


83 


259 17 


18 05 


277 22 


54 00 


562 50 




562 50 


39 17 


601 67 


116 82 


102 50 




102 5C 


7 14 


109 64 


21 29 


357 50 




357 50 


24 9C 


382 4C 


74 24 


776 5C 




776 5C 


54 08 


830 58 


161 26 


614 50 


2 49 


612 01 


42 62 


654 63 


127 62 



Net 
Income 



Adams 

Allen 

Bartholomew. 

Benton 

Blackford . . . . 



Boone. . 
Brown . 
Carroll. 
Cass. . . 
Clark.. 



Clay 

Clinton . . 
Crawford. 
Daviess . . 
Dearborn. 



Decatur. , 
Dekalb... 

Delaware. 
Dubois. . . 
Elkhart.. 



Fayette. . 
Floyd..., 
Fountain. 
Franklin . 
Fulton... 



Gibson. . . 

Grant 

Greene. . . 
Hamilton. 
Hancock . 



Harrison .... 
Hendricks . . . 

Henry 

Howard 

Huntington . . 

Jackson 

Jasper 

Jay 

Jefferson. . . . 
Jermings. . . . 

Johnson 

Knox 

Kosciusko . . . 
Lagrange. . . . 
Lake 

Laporte 

Lawrence 

Madison .... 

Marion 

Marshall .... 

Martin 

Miami 

Monroe 

Montgomery. 
Morgan 

Newton 

Noble 

Ohio 

Orange 

Owen 

Parke 

Perry 

Pike 

Porter 

Posey 



491 

313 
481 
907 
680 
188 

no 

392 
401 
525 
309 



$5a5 68 

2,565 56 

566 24 

396 43 

318 82 

845 74 

90 08 

445 96 

853 13 

319 79 

021 24 

1,118 83 

78 43 

436 51 

366 00 

539 09 
825 94 

1,591 43 
221 95 

1,572 56 

518 47 
372 43 
758 96 
290 79 
777 00 

680 68 
1,466 41 
794 59 
861 99 
559 59 

276 69 

774 36 

1,089 78 

1,191 20 

895 95 

333 44 
402 97 
634 32 
264 19 
142 50 

841 95 

1,209 94 

929 63 

452 82 

3,215 06 

1,074 64 
441 24 

1,819 61 

8,958 96 

873 59 

78 87 
897 07 
378 74 
886 85 
474 94 

332 30 
582 92 
89 21 
223 25 
223 22 

484 85 
88 35 
308 16 
669 32 
527 Oi 



10 



Year Book 



Adjusting Entrees — Continued 



Counties 



Pulaski 

PutDam 

Randolph 

Ripley 

Rush 

Scott 

Shelby 

Spencer 

Starke 

St. Joseph . . 

Steuben 

Sullivan 

Switzerland. . 
Tippecanoe. . 
Tipton 

Union 

Vanderburgh 
Vermillion. . 
Vigo 

Wabash 

Warren 

Warrick 

Washington. 

Wayne 

Wells 

White 

Whitley 

Total... 



Road 
Mile. 



501 
139 

641 
667 

130 
312 
415 
435 



72 



72 



31,992 



Fees 
Paid 



$475 00 

710 50 

948 00 

433 00 

1,026 00 

95 50 

971 50 

252 00 

343 50 

2,770 CO 

599 00 
950 00 
185 50 
1,562 50 
695 50 

348 50 
1,446 00 

845 00 
2,400 00 

1,009 00 
384 00 
360 50 

282 50 

1,342 50 
716 50 
684 50 
691 00 



$85, 189 50 



Ret rites 



$4 25 
3 49 

1 25 

2 08 



2 50 



2 08 
20 21 



2 66 
6-65 


■■■l7'48 
7 07 


3 33 



1 25 



6 25 

2 08 

3 50 



8 90 
7 50 



9 16 



$582 51 



Rebates 



$476 00 

706 25 

944 51 

431 75 

1,023 92 

95 50 

OGd 00 

252 00 

.341 42 

2,749 79 

596 34 
943 35 
185 50 
1,545 02 
688 43 

345 17 
1,446 00 

845 00 
2,398 75 

1,002 75 
381 92 
357 00 
281 84 

1,333 60 
709 00 
684 50 

681 84 



$84, 



Dep. 
Interest 



$33 15 

49 18 
65 78 
30 07 
71 31 

6 65 
67 48 
17 55 

23 78 
191 50 

41 53 
65 69 
^12 92 
107 60 
47 94 

24 04 
100 70 
i58 85 
167 95 

69 83 
26 60 
24 86 
19 63 

92 87 
49 37 
47 67 
47 48 



$5,892 07 



Net 
Receipts 



$509 15 
755 43 

1,010 29 
461 82 

1,095 23 

102 15 
1,036 48 
-■ 269 55 
" 365 20 
2,941 29 

637 87 
1,00D 04 

198 42 
1,652 62 

736 37 

369 21 
1,546 70 

903 85 
2,565 80 

1,072 58 
408 52 
381 86 
301 47 

1,426 47 
758 37 
732 17 
729 32 



$90,499 06 



$98 85 

147 55 

196 88 
89 92 

213 07 

19 83 

201 76 

52 33 

71 34 
575 26 

124 40 

197 29 
38 52 

324 49 
144 44 

72 38 
300 30 
175 49 
498 42 

209 55 
79 75 

74 87 
58 67 

278 80 

148 80 

142 15 

143 50 



$17,692 24 



Net 
Income 



$410 30 
607 88 
813 41 
371 90 
882 16 

82 32 

834 72 

217 22 

293 86 

2,366 03 

513 47 
811 75 
159 90 
1,328 13 
591 93 

296 83 
1,246 40 

728 36 
2,067 38 

863 03 
328 77 
306 99 
242 80 

1,147 67 
609 57 
590 02 

585 82 



$72,806 82 



Secretary of State 



11 



(3) DiSTRffiUTION OF AUTOMOBILE FuNDS, JULY 1 TO DECEMBER 31, 1917 



Counties 



Adams 

Allen 

Bartholomew. 

Benton . . 

Blackford . . . 

Boone 

Brown 

Carroll 

Cass 

Clark 

Clay 

Clinton 

Crawford.... 

Daviess 

Dearborn 

Decatur 

Dekalb 

Delaware 

Dubois 

Elkhart 

Fayette..... 

Floyd 

Fountain 

Franklin 

Fulton 

Gibson 

Grant 

Greene 

Hamilton 

Hancock .... 

Harrison 

Hendricks . . 

Henry 

Howard 

Huntington. . 

Jackson 

Jasper 

Jay 

Jefferson 

Jennings . . . 

Johnson.. .. 

Knox 

Ko3ciu.sko . . . 
Lagrange. . . 
Lake 

Laporte — 

Lawrence 

Madison .... 

Marion 

Marshall 

Martin 

Miami 

Monroe 

Montgomery. 
Morgan 

Newton 

Noble 

Ohio 

Orange 

Owen 

Parke 

Perry 

Pike 

Porter 

Posey , 



One-third Equal 
to Counties 



1263 79 
263 7fi 
263 79 
283 79 
263 80 

263 79 
263 80 
263 79 
263 79 
263 80 

263 79 
263 79 
263 80 
263 79 
263 80 

263 79 
263 79 
263 79 
263 80 
263 79 

263 79 
263 80 
263 79 
263 80 
263 79 

263 79 
263 79 
263 79 
263 79 
263 79 

263 SO 
263 79 
263 79 
263 79 
263 79 



263 79 
263 79 
263 80 
263 80 

263 79 
263 79 
263 79 
263 79 
263 79 

263 79 
283 79 
263 79 
263 79 
263 79 

263 80 
263 79 
263 79 
263 79 
263 79 

263 80 
263 79 
263 80 
263 80 
263 80 

263 79 
263 80 
263 79 
263 79 
263 79 



One-third Road 
Mileage Basis 



$411 92 
307 23 
338 32 
371 71 
208 61 

43;^ 08 

27 3? 

322 40 

311 02 

182 82 

279 92 
620 63 

54 62 
257 92 

71 32 

289 78 
18 90 

394 47 
87 24 
76 62 

62 20 

56 89 

270 82 

135 03 

115 31 

194 96 
716 87 
360 33 
606 87 

248 82 

113 79 
309 51 
439 98 
407 36 



447 57 
197 23 
366 40 
160 82 
205 58 

277 65 

482 47 

31 87 



372 47 

237 44 
364 88 
688 04 
515 84 
142 62 

83 45 
297 37 
o04 20 
398 26 
234 41 

233 65 

7 59 

37 17 

243 51 

191 92 

568 95 

15 93 

69 79 

232 13 

201 79 



One-third 
Receipt Basis 



$194 98 

8.55 16 

188 58 

1S2 09 

106 33 

282 38 
29 99 
148 63 
284 53 
106 42 

207 56 
372 32 
: 26 II 
145 41 
121 95 

179 57 
275 21 
530 14 

73 86 
525 91 

172 54 
124 35 
252 57 
I 97 03 
258 69 

226 73 
488 45 
264 71 
287 49 
186 57 

92 08 
257 92 
363 03 
397 02 

298 66 

111 25 
134 10 
212 12 

87 92 
47 74 

280 56 
402 82 
309 35 
150 98 
1.071 24 

358 08 
147 34 
605 89 
2,994 10 
290 91 

26 26 

299 01 
126 21 
295 35 
158 05 

110 72 
194 19 
29 70 

74 29 
74 34 

161 35 
29 40 
102 55 
222 73 
175 55 



Total 
Due Counties 



.♦870 69 

1,426 18 

790 69 

767 59 

578 74 

986 15 
321 11 
734 82 
859 34 
553 04 

751 27 
1,256 64 
344 53 
667 12 
457 08 

733 14 
557 96 
1,188 40 
424 90 
866 32 

498 53 
445 04 
787 18 
495 86 
637 79 

685 48 
1,469 11 

888 83 
1,158 15 

699 18 

469 67 

831 22 

1,066 80 

1,068 17 



822 62 
595 12 
842 31 
512 54 
517 12 

822 00 

1,149 08 

605 02 

414 77 

1,707 50 

859 31 
776 01 

1,557 72 

3,773 73 

697 32 

373 51 

860 17 
694 20 
957 40 
656 25 

608 17 
465 57 
330 67 
581 60 
530 06 

994 09 
309 13 
436 13 
718 65 
641 13 



12 



Year Book 

Distribution of Automobile Funds — Continued 



CoUNTiES 


One-third Equal 
to Counties 


One-third Road 
Mileage Basis 


One-third 
Receipt Basis 


Total 
Due Counties 


Pulaski 

Putnam 

Randolph 

Ripley 

Rush 


$263 79 
263 79 
263 79 
263 80 
263 79 

263 80 
263 79 
263 80 
263 79 
263 79 

263 79 
263 79 
263 80 
263 79 
263 79 

263 80 
263 79 
263 79 
263 79 

263 79 
263 80 
263 80 
263 80 

263 79 
263 79 
263 79 
263 79 


$263 99 
659 98 
416 47 
249 58 
236 68 

117 58 
295 85 

36 65 
243 51 

58 41 

18 21 
380 05 
105 44 
486 26 
505 98 

98 62 
236 68 
314 82 
329 99 

333 78 

310 26 

54 62 

197 23 

323 92 

573 50 

318 61 

54 62 


$136 54 

202 58 
270 93 
123 80 
293 70 

27 40 

277 95 
72 '28 
97 93 

788 76 

171 06 

270 59 
53 21 
443 18 
197 47 

99 01- 
414 77 
242 38 
688 07 

287 63 
109 55 
102 40 
80 84 

382 53 

203 37 
196 34 
195 58 


$604 32 

1,126 35 

951 19 

637 18 

794 17 


Scott 

Shelby 


408 78 
837 59 


Spenocr 

Starke 


371 73 
605 23 


St. Joseph 


1,110 96 


Steuben 


453 06 
914 43 


Switzerland 

Tippecanoe 

Tipton 

Union 

Vanderburgh 

VermiUion 

Vigo 

Wabash 

Warren 

Warrirk 

Washington 

Wayne 

Wells 

White 

Whitley 


422 45 

1,193 23 

967 24 

461 43 

915 24 

820 99 

1,281 85 

885 20 
683 61 
420 82 
541 87 

970 24 

1,040 66 

778 74 

513 99 


Total 


$24,268 94 


$24,268 94 


$24,268 94 


$72,806 82 



Secretary of State 



18 



(4) Classified Receipts — ^.January 1st to July 1st, 1918 



Count! R3 



Adams 

Alien 

Bartholomew 

Benton 

Blackford... 

Boone 

Brown 

Carroll 

Cass 

Clark 

dlay 

Clinton 

Crawford.. . 

Daviess 

Dearborn — 

Decatur 

Dekalb 

Delaware — 

Dubois 

Elkhart 

Fayette 

Floyd 

Fountain — 

Franklin 

Fulton 

Gibson 

Grant 

Greene 

Hamilton 

Hancock 

Harrison .... 
Hendricks . . . 

Henry 

Howard 

Huntington.. 

Jackson 

Jasper 

Jay 

Jefferson .... 
Jennings .... 

Johnson 

Kno.t 

Kosciusko . . . 
Lagrange — 
Lake 

Laporte 

Lawrence — 
Madison .... 

Marion 

Marshall 

Martin 

Miami 

Monroe 

Montgomery. 
Morgan 

Newton 

Noble 

Ohio 

Orange 

Owen 

K,rke 

Perrj- 

Pike 

Porter 



Motor 
Vehicles 



m,M9 
47,25L 
10.527 
10,401 
6,871 

13,833 
784 
11,873 
18,294 
4,759 

9,410 
18,240 

v,m 

6,840 
6,815 

9,337 
13,848 
22, 679 

3,495 
28,348 

8, 893 
6,052 

11,275 
5,905 

11,101 

9,200 
21,908 
11,691 
15, 107 
10,305 

3,620 
10,431 
16, 996 
19,391 
18,765 

5.938 
7,248 
10,821 
4,889 
2,144 

11,101 
15,740 
16,613 
9,618 
41,405 

16,808 
6,205 
27,446 
118,431 
14,053 

1,442 
15,440 

5,712 
17,234 

7,893 

7,656 
13,223 
1,596 
3,608 
2,951 

7,849 
1,315 
4,021 
10, 171 
7,127 



5182 

768 

104 

38 

74 

70 
4 
3P 



100 

116 

2 

40 

28 

26 

158 

402 

8 

650 

144 
90 
36 
16 

130 

6i 
580 
86 
66 
128 

12 

46 
146 
256 
300 

54 
34 
198 
12 

28 

62 
528 
108 

00 
1,616 

422 
84 
616 
2,102 
130 

2 
166 
46 
86 
40 

36 
86 
2 
14 
16 

38 

2 

24 

116 

10 



Chauf- 


Dupli- 


Trans- 


feurs 


cates 


fers 


m 


•SlOO 


S15 


683 


382 


Izo 


no 


86 


44 


4 


32 


6 


6 


22 


6 


12 


67 


27 


2 




4 


14 


33 


19 


134 


46 


25 


24 


6 


10 


6 


45 


40 


24 


51 


27 


s 


1 




2 


41 


9 


8 


20 


10 


28 


21 


23 


4 


57 


19 


248 


149 


47 




9 

250 


13 
39 


200 


32 


78 


52 


42 


35 


17 


10 


43 


14 


2 


21 


7 


20 


64 


44 


34 


36 


58 


92 


81 


66 


44 


45 


26 


22 


63 


34 


2 


33 


24 


12 


31 


14 


6 


53 


37 


156 


100 


32 


38 


114 


39 


28 


96 


48 


14 


34 


7 


8 


30 


5 


30 


61 


17 


8 


14 


7 


2 


2 


1 


14 


57 


57 


124 


93 


37 


20 


88 


16 


12 


52 


28 


638 


117 


68 


174 


109 


39 


16 


26 


9 


146 


199 


89 


1,496 


1; 199 


508 


35 


89 

2 
111 


20 


98 


51 


56 


23 


3 


12 


65 


29 




41 

25 
61 


15 

4 
17 




36 




3 
9 




4 


2 






I 

9 


12 


16 


2 






12 


19 


13 


66 


36 


23 


38 


30 


8 



Dealers 



Total 




250 
250 
375 
175 
625 

375 

50 

675 

2,250 

325 

50 
450 
125 
450 
175 

175 

350 

25 

25 



150 



150 
275 
175 



812,285 

50,13i 

11,198 

10,741 

6,12fi 

14,334 

794 
12,169 
18,907 
4,942 

9,782 
18,733 
1,229 
7,107 
7,031 

9.585 
14,481 
23.960 

3, 625 
30,2!2 

0,'419 
6,411 

11,659 
8,176 

11,534 

9,642 
23.052 
12,002 
15,542 
10,770 

3,764 
10,948 
17,780 
20, 188 
19,687 

6,297 
7,500 
11,252 
5,005 
2,175 

11,541 
16,372 
17,220 
9,945 
4^1,469 

17,92? 
6,390 
29,171 
125,9.86 
14,653 

1,496 
16.316 

5,965 
17,876 

8,164 

7,935 
13, 773 
1.626 
3,662 
3,043 

8.074 
1,319 
4.239 
10,687 

7.388 



14 



Year Book 

Classified Receipts — Continued 



COXJNTIES 



Pulaski 

Putnam 

Randolph . . . 

Ripley 

Rush.. 

Scott 

Shelby 

Spencer 

Starke 

St. Joseph... 

Steuben 

Sullivan 

Switzerland. . 
Tippecanoe. . 
Tipton 

Union 

Vanderburgh. 
Vermillion.. . 
Vigo 

Wabash 

Warren 

Warrick 

Washington. . 

Wayne 

Wells 

White 

Whitley 

Total... 



Motor 
Vehicles 



$6,259 
9,367 

14,707 
5,920 

12,904 

1,378 

13,654 

3.261 

4,000 

35,529 

10,513 
11,802 
3,225 
21,588 
10,154 

4, 756 
21,709 
10,612 
29,505 

15,861 
6,565 
4,300 
4,835 

22,240 
12.339 
10,693 
11,174 

$1,170,735 



Motor- 
cycles 



134 
46 
76 
22 

102 



10 

34 

1,056 

72 
84 
16 
208 
42 

20 
250 

78 



132 

6 

28 

32 

414 



$15, 120 



Chauf- 
feurs 



$12 



702 



404 
16 



2 
630 



118 



2 
10 
4 

276 
14 
16 
4 



$7,598 



Dupli- 
cates 



$14 

38 
67 
28 
61 

3 
53 

2 

11 

261 

28 
27 



62 

27 
84 
41 
121 

100 
17 
14 



167 
60 
15 
43 



Trans- 
fers 



$8,397 



58 
16 

19 
120 
57 
74 

65 
11 
14 



$2,917 



Dealers 



Total 



$150 
200 
525 
200 
225 

25 
250 

25 
125 
550 

225 
225 
75 
375 
150 

175 
525 
325 
475 

350 
50 
125 

125 

475 

125 

150 

• 125 



$6,476 
9,670 

15,410 
6,190 

13,381 

1,414 
14,128 
3,312 
4,172 
38, 174 

10,865 
12,186 
3,323 
22,722 
10,440 

4,999 
23,318 
11,141 
80,753 

16,606 
6,651 
4,491 
5,034 

23,616 
12,035 
10,947 
11,421 



$24,225 



$1,226,992 



Secretary of State 



15 



(5) Adjusting Entries— Distribution January 1 to July I, 1918 



Counties 



Adams 

Allen 

Bartholomew, 

Benton 

Blackford... 

Boone 

Brown 

Carroll 

Cass 

Clark 

Clay 

Clinton 

Crawford — 

Daviess 

Dearborn 

Decatur 

Dekalb 

Delaware. . . 

Dubois 

Elkhart 

Favette 

Floyd 

Foantain. > . 
Franklin. . . . 
Fulton 

Gibson 

Grant 

Greene 

Hamilton 

Hancock .... 

Harrison 

Hendricks... 

Henry 

Howard .... 
Huntington.. 

Jackson 

Jasper 

Jay 

Jefferson .... 
Jennings 

Johnson 

Knox 

Kosciusko . . . 

Lagrange 

Lake 

Laporte 

Lawrence — 
Madison . . . . 

Marion 

Marshall .... 

Martin 

Miami 

Monroe 

Montgomery. 
Morgan 

Newton 

Noble 

Ohio 

Orange 

Owen 

Parke 

Perry 

Pike 

Porter 

Posey 



Fees Paid Rebates 



9, 782 00 
18,733 00 
1.229 00 
7, 107 00 
7,031 00 

9,585 00 
14,481 00 
23,960 00 

3,625 00 
30,212 00 

9,449 00 
6,411 00 

11,659 00 
6, 176 00 

11,5.34 00 

9,642 00 
23,052 00 
12.092 00 
15,542 00 
10, 770 00 

3,764 00 
10.948 00 
17,780 00 
20, 188 00 
19,687 00 



1,496 00 
16,316 00 

5,965 00 
17,876 00 

8, 164 00 



Fees, less 
Retetes 



32 07 

26 22 



3 33 



83 63 




12 .57 



$12,268 35 

50,031 55 

11,178 01 

10, 733 92 

6,108 77 

14,326 01 
791 09 
12,160 25 
18,890 76 
4,921 44 

9,770 35 
18,723 75 
1,223 18 
7,096 51 
7,021 42 

9,574 75 
14.447 25 
23,908 37 

3,596 85 
30, 126 87 

9,4.32 34 
6,405 67 

11.643 09 
6,169 25 

11,514 01 

9, 608 93 
23,021 69 
12,078 67 
15.529 09 
10,712 37 

3,761 09 
10,938 42 
17.755 93 
20,130 29 
19.651 69 

6.297 00 
7.467 93 
11,225 78 
5,005 00 
2,171 67 

11,499 41 
16,317 22 
17.208 26 
9.945 00 
44,385 37 

17,904 11 

6,374 10 

29,133 10 

125,226 38 

14.644 68 

1,493 09 
18,277 68 

5,962 09 
17,860 18 

8, 160 25 

7,929 75 
13,763 09 
1,626 00 
3,662 00 
3,037 59 

8,063 34 
1,316 09 
4,227 50 
10,687 00 
7,375 43 



Dep. 
Interest 



$80 55 

328 49 

73 39 

70 48 

40 11 

94 08 

5 19 

79 84 

124 03 

32 31 

64 15 
122 94 
8 03 
46 59 
46 10 

62 87 
94 86 

156 98 

23 62 
197 81 

61 93 
42 08 

78 45 

40 51 
75 60 

63 09 
151 15 

79 31 
101 96 

70 33 

24 69 

71 82 

116 58 
1.32 17 
129 03 

41 34 
49 03 
73 71 
32 86 
14 26 

75 50 
107 13 
112 

85 30 
291 42 

117 55 
41 85 

191 28 

822 20 

96 15 



108 87 
39 15 

117 27 
53 58 

52 06 
90 36 
10 68 
24 04 
19 94 

52 94 
8 64 
27 76 
70 17 
48 43 



Net 
Receipts 



$12,348 90 

50,. 380 04 

11,251 40 

10,804 40 

6, 148 88 

14,420 07 
796 28 
12,240 09 
19,014 79 
4,953 75 

9,834 50 
18,846 69 
1,231 21 
7,143 10 
7,067 52 

9.637 62 
14,542 11 
24,085 35 

3,620 47 
30,324 88 

9,494 27 

6.447 73 

11,719 54 

?.6,209 78 

11,589 61 

9,672 02 
23,172 84 
12,157 98 
15,631 05 
10,782 70 

3,785 78 
11,010 24 
17.872 51 
20.262 45 
19, 780 72 

6,338 34 
7,516 96 
11,299 49 
5,0.37 86 
2, 185 93 

11,574 91 
16 424 35 
17,321 24 
10,010 30 
44,676 79 

18,021 65 

6,415 95 

29,324 38 

128,048 58 

14,740 83 

1,502 89 
16,384 55 

6,091 24 
17,977 45 

8,213 83 

7,981 81 
13,853 45 
1,636 
3,686 04 
3,057 53 

8,116 28 
1,324 73 
4.255 26 
10.757 17 
7,423 86 



Expense 



$703 22 

2,869 76 

640 88 

614 83 

350 84 

820 50 
45 45 

696 58 
1,082 27 



559 04 

1.072 31 

70 35 

406 82 

402 47 

548 66 
827 77 

1.371 52 
207 50 

1,729 39 

540 88 
368,98 
667 38 
353 53 
660 23 

551 93 
1,319 54 
692 17 
889 65 
616 49 

215 46 

626 88 

1,017 76 

1,155 60 

1,126 92 

360 45 
429 31 
644 09 
288 50 
124 50 

660 63 
937 16 
985 70 
569 27 
2,545 49 

1,026 17 

365 78 

1,869 80 

7,211 67 

838 77 

85 63 

933 96 

341 45 

1,023 26 

467 32 

454 27 
788 39 
93 08 
209 62 
171 19 

462 17 
75 50 

242 65 
611 74 
422 90 



Net 
Income 



$11,645 68 

47,490 28 

10.610 52 

10, 189 57 . 

5.798 04 

13,599 .57 
750 83 
11,543 51 
17.932 .52 
4,670 86 

9,274 .56 
17,774 .38 
1,160 86 
6,736 28 
6,665 05 

9,033 96 
13.714 .34 
22,693 83 

3.412 97 
28.595 29 

8,953 39 
6.080 75 

11.052 16 
5.855 23 

10,929 38 

9, 120 C9 

21.853 .30 
11,485 81 
14,741 40 
10,165 2t 

3.570 32 
10.383 56 
16,851 75 
19. 103 88 
18.853 80 

5.977 89 
7.0S7 65 
10.655 40 
4.751 36 
2.051 43 

10.914 28 
15,437 19 
16,335 54 
9,441 03 
42,131 30 

16,995 49 

8.050 17 

27,654 58 

lis. 833 91 

13.932 03 

1.417 26 
15.450 59 

5.659 79 
16,954 19 

7, 748 51 

7,527 54 
13,055 05 
1.543 50 
3,476 42 
2,883 31 

7,654 11 
1.249 23 
4.012 61 
10,145 43 
7.000 96 



16 



Year Book 



Adjusting Entries — Continued 



Counties 



Pulaski 

Putnam.. . . 
Randolph. . . 

Ripley 

Rush 

Scott 

Shelby 

Spencer 

StarJce 

St. Joseph . . . 

Steuben 

Sullivan 

Switzerland. , 
Tippecanoe. . 
Tipton 

Union 

Vanderburgh 
Vermillion., . 
Vigo . . 

Wabash 

Warren 

Warrick. . . . 
Washington, , 

Wayne 

Wells 

White 

Whitley 

Total... 



Fees Paid 



$6,476 00 
9,670 00 

15,410 00 
6,190 00 

13,381 00 

1,414 GO 

14,128 00 

3,312 00 

4,172 00 

38, 174 00 

10,865 00 
12, 180 00 
3,323 00 
22,722 00 
10,440 00 

4,999 00 
23,318 00 
11,141 00 
30, 753 00 

16,606 00 
6,651 00 
4,i91 00 
5,034 00 

23,616 00 
12, 635 00 
10,947 00 
11,421 00 



Rebates 



$6 

23 30 
30 66 



13 75 



16 67 



4 17 
123 93 

3 33 
52 05 

6 66 
61 89 
16 67 

7 91 
72 63 
10 41 
67 12 

44 48 



30 73 
20 90 
35 00 
2 50 



$1,226,992 00 $2,670 35 



Fees, less 
Rebates 



$6,469 34 
9,646 70 

15,379 34 
6,190 00 

13,367 25 

1,414 OU 

14.1T1 33 

3,312 00 

4,167 83 

38,050 07 

10,861 67 
12,133 95 
3,316 34 
22,660 11 
10,423 33 

4,991 
23,245 37 
11,130 59 
30,685 88 

16,561 52 
6,651 00 
4,491 00 
5,034 00 

23,585 27 
12,614 10 
10,912 00 
11,418 50 



Dep. 
Interest 



$1,224,321 65 



$42 48 
63 34 

100 98 
40 64 
87 77 



92 65 

21 75 

27 36 

249 83 

71 31 

79 67 

21 77 

148 78 



32 77 
152 62 

73 08 
201 48 

108 74 
43 67 
29 49 

33 05 

154 85 
82 82 
71 65 

74 67 



Net 
Receipts 



$8,038 57 



$6,511 82 
9, 710 04 

15,480 32 
6,230 64 

13,455 02 

1.423 28 

14,203 
3,333 75 
4,195 19 

38,299 90 

10,932 
12,213 62 
3 338 11 
22,808 
10,491 77 

5.023 86 
23,397 
11,203 67 
30,887 36 

16.670 26 
6,694 67 
4,520 49 
5,067 05 

23,740 12 
12, 696 92 
10,983 65 
11,493 47 



,360 22 



Expense 



$370 70 
553 63 
882 10 
354 33 
765 95 

80 94 



238 81 
2,185 15 

621 93 
697 55 
190 21 
1,300 65 
597 61 

286 15 
1,334 77 

637 73 
1,760 36 

950 56 
380 72 
257 07 
288 16 

1,351 82 
723 25 
626 03 
653 76 



$70,235 31 



Net 
Income 



$6,141 12 
9.156 51 

14,598 22 
5,876 31 

12,689 07 

1,342 34 

13,395 27 

3,144 16 

3,956 38 

36,114 75 

10,311 05 
11,516 07 

3, 147 90 
21,508 24 

9,894 16 

4,737 71 
22,063 23 
10,565 94 
29, 127 00 

15,719 70 
6,313 95 
4,263 42 
4,778 89 



11.973 67 
10,357 02 
10,839 71 



$1,162,124 91 



Secretary of State 



17 



(6) Distribution of Automobile Funds, January 1 to July 1, 1918 



COUNTIM 


Road 
Mileage 


Oue-third Equal 
to Counties 


One-third Road 
Mileage Basis 


One-third 
Receipt Basis 


Total Due 
Counties 


Adams 

Allen 

Bartholomew 

Benton 

Blackford 

Boone 

Brown 

Carroll 

Casa 

Clark 

Clay 

Clinton 


550.66 
4,36.00 
484. 93f 
502 00 
261.00 

633 90 
41.00 
458.00 
421.09 
243.50 

371.13 

818.75 
76.44 

347.00 
94.00 

390.56 
52.00 
518.00 
125.00 
101.00 

96.00 
80.00 
381.88 
184.64 
168.43 

202.13 
945.00 
485.00 
806.00 
406.00 

171.00 
425.00 
575.00 
539.24 
445.75 

591.00 
276.84 
490.00 
212.84 
271.00 

383.59 

636.00 

59.50 

4.00 

497.02 

329.00 
494.00 
930.42 
900.00 
197.10 

120.00 
402.07 
360.00 
530.00 
319.00 

329.00 

22.00 

49.50 

340.00 

256.00 

743.00 

23.00 

92.00 

316.67 

276.50 


$4,210 59 
4,2t0 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 

4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 

4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 

4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 

4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4, 210 59 
4,210 59 

4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 

4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 

4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 

4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 

4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 

4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 

4.210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 

4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 


36,505 12 
5,1.50 61 
6,492 37 
5,930 28 
3,083 28 

7,488 46 
4S4 35 
5,410 50 
4,973 41 
2,876 54 

4,384 28 
9,672 15 
903 01 
4,099 22 
1,110 45 

4,613 81 
614 29 
6,473 70 
1,476 66 
1,193 14 

1,134 08 
945 07 
4,275 00 
2,181 21 
1,989 72 

3,096 62 
11,163 58 
5, 729 46 
9,521 53 
4,790 21 

2,020 08 
5,020 66 
6,792 66 
6,370 21 
5,265 79 

6,981 67 
3,270 46 
5,788 53 
2,514 35 
3,201 41 

4,531 47 

7,513 27 

702 89 

47 25 

5,871 45 

3,886 58 
5,835 78 
10.991 35 
10,631 98 
2,328 40 

1,417 60 
4,749 78 
4,252 79 
6,261 06 
3, 768 45 

3,886 S 

259 89 

584 76 

4,016 53 

3,024 21 

8,777 29 
271 71 
1,086 82 
3, 740 92 
3,266 38 


$3,878 51 
15,827 87 
3,. '534 70 
3,391 06 
1,934 99 

4,525 41 
250 67 
3,841 89 
5,969 15 
1,560 25 

3,088 29 
5,914 22 
388 01 
2,243 76 
2,219 77 

3,026 09 
4,565 50 
7,584 44 
1,144 45 
9,538 27 

2,983 16 
2,024 03 
3,680 88 
1,949 83 
3,641 41 

3,044 09 
7,277 78 
3,817 58 
4,90b 79 
3,400 21 

1,188 34 
3,456 41 
5,613 35 

6.373 58 
6,215 41 

1,988 03 
2,. 367 84 
3,552 38 
1,580 14 
686 67 

3,643 62 
5, 168 83 
5,436 55 
3,139 75 
14,039 37 

5,659 76 
2,017 40 
9,209 62 
39,775 21 
4,626 12 

472 30 
5,151 15 

1,883 22 
5,643 66 
2,577 47 

2,505 49 
4,348 29 

513 35 
1,156 13 

960 71 

2,549 05 

416 42 

1,338 30 

3.374 01 
2.332 48 


?14,594 22 
25, 180 07 
13,2.37 66 
13, 5.^ 93 

9.228 86 

10,224 46 
4,945 61 
13,462 98 
15,1.53 15 

8,6-47 38 

11,683 16 
19,790 96 


Crawford 

Daviess 

Dearborn 

Decatur 

Dekalb 

Delaware 


5,. 501 61 
10, .553 57 
7,540 81 

11,850 49 
9,390 38 
18,248 73 


Dubois 


6,831 70 


Elkhart 

Fayette 


14,942 00 
8,327 83 


Floyd.. 


7,179 69 


Foiinta.in 


12,166 47 


III 


8,341 63 
9,841 72 

10,351 30 


Grant 


22,6.51 95 


Greene. 

Hamilton 


13,757 63 
18,638 91 


Haneock 

Harrison . . 


12,407 01 
7,419 01 


Hendricks 

Henry 


12,687 66 
16,616 60 


Howard 


16,954 .38 


Huntington 


15,691 79 


Jackson 


13, 180 29 


Jasper. . 


9,848 83 


Jay 


13,551 50 


Jefif erson 


8,305 08 


Jennings. . 


8,098 67 


Johnson 


12,385 68 


Knox .... 


16,892 69 


Kosciusko 


10,350 03 


Lagrange 


7,397 59 


Lake.. 


24,121 41 


Laporte 

Lawrence 


13,756 93 
12,063 77 




24,411 56 


Marion 

MarshaU 

Martin 

Miami 

Monroe 

MoMtgomery 

iMorgan 

Newton . . 


54.617 78 
11,165 11 

6,100 49 
14,111 52 
10.346 60 
16,115 31 
10,556 51 

10,602 66 


Noble 


8,818 77 


Ohio 

Orange 

Oweu 

Parke 

Perry 

Pike. 


5,308 70 
9,383 25 
8. 195 51 

15,536 93 

4,898 72 

(6,635 71 


Porter 

Posey 


11,325 52 
9,809 45 



2—18966 



18 



Year Book 
Distribution of Automobile Funds — Continued 



Counties 


Road 
Mileage 


One-third Eimal 
to Countie.H 


One-third Road 
Mileage Basis 


One-third 
Receipt Basis 


TotaJ Due 
Counties 


Pulaski 

Putnam 

Randolph . 


318.00 
875.00 
550.00 
330 00 
333.47 

158.72 
418.00 
47.70 
121.50 
106.46 

47.59 
501.62 
136.50 
651.87 
669.50 

. 124.00 
214.00 
508.00 
435.00 

443.50 

412.97 

76.00 

273.97 

427.00 

761.00 

426.00 

86.05 


$4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 

4.210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 

4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 

4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 

4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 

4,210 .59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 
4,210 59 


$3,756 63 
10.336 65 
6,497 32 
3,898 39 
3,939 39 

1,875 01 
4,937 97 
563 50 
1,435 32 
1,257 64 

562 20 
5,925 80 
1,612 52 
7,700 75 
7,909 02 

1,464 85 
2.528 05 
6,001 U 

5.1.38 79 

5.2.39 21 
4,878 55 
^ 897 81 
3,236 49 

5,044 29 
8,989 93 
5,032 47 
1,018 54 


$2,044 55 
3,052 93 
4,865 11 
1,954 25 
4,224 53 

446 42 
4,460 37 
1,045 64 
1,317 15 
12,051 97 

3,4.30 20 
3,847 26 
1,049 11 
7, 173 59 
3,296 03 

1,578 24 
7,361 76 
3,517 34 
9,709 07 

5,242 70 
2,099 80 
1,417 86 
1,589 29 

7. 455 84 
3,989 01 

3.456 09 
3,605 74 


$10,011 77 
17,600 17 
15,573 02 
10,063 23 
12,374 51 

6,532 02 
13,608 93 
5,819 73 
6,963 06 
17,520 20 

8,202 99 
13,983 65 

6.872 22 
19,084 93 
15,415 64 

7,253 68 
14, 100 40 


Ripley 

Rush 

Scott 

Shelby 

Spencer 

Starke 

St. Josenh 

Steuben 

Sullivan 

Switzerland 

Tippecanoe 

Tipton 

Union 


Vermillion . . . 


13 729 09 


Vigo 

Wabash... 

Warren 

Warrick 

Washington 

Wayne 

Wells 

White 

Whitlev 


19,058 45 

14, 692 50 

11.188 94 
6,526 26 
9,036 37 

16,710 72 

17.189 53 
12,699 15 

8,832 87 






Total 


32,791.41 


.$387,374 28 


$387,375 31 


$387,375 32 


$1,162,124 91 



Secretary of St^te 



19 



(7) Receipts and Dislt^rsements 
Receipts— CoNsoLiD/. 



SOURCE 


July 1st to Dec. 31st, 1917 


Jan. Istto JuVla. (18 


Total for Year 




Number 


Amount 


Nurrber 


-Vmoi-nt 


Amount 


Automobile licenses 

Motorcycle licenses 

Chauffeurs' licenses 

Dealers' licenses . . 


25,013 

1,515 

1,041 

58 


$78, 9G 50 

2,001 on 

1,319 00 

737 50 

fl3 00 

1,317 50 

o,892 07 


209,346 

7,563 

3,804 

969 


$1,170,735 00 
15,120 00 
7,598 00 
24,225 00 
6,397 00 
2,917 00 
8,038 57 


$1,249,639 50 
17,121 00 
8,917 00 
24 962 50 


Duplicates 


7,307 00 


Transfers , . 






4,234 50 


Interest 






13.930 64 








Total 


$91,081 5/ 


81,235,030 57 


$1,326,112 14 



Disbursements— Consolidated 



ITEMS . 


July 1st to Dec. Slit, 
1917 


Jan. Ist to July 1st, 
1918 


Total for Year 




Amount 


Amount 


A Qount 


Salaries 


$8,221 00 
3,506 65 
3,077 08 
2,810 21 
582 51 
77 30 


$8,635 75 
44,566 70 
15,219 30 
1,755 38 
2, 670 35 
58 18 


16,855 <5 


Number plates and badges 


48,073 3^ 




18,296 38 


Stationery and supplies 


4,565 59 


Rebates 


3,252 86 
135 48 






Total 


$18,274 75 
$72,806 82 


$72,905 66 
$1,162,124 91 


$91,180 41 
a 234,931 73 







PROCLAMATIONS OF THE GOVERNOR 

October 12, 1917 — Discovery Day. 

October 24, 1917 — Liberty Day — Promotion of Liberty Loan. 

November 11 to 19, 1917— Y. M. C. A. Drive. 

November 29, 1917 — Thanksgiving Day. 

December 12, 1917 — Calling into Action the Liberty Guard of Indiana. 

December 16 to 23, 1917 — Red Cross Membership Campaign Week. 

February 8 and 4, 1918— Thrift Days— Teaching Thrift and Purchasing Thrift 

Stamps and War Saving Certificates. 
April 7, 1918 — Patriot Sunday — Promoting Third Liberty Loan. 
April 19, 1918 — Arbor Day. 
April 22 to 26. 1918— Educational Week. 
April 26, 1918 — Indiana Liberty Loan Day. 
May 30, 1918 — Memorial Day. 
June 28, 1918 — War Savings Stamps Drive. 
September 2, 1918 — Labor Day. 
September 6, 1918 — La Fayette and Marne Day. 
September 17, 1918 — Constitution Day. 
September 22. 1918— Heroes' Day. 



ABSTRACT OF VOTE 

For state officers, congressmen, judges, prosecuting attorneys and 
members of the General Assembly at the general election held on No- 
vember 5, 1918. 

In any case where party designation is not shovsrn in the following election re- 
turns, it is because the returns s^nt in by the cownty clerks did not disclose the politics 
pf the candidate. 



20 



Year Book 



SECRETARY OF STATE 



AUDITOR OF STATE 



Counties 



Adams 

Allen 

Bartholomew. 

Benton 

Blackford . . . 

Boone 

Brown 

Carroll 

Caps 

Clark 

Clay 

Clinton 

Crawford — 

Daviess 

Dearborn — 

Decatur 

Dekalb 

Delaware. . . 

Dubois 

Elkhart 

Fayette 

Floyd 

Fountain 

Franklin ... 
Fulton 

G'bson 

Grant 

Greene 

Hamilton.. . . 
Hancock .... 

Harrison .... 
Hendficka . . . 

Henry 

Howard 

Huntington.. 

Jackson 

Jasper 

Jay 

JelTerscn . . ^ . 
Jennings. . . 

Johnson.. . . . 

Knox 

Kosciusko . . . 
Lagrange — 
Lake 

Laporte 

Lawrence 

Madison. . . . 

Marion... .. . 

Marshall .... 

Martin 

Miami 

Monroe 

Montgomery. 
Morgan 

Newton. '. . . 

Noble 

Ohio 

Orange 

Owen . 



Herman L. 


William A. 


Isaac N. 


John W. 


Conter, 


Roach, 


Grisso, 


Kelley. 


Democrat 


Republican 


Prohibition 


Socialist 


2,119 


1,623 


69 


92 


8,560 


9,148 


137 


797 


2,791 


2,976 


38 


33 


1,029 


1,693 


28 


9 


1,450 


1,439 


72 


114 


3,028 


3,071 


91 


39 


721 


381 


13 


1 


1,788 


2,427 


47 


17 


4,091 


4,682 


102 


84 


3,240 


2,380 


35 


32 


3,178 


2,932 


48 


225 


3,170 


3,461 


96 


37 


1,21^ 


1,066 


70 


25 


2,582 


3,218 


54 


130 


2,304 


1,961 


51 


62 


1,922 


2,511 


55 


36 


2,741 


2,917 


117 


73 


4,553 


6,277 


116 


116 


2,312 


1,426 


15 


49 


4,207 


5,515 


201 


475 


1,604 


2,275 


27 


42 


3,262 


3,027 


44 


79 


2,037 


2,478 


124 


38 


1,895 


1,301 


32 


18 


1,855 


2,135 


129 


13 


3,100 


3,393 


103 


125 


4,401 


6,180 


324 


545 


3,530 


3,937 


78 


518 


1,929 


3,593 


163 


40 


2,394 


2,088 


80 


25 


1,959 


2,164 


54 


45 


1,979 


2,927 


48 


35 


2,416 


3,827 


294 


50 


2,249 


3,937 


178 


372 


2,927 


3,793 


162 


122 


2,492 


2,428 


92 


46 


1,072 


1,863 


25 


11 


2,669 


2,894 


157 


63 


1,948 


2,704 


64 


37 


1,353 


1,701 


35 


33 


2,549 


2,123 


82 


16 


4,260 


4,524 


68 


321 


2,592 


3,919 


115 


55 


1,027 


1,954 


49 


26 


6,169 


9,642 


147 


385 


3,758 


4,737 


51 


402 


2,035 


3,080 


40 


97 


5,912 


6,575 


200 


1,344 


20,126 


29,806 


341 


1,032 


2,680 


2,793 


98 


54 


1,276 


1,357 


15 


19 


3,121 


3,090 


171 


73 


2,197 


2,590 


37 


29 


3,287 


3,831 


70 


45 


2,272 


2,668 


58 


75 


933 


1,314 


28 


6 


2,430 


3,101 


53 


55 


625 


564 


20 


3 


1,617 


2,145 


25 


26 


1,504 


1,467 


33 


53 



William M. 

Jones, 
Democrat 



2,001 
8,546 
2,785 
1,004 
1,426 

3,036 
698 
1,889 
4,042 
3,202 

3,091 
3,180 
1,192 
2,547 



4,504 
2,262 
4,111 

1,570 
3,212 
2,035 
1,838 
1,856 

3,053 
4,495 
3,448 
1,893 
2,360 

1,908 
1,951 
2,414 
2,206 
2,895 

2,424 
1,042 
2,645 
1,937 
1,328 

2,534 
4,173 
2,556 
1,003 
6,115 

3,706 
1,993 
5,833 
20, 121 
2,628 



,243 
,081 
,136 
,263 
,221 

932 
,373 

618 
,568 



Otto L. 

Klauss, 

Republican 



1,593 
9,124 
2,977 
1,644 
1,413 

3,063 
374 
2,247 
4,292 
2,640 

2,853 
3,454 
1,042 
3,165 
1,900 

2,477 
2,864 



3,351 
5,924 
3,788 
3,508 
2,063 

2,116 
2,853 
3,806 
3,887 
3,734 

2,351 
1,808 
2,854 
2.672 
1,666 

2,124 
4,433 
3,851 
1,917 
9,533 



3,036 

6,454 

29,753 

2,754 

1,330 
3,049 
2,515 
3,823 
2,618 

1,315 
3,055 
553 
2,107 
1.440 



Elcharles 
A.DeVore, 
Prohibition 



70 
132 
36 
24 
63 

91 
11 
45 
99 
34 

48 
96 
67 
52 
48 

51 
112 
113 

14 



42 
124 

33 
130 

100 
306 

68 
155 

75 



289 
168 
160 



24 
150 
59 
32 

77 
62 

110 
46 

138 



197 

328 

95 

14 

162 
32 
63 
57 



27 



Secretary of State 



21 



SECREl'ARY OF STATE 



AUDITOR OP STATE 



Counties 


Herman L. 
Conter, 
Democrat 


William A. 

Roach. 
Republican 


Isaac N. 

Grisso, 

Prohibition 


John W. 
Kelley, 
Socialist 


William M. 

Jones, 
Democrat 


Otto L. 

Klauss, 

Republican 


Elcharles 
A. DeVore. 
Prohibition 


Bemice 
Marlow, 
Socialist 


Parke 


1,820 
1,714 
1,771 
1,184 

2,287 

1,130 
2,683 
1,875 
2,064 
2,118 

912 
3,222 
1,832 
1,010 
1,032 

6,559 
3,186 
1,324 
3,212 
1,958. 

716 
7,413 
1,884 
7,581 

2,282 

698 

2,028 

2,174 

3,346 
2,431 
1,778 
2,030 


2,478 
1.761 
1,970 
2,673 
2,103 

1,411 

2,378 
3,992 
2,452 
2,884 

786 
2,765 
2,241 
1,415 
2,320 

6,460 
2,318 
1,130 
5,178 
2,086 

935 

8,528 
1,947 
7,187 

3,555 
1,606 
2,303 
1,695 

5,081 
1,960 
2,407 
2,173 


104 
15 
33 
33 
62 

156 
48 

200 
44 
96 

20 
121 
60 
25 
125 

632 
101 
30 

78 
68 

29 

63 

72 

122 

151" 
29 

127 
30 

122 
125 
39 
80 


75 
17 
174 
82 
26 

15 
49 
44 
79 
23 

5 

37 
84 
49 
13 

289 

226 

16 

30 

25 

5 
208 
164 
313 

120 
21 
51 
15 

132 
34 
23 
34 


1,765 
1,666 
1,738 
1,145 
2,206 

1,136 
2,615 
1,849 
2,039 
2,086 

883 
3,166 
1,867 

984 
1,001 

6,536 
3,053 
1,309 
3,232 
1,942 

709 
7,306 
1,828 
7,450 

2,259 

665 

2,019 

2,121 

3,301 
2,354 
1,754 
1,994 


2,405 
1,723 
1,937 
2,547 
2,025 

1,413 
2,338 
3,913 
2,421 
2,853 

766 
2,734 
2,217 
1,385 
2,259 

6,495 
2,213 
1,119 
5, 159 
2,046 

919 

8,634 
1,877 
7,067 

3,498 
1,509 
2,302 
1,668 

4,989 
1,969 
2,338 
2,146 


98 
15 
32 
32 
59 

154 
39 

191 
44 
90 

20 
116 

58 
23 
119 

612 
100 
27 
78 
. 64 

28 
65 
69 
117 

143 
28 

130 
27 

120 
117 
39 
76 


69 


Perry 

Pike 


16 
169 


Porter 

Posey 

Pulaski 

Putnam 

Randolph 

Ripley 

Rush 

Scott 


73 
24 

18 
46 
41 

73 

22 

4 


Shelby 

Spencer 

Starke 

Steuben 

St. Joseph 

Sullivan 

Switzerland — 
Tippecanoe. . . . 
Tipton 

Union 


35 
79 
47 
12 

285 

214 

16 

30 

21 

6 


Vanderburgh.. 

Vermillion 

Vigo 


208 
146 
300 


Wabash 

Warren 

Warrir>k 

Washington — 

Wayne 

Wells 

White 

Whitley 


110 
18 
51 

13 

123 
28 
19 
33 


Total 


251,694 


301,207 


8,409 


11,297 


248,381 


296,710 


8,060 


10,821 



22 



Year Book 



TflEARURER OF STATE 



ATTORNEY-GENERAL 



COUNTIBS 



Adams 

Allen 

Bartholomew 

Benton 

Blackford . . . 

Boone 

Brown 

Carroll.. 

Oass 

Clark 

Clay 

Clinton 

Crawford — 

Daviess 

Dearborn — 

Decatur 

Dekalb 

Delaware. . . 

Dubois 

Elkhart 

Fayette 

Floyd 

Fountain. . . 
Franklin. . . . 
Fulton 

Gibson 

Grant 

Greene 

Hamilton. . . . 
Hancock . . , . 

Harrison. . . 
Hendricks. . 

Henry 

Howard 

Huntington. . 

Jackson 

Jasper 

Jay 

Jefferson . . . . 
I Bnnings . . . . 

Johnson 

Knox 

Kosciusko . . . 
Lagrange. . . . 
Lake 

Laporte 

Lawrence 

Madison. . . . 

Marion 

Marshall . . . . 

Martin 

Miami 

Monroe 

Montgomery 
Morotan. . . . 



Newton . 
Noble. . . 
OMo . 

Owei. . 



John B. 
McCarthy, 
Democrat 



1,979 
8,531 
2,780 
1,000 
1,425 

3,023 
696 
1,892 
4,022 
3,197 

3,087 
3,167 
1,184 
2,554 
2,226 

1,889 
2,688 
4,474 
2,260 
4,118 

1,569 
3,202 
2,027 
1,822 
1,855 

3,057 
4,289 
3,450 
1,896 
2,359 

1,906 
1,945 
2,465 
2,206 
2,893 

2,415 
1,044 
2,640 
1,932 
1,332 

2,538 
4,177 
2,548 
1,006 



3,702 
1,988 
5,803 
20,081 
2,627 

1,243 
3,080 
2,112 
3,250 
2,219 



2,372 
616 

1 , -';Q 



Uz 

McMurtry, 

Republican 



1,593 
9,130 
2,970 
1,641 
1,411 

3,076 
370 
2,244 
4,297 
2,639 

2,848 
3,463 
1,042 
3,160 

1,896 

2,478 
2,869 
6,115 
1,387 
5,365 

2,244 
2,945 
2,497 
1,272 

2,129 

3,342 
6,272 
3,789 
3,507 
2,062 

2,111 
2,855 
3,808 
3,892 
3,731 

2,356 
1,807 
2,848 
2,676 
1,663 

2,119 
4,427 
3,858 
1,913 
9,513 

4,580 
3,036 
6,474 
29,804 
2,740 

1,326 
3,046 
2,531 
3,827 
2,623 

1,315 
3,039 
554 
2,106 
1,441 



Richard D. 
Voorhees, 
Prohibition 



63 
139 
37 
24 
65 



11 

47 
102 
32 

53 
98 
67 
51 
49 

50 
112 
113 

15 
190 

27 
42 
124 
33 

128 

102 

306 

67 

154 

77 

48 
46 
289 
168 



152 

57 
32 

78 
61 

107 
48 

148 

49 
39 
195 
334 
94 

13 
163 
31 
65 
55 

29 
45 



Francis M. 
Wamples, 
Socialist 



77 
798 

32 

9 

109 

38 
1 
16 
79 
41 



36 

23 

118 

53 

35 
64 
98 
43 
458 

40 
68 
36 
16 
13 

118 

508 

490 

38 

23 

39 
27 
50 
363 
117 

43 
10 
57 
36 
32 

15 
307 
55 
26 
378 

372 

95 

,313 

,010 

54 

17 
71 
29 
45 



Evan B. 
Stotsenburg 
Democrat 



1,968 
8,521 
2,770 
992 
1,423 

3,030 
692 
1,878 
4,014 
3,202 

3,078 
3,172 
1,182 
2,536 
2,214 

1,886 
2,666 
4,471 
2,261 
4,104 

1,566 
3,412 
2,030 
1,818 
1,850 

3,051 
4,365 
3,430 
1,890 
2,352 

1,904 
1,946 
2,406 
2,198 

2,878 

2,383 
1,037 
2,626 
1,925 
1,322 

2,536 
4,150 
2,536 
1,000 



3,661 
1,986 
5,789 
20,152 
2,634 



218 



929 
2,067 

614 
1,564 
1,452 



Eli 
Stansbury, 
Republican 



1,599 
9,121 
2,780 
1,646 
1,415 

3,069 
354 
2,253 
4,303 
2,634 

2,861 
3,460 
1,045 
3,172 
1,903 

2,481 
2,896 
6,237 
1,383 
5,380 

2,245 

2,838 
2,488 
1,273 
2,138 

3,347 
6,101 
3,806 
3,506 
2,065 

2,111 

2,857 
3,805 
4,057 
3,753 

2,370 
1,814 
2,862 
2,679 
1,673 

2,131 
4,437 
3,867 
1,920 
9,514 

4,608 
3,038 
6,493 
29,791 
2,762 

1,330 
3,066 
2,519 
3,830 
2,622 

1,318 
3,043 
517 
2,190 
1,443 



Wm. Gray 

Lake, 
Prohibition 



PhiUip H. 

Doty, 

Socialist 



63 
135 
36 
24 
65 

92 
11 
47 
100 
33 

47 
97 
67 
53 
45 

48 
107 
113 

15 

188 

26 
41 

122 
36 

130 



317 
67 
153 

76 

50 

42 

289 

165 

155 

87 
23 
150 
57 
31 

75 
57 

113 
46 

140 



39 
195 
327 



13 
160 

32 
64 
54 

27 
43 
19 
23 
29 



Secretary of State 



23 



TREASURER OF STATE 



ATTORNEY-GENERAL 



Counties 


John B. 
McCarthy, 
Democrat 


Uz 
McMurtry, 
Republican 


Richard D. 
Vowhees. 
Prohibition 


Francis M. 
Wamples. 
Socialist 


Evan B. 
Stotsenburg 
Democrat 


Eli 
Stansbury, 
Republican 


Wm. Gray 

Lake, 
Prohibition 


Phillip H. 

Doty, 

SociaUat 


Parke 

Perry 

Pike 

Porter 

Posey 

Pulaski 

Putnam 

Randolph 

Ripley 

Rush 

Scott . 


1,763 
1,666 
1,737 
1,134 
2,210 

1,135 
2,615 
1,841 
2,044 
2,090 

881 

3,172 

1,802 

983 

999 

6,543 
3,036 
1,311 
3,228 
1,906 

704 
7,417 
1,822 
7,385 

2,256 

666 

2,017 

2,111 

3,296 
2,350 
1,748 
1,991 


2,406 
1,719 
1,938 
2,561 
2,010 

1,401 
2,342 
3,919 
2,419 
2,852 

766 
2,733 
2,191 
1,381 
2,259 

6,348 
2,214 
1,120 
5,160 
2,068 

922 
8.531 
1,877 
-7,063 

3,494 
1,510 
2,297 
1,661 

4,970 
1,919 
2,337 
2,147 


99 
15 
31 
30 

57 

156 
39 

193 
44 
91 

20 
116 
59 


69 
15 
169 
72 
24 

17 
45 
40 
73 
22 

4 

34 
79 


1,755 
1,660 
1,724 
1,124 
2,201 

1,134 
2,605 
1,840 
2,039 
2,082 

878 

3,146 

1,788 

984 

996 

6,488 
3,011 
1,306 
3,216 
1,925 

705 
7,406 
1,816 
7,403 

2,257 

664 

2,011 

2,114 

3,284 
2,336 
1,741 
1,989 


2,416 
1,725 
1,947 
2,565 
2,016 

1,404 
2,345 
3,922 
2.418 
2,854 

768 
2,739 
2,204 
1,380 
2,263 

6,366 
2,221 
1,121 
5,170 
2,051 

924 
8,551 
1,876 
7,088 

3,499 
1,523 
2,313 
1,665 

4,977 
1,932 
2,345 
2,143 


94 
13 
31 
29 
56 

153 
39 

193 
43 
90 

19 
119 
55 


68 
16 
168 
75 
24 

18 
46 
40 
74 
22 

6 


Shelby 

Spencer 

Starke 


35 
80 


Steuben 

St. Joseph 

Sullivan. 

Switzerland.... 

Tippecanoe 

Tipton 

Union 


118 

614 
99 
27 
78 
62 

28 
66 
68 
116 

142 
27 
129 

27 

123 
115 
35 

78 


12 

282 

213 

16 

30 

20 

5 
207 
148 
299 

111 
19 
51 
14 

123 
30 
18 
32 


117 

612 
98 
29 
79 
65 

29 
63 
66 
116 

140 
28 

127 
26 

117 
114 
32 
98 


11 

284 

213 

17 

30 

21 

6 


Vanderburgh... 

Vermillion 

Vigo 

Wahash 

Warren 

Warrick 

Washington.... 

Wayne 

Wells 


209 
145 
305 

111 
18 
51 
14 

122 
28 


White 


18 


Whitley 


33 


Total.... 


247,769 


296,607 


8,062 


10,741 


247.116 


296,950 


7,986 


10,900 



24 



Year Book 



CLFRK OF SUPREME COURT 



STATE SUPERINTENDENT OP 
PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



Counties 


Samuel L. 
Calloway, 
Democrat 


Patrick J. 

Lynch, 
Republican 


Jesse T. 

Mitchell, 

Prohibition 


Frank S. 
La Monte, 
Socialist 


Willis A. 

Fox, 
Democrat 


Linnaeus 
N. Hines, 
Republican 


Elizabeth 
T. Stanley, 
Prohibition 


Andrew J. 

Hart, 

Socialist 


Adams 

Allen 


1.987 
8,555 
2,787 
1,002 
1,430 


1,585 
9,100 
2,968 
1,639 
1,405 


66 
131 
38 
24 
65 


74 
796 

32 

9 

107 


1,998 
8,590 
2,775 
994 
1,413 


1,573 
9,071 
2,972 
1,642 
1,414 


67 
136 
39 
28 
65 


76 
796 


Bartholomew... 

Benton 

Blackford 


32 

9 

109 


Boone 

Brown 

CarroU 

Cass 


3,029 
695 
1,905 
4,130 
3,186 


3,068 
373 
2,230 
4,177 
2,644 


91 
11 
45 
102 
34 


38 
1 

16 
80 
39 


3,031 
697 
1,887 
4,032 
3,185 


3,070 
372 
2,242 
4,278 
2,641 


92 

12 

46 

104 

• 35 


37 

1 
16 
80 


Clark 


41 


Clay 

Clinton 

Crawford 

Daviess 

Dearborn 


3,083 
3,178 
1,184 
2,540 
2,223 


2,858 
3,457 
1,044 
3,165 
1,896 


44 
96 
67 
56 
45 


202 
36 
23 

118 
52 


3,076 
3,175 
1,184 
2,535 
2,220 


2,863 
3,458 
1,045 
3,167 
1,899 


45 
99 
67 
53 
46 


197 
36 
23 

119 
53 


Decatur 

Dekalb 

Delaware 

Dubois 

Elkhart 


1,882 
2,690 
4,473 
2,263 
4,107 


2,479 
2,871 
6,232 
1,380 
5,369 


52 
111 
110 

17 
199 


35 
64 

118 
42 

457 


1,883 
2,704 
4,464 
2,256 
4,121 


2,479 
2,858 
6,233 
1,388 
5.353 


51 
116 
116 

15 
197 


35 

64 

118 

44 

457 


Fayette 

Flovd 


1,592 
3,208 
2,031 
1,810 
1,865 


2,203 
2,938 
2,476 
1,265 
2,131 


28 
45 

123 
39 

131 


41 
68 
36 
15 
13 


1,568 
3,194 
2,024 
1,815 
1,854 


2.240 
2.955 
2.481 
1.265 
2,130 


29 
43 

123 
37 

131 


40 
67 


Fountain 

Franklin 

Fulton 


37 
18 
14 


Gibson 

Grant 


3,058 
4,396 
3,429 
1,890 
2,395 


3,336 
6,060 
3,795 
3,497 
1,991 


101 

326 

73 

153 

85 


120 
518 
486 
38 
23 


3,061 
4,393 
3,444 
1,889 
2,352 


3,342 
6.050 
3,783 
3.509 
2,058 


97 
340 

72 
157 

80 


119 
516 


Greene 


485 


Hamilton 

Hancock 


38 
24 


Harrison 

Hendricks 

Henry 

Howard 

Huntington 


1,900 
1,952 
2,492 
2,199 
2,889 


2,110 
2,843 
3,674 
3,878 
3,735 


53 

43 

309 

168 

161 


40 
27 
51 
365 
119 


1,897 
1,948 
2.414 
2,198 
2,887 


2,113 
2,854 
3,799 
3,879 
3,731 


51 
41 
291 
174 
162 


40 

27 

49 

366 

117 


Jackson 

Jasper 

Jav 


2,405 
1,038 
2,638 
1,939 
1,330 


2,348 
1,810 
2,845 
2,660 
1,659 


87 
25 
154 
58 
32 


41 
10 

58 
37 
32 


2,407 
1,036 
2,638 
1,929 
1,325 


2,364 
1,814 
2,851 
2,672 
1,668 


87 
23 
157 
60 
31 


42 
10 
58 


Jefferson 

Jennings 


36 

32 


Johnson 

Knox 

Kosciusko 

f ?: 


2,537 
4,166 
2,544 
1,003 
6,118 


2,127 
4,421 
3,856 
1,914 
9,502 


78 
61 

109 
47 

141 


16 

305 

54 

26 

376 


2,530 
4,166 
2,547 
1,027 
6,105 


2, 119 
4,409 
3,849 
1,895 
9,502 


79 
60 

110 
47 

149 


16 

305 

55 

24 

370 


Laporte 

Lawrence 

Madison 

Marion 

Marshall 


3,678 
1,928 
5,794 
20,184 
2,624 


4,594 
3,037 
6,486 
29,699 
2,754 


53 
41 
196 
331 
95 


372 

94 

1,317 

1,027 

54 


■ 3,662 
1,992 
5,816 

20,111 
2,626 


4,609 

3,032 

6,462 

29,792 

2,742 


46 
40 
198 
334 
99 


372 

95 

1,293 

1,020 

55 


Martin 

Miami 

Monroe 

Montgomery. . . 
Morgan 


1,238 
3,078 
2,126 
3.264 
2,224 


1,330 
3,039 
2,512 
3,819 
2,614 


13 

164 
32 
65 
55 


17 

76 
29 
43 
69 


1,242 
3,066 
2,110 
3,180 
2,221 


1,330 
3,051 
2,525 
3,899 
2,618 


13 
162 
31 
62 
54 


17 
72 
29 
44 
69 


Newton 

Noble . . 


933 
2,366 

617 
1,577 
1.459 


1,309 
3,042 
553 
2,106 
1.435 


29 
45 
20 
23 
29 


7 
49 

3 
25 
50 


927 
2,458 

615 
1,565 
1.457 


1,311 
2,961 
555 
2,108 
1.437 


39 
42 
20 
23 
29 


6 
50 


Ohio 


3 


Orange 

Owen 


25 
51 



Secretary of State 



25 



CLERK OF SUPREME COURT 



STATE SUPERINTENDENT OF 
PUBLIC INSTRUCTION 



Counties 


1 

'Samuel L. 
j Calloway, 
' Democrat 


Patrick J. 

Lynch. 
Republican 


Jesse T. 

Mitchell, 
Prohibition 


Franks. 
La Monte, 
Socialist 


Willis A. 

Fox, 
Democrat 


Linnaeus 
N. ffines. 
Republican 


Elizabeth 
T. Stanley, 
Prohibition 


Andrew J. 

Hart, 

Socialist 


Parke 

Perry 


1,761 
1,665 
1.732 
1,132 
2,208 


2,402 
1.719 
1,942 
2,550 
2,006 


98 
13 
30 
35 

58 


69 
17 
167 
73 
25 


1,762 
1,668 
1,726 
1,130 
2,206 


2,407 
1,721 
1,946 
2,548 
2,011 


98 
14 
33 
33 
58 


68 
16 


Pike 


167 


Porter 

Poeey 


73 
25 


Pulaski 

Putnam 

Randolph 

Ripley 

Rush 


1,139 
2,607 
1,832 
2,042 
2,097 


1,400 
2,338 
3,924 
2,419 
2,826 


154 
39 

192 
45 
97 


18 
45 
41 
74 
22 


1,142 
2,605 
1.823 
2,043 
2,085 


1,397 
2,340 
3.935 
2,418 
2,850 


153 
40 

198 
44 

92 


16 
45 
41 
74 
22 


Scott 


882 
3,185 

1,762 

984 

1,003 


768 
2,687 
2,238 
1,374 
2,256 


20 
119 

58 
23 
119 


34 

81 

il 


886 
3,161 
1,791 

981 
1,137 


763 
2.731 
2,199 
1.382 
2,138 


20 
118 
59 
27 
110 


4 


Shelby 

Spencer 

Starke 

Steuben 


33 

79 

46 

9 


St. Joseph 

SuUivan 

Switzerland... . 

Tipperanoe 

Tipton 


6,495 
3,023 
1,310 
3,225 
1,937 


6,472 
2,199 
1,117 
5,164 
2,042 


608 
100 
28 
81 
67 


288 

213 

16 

30 

22 


6.497 
3,026 
1,308 
3,227 
1,929 


6,345 
2,212 
1,122 
5,160 
2,046 


603 
100 
28 
79 
66 


286 

212 

17 

30 

21 


Union 

Vanderburgh.. . 

Vermillion 

\lgo 


704 
7,426 
1,818 
7,415 


919 
8,530 

1,880 
7,084 


30 
64 
68 
116 


7 
209 
148 
307 


701 
7,416 
1,822 
7,334 


917 
8,539 
1,871 
7,082 


35 

66 

70 

115 


6 
207 
147 
304 


Wabash 

Warren 

Warrick 

Washington.... 


2,268 

666 

2,020 

2,121 


3,486 
1,508 
2,297 
1,659 


137 
27 
127 

28 


102 
18 
51 
13 


2.266 

662 

2,013 

2,108 


3.480 
1.507 

2.297 
1,666 


151 
27 
130 

28 


110 
18 
50 
13 


Wayne 

Weils 


3,342 
2,349 
1,843 
1,997 


4,890 
1,922 
2,254 
2,139 


138 
115 
33 

77 


125 
29 
19 
33 


3,290 
2.343 
1,738 
1,998 


4,967 
1,915 
2,346 
2,136 


131 
117 
34 
75 


124 
30 


White.. 


18 


Whitley 


32 


Total 


248,287 


295,754 


8,169 


10,843 


247,740 


296,176 


8,201 


10,792 



26 



Year Book 



STATE GBOLOGTST 



JUDGE SUPREME COURI 
FIRST DISTRICT 



Counties 



Allen 

Bartholomew. 

BentoD 

Blackford... 

Boone 

Brown 

Carroll 

Ca88 

Clark 

Clay 

Gin ton 

Crawford 

Daviess 

Dearborn. . . . 

Decatur 

Dekalb 

Delaware 

Dubois 

Elkhart 

Fayette 

Floyd 

Fountain 

Franklin 

Fulton 

Gibson 

Grant 

Greene 

Hamilton 

Hancock .... 

Harrison 

Hendricks . . . 

Henry 

Howard 

Huntington. . 

Jackson 

Jaaper 

Jay 

Jefferson 

Jennings. . . . 

Johnson 

Knox 

Kosciusko . . . 

Lagrange 

Lake 

Laporte 

Lawrence 

Madison 

Marion 

Marshall 

Martin 

Miami 

Monroe 

Montgomery. 
Morgan 

Newton 

Noble 

Ohio 

Orange — . 
Owen 



Edward 
Barrett, 
Democrat 



1,976 
8,568 
2,774 
1,002 
1,416 

3,036 
696 
1,887 
4,034 
3,182 

3,076 
3,175 
1,181 
2,555 
2,223 

1,883 
2,681 
4,465 
2,264 
4,106 

1,567 
3,194 
2,026 
1,813 

1,848 

3,055 
4,381 
3,420 
1,895 
2,358 

1,898 
1,958 
2,407 
2,202 



2,415 
1,051 
2,636 
1,925 
1,322 

2,530 
4,159 
2,544 
1,006 



3,700 
1,984 
5,805 
20, 138 
2,617 

1,238 
3,071 
2,120 
3,267 
2,227 



2,371 

616 

1,563 

1,453 



Louis 

Roark, 

Republican 



1,568 
9.103 
2,969 
1,641 
1,411 

3,064 
374 
2,242 
4,275 
2,637 

2,857 
3,458 
1,045 
3,162 
1,891 

2,478 
2,868 
6,214 
1,376 
5,369 



2,953 
2,475 
1,272 
2,135 

3,340 
6,062 
3,784 
2,495 
2,059 

2,111 

2.837 
3,804 
3,877 
3,738 

2,848 
1,802 
2,850 
2,676 
1.672 

2.122 
4,413 
3,853 
1,912 
9,512 

4,563 

3,031 

6,404 

29,751 

2,748 

1,328 
3,046 
2,517 
3,818 
2,614 

1,315 
3,037 
553 
2,107 
1,440 



Oliver P. 

Shaffer. 

Prohibition 



68 
132 
38 
24 
66 

91 
12 
45 
95 
34 

42 
94 
67 
53 
48 

50 
113 
116 

14 



27 
42 
122 
33 

129 

101 
325 

71 
153 

75 

51 

42 



161 



22 
149 
56 
31 

76 
61 

107 
45 

144 

46 
39 
192 
323 
95 



Stephen C. 
Garrison. 
Socialist 



77 
790 

32 

9 

105 

38 

16 
80 
42 

196 
36 
23 

118 
52 

35 
67 

117 
42 

456 

40 
69 
37 
16 
13 

117 
517 
495 



40 
27 
49 
363 
116 

42 
10 



16 
304 
54 



372 

94 

1,316 

1,019 

54 

17 
72 



John C. 

McNutt. 

Democrat 



1,964 
8,566 
2,780 
997 
1,422 

3,033 
699 
1,889 
4,035 
3,178 

3,097 
3,187 
1,180 
2,541 
2,214 

1,884 
2,680 
4,474 
2,261 
4,114 



3,193 
2,033 
1,824 
1,851 

3,057 
4,390 
3,430 
1,897 
2.352 

1,896 
1,946 
2,414 
2,198 
2,884 



,404 



1, 
2,639 
1,930 
1,325 

2,545 
4,049 
2,550 
1,008 
6,081 

3,677 
1,982 
5,797 
20, 122 
2,618 

1,240 
3,073 
2,134 
3,262 

2,287 



2,373 



1,557 
1.460 



Benj. M. 
Willoughby, 
RepubUcan 



1,585 
9,112 
2,972 
1,644 
1,410 

3,074 
370 
2,245 
4,288 
2,643 

2,768 
3,463 
1,048 
3,167 
1.897 



2,877 
6,228 
1,382 
5,370 

2,245 
2,953 
2,482 
1,273 
2,137 

3,341 
6,086 
3,785 
3,510 
2,074 

2,119 

2,857 
3,810 
3,889 
3,763 

2,359 
1,810 
2,867 
2,677 
1,674 

2,129 
4,575 
3,861 
1,913 
9,520 

4,596 
3,036 
6,472 
29,805 
2,767 

1,328 
3,059 
2,505 
3,846 
2,561 

1,321 
3,040 
553 
2,114 
1,443 



Secretary op State 



27 



STATE GEOLOGIST 



JUDGE SUPREME Cr)URT 
FIRST district 



Counties 


Edward 
Barrett, 
Democrat 


Louis 

Roark, 

Republican 


OUver P. 

Shaffer, 

Prohibition 


Stephen C. 
Garrison, 
Socialist 


John C. 

McNutt, 

Democrat 


Benj. M. 
WUloughby, 
Republican 


Willis V. 
Sinuns, 
Socialist 


Parke 

Perry 

Pike 

Porter 

Posey 

Pulaski 

Putnam 

Randolph 

Ripley 

Rush 

Scott 

Shelby 

Spencer 

Starke 

Steuben 

St. Joseph 

SulUvan 

Switzerland.... 

Tippecanoe 

Tipton 

Union 

Vanderburgh. . . 

Vermillion 

Vigo 

Wabash 

Warren 

Warrick 

Washington — 

Wayne 

Wella 

White 

Whitley 


1,758 
1,659 
1,733 
1,135 
2,204 

1,132 
2,605 
1,844 
2,038 
2,085 

879 
3,152 
1,796 

983 
1,002 

6,518 
3,014 
1,308 
3,232 
1,932 

709 
7,425 
1,819 
7,426 

2,260 

666 

2,021 

2,109 

3,289 
2,338 
1,751 
1,992 


2,407 
1,724 
1,939 
2,537 
2,009 

1,397 
2,341 
3,911 
2,421 
2,852 

769 
2,734 
2,194 
1,378 
2,256 

6,323 
2,214 
1,119 
5,155 
2,040 

919 
8,530 
1,936 
7,057 

3,489 
1,504 
2,297 
1,660 

4,957 
1,924 
2,331 
2,141 


98 
13 
30 
33 
57 

154 
39 

190 
43 
89 

20 
116 
57 
23 
119 

597 
96 
28 
78 
64 

28 
63 
68 
114 

142 
27 
126 

27 

118 
117 
35 

77 


68 
16 
167 
73 
25 

15 
45 
40 

74 
22 

4 
33 
79 

t; 

286 

210 

16 

30 

21 

5 
208 
144 
303 

110 
19 
49 
14 

121 
28 
18 
32 


1,763 
1,660 
1,732 
1,131 
2,206 

1,142 
2,613 
1,837 
2,040 
2,081 

881 

3,156 

1,799 

980 

996 

6,475 
3,032 
1,311 
3,227 
1,932 

706 
7,429 
1,814 
7,447 

2,261 

666 

2,023 

2,104 

3,293 
2,347 
1,754 
1,996 


2,410 
1,723 
1,940 
2,560 
2,014 

1,405 
2,337 
3,912 
2,420 
2,858 

765 
2,734 
2,199 
1,382 
2,271 

6,341 
2,210 
1,117 
5,166 
2,046 

924 
8,533 
1,882 
7,064 

3,504 
1,502 
2,300 
1,669 

4,958 
1,921 
2,337 
2,141 


69 
16 
167 
73 
26 

15 
45 
40 

74 
22 

4 
34 
79 
47 
10 

276 

215 

16 

30 

23 

6 
208 
146 
306 

108 
18 
50 
13 

120 
30 
18 
32 


Total 


247,667 


295,079 


7,996 


10,794 


247,664 


296,729 


10,765 



28 



Year Book 



JUDGE SUPREME COURT 
FOURTH DISTRICT 



JUDGE APPELLATE COURT 
FIRST DISTRICT 



Counties 


James J. 

Moran, 

Democrat 


Howard L. 
Townsend, 
Republican 


Hiram 
Cousins, 
Socialist 


Milton B. 

Hottel, 
Democrat 


Solon A. 

Enloe, 

Republican 


Herbert C. 
Miller, 
Socialist 


Adams 

Allen 

Bartholomew 

Benton 

Blackford 


2,063 
8,543 
2,782 
996 
1,418 


1,540 
9,153 
2,965 
1,645 
1,413 


74 
789 

33 

9 

106 . 


1,972 
8,562 
2,769 
1,000 
1,424 


1,540 
9,116 
2,956 
1,639 
1,407 


77 
788 

32 

9 

107 


Boone 

Brown 

CarroU 

Cass 

Clark 


3,034 
685 
1,889 
4,011 
3,175 


3,074 
371 
2,247 
4,302 
2,646 


38 
1 

16 
79 
40 


3,030 

697 
1,892 
4,039 
3,180 


3,077 
371 
2,240 
4,275 
2,639 


38 
1 

17 
81 
40 


Clay 

Clinton 

Crawford 

Daviess 


3,076 
3,183 
1,182 
2,542 
2,212 


2,856 
3,468 
1,049 
3,165 
1,896 


192 
36 
23 

118 

55 


3,068 
3,186 
1,181 
2,538 
2,216 


2,857 
3,466 
1,095 
3,164 
1,894 


149 
36 
23 

116 


Dearborn 


53 


Decatur 

Dekalb 

Delaware 

Dubois 

Elkhart 


1,885 
2,671 
4,470 
2,261 
4,109 


2,485 
2,891 
6,213 
1,379 
5,375 


35 
64 

116 
42 

457 


1,880 
2,877 
4,460 
2,261 
4,112 


2,487 
2,873 
6,206 
1,377 
5,366 


35 
67 

116 
44 

463 


Fayette , 

Floyd ' 

Fountaiu 

Franklin 

Fulton 


1,561 
3,188 
2,034 
1,811 
1,856 


2,250 
2,960 
2,484 
1,274 
2,134 


39 
68 
38 
15 
13 


1,560 
3,194 
2,031 
1,816 
1,856 


2,244 
2,942 
2,479 
1,270 
2,134 


40 
70 
39 
16 
12 


Gibson 

Grant 

Greene 

Hamilton 

Hancock 


3,048 
4,376 
3,424 
1,897 
2,352 

■ 
1,894 
1,937 
2,404 
2,215 
2,890 


3,345 
6,100 
3.784 
3,510 
2,067 

2,120 
2,866 
3,813 
3,888 
3,757 


118 

525 

487 
38 
23 

40 
26 
48 
365 
121 


3,058 
4,380 
3,420 
1,894 
2,350 

1,901 
1,926 
2,405 
2,209 

2,888 


3,340 
6,085 
3,779 
3,508 
2,066 

2,113 

2,877 
3,810 
3,884 
3,755 


120 

516 

489 

38 

23 


Harrison 

Hendricks 

Henry 

Howard 

Huntington 


40 

24 

49 

365 

i;8 


Jackson 

Jasper 

Jay 


2,404 
1,043 
2,643 
1,920 
1,325 


2,359 
1,805 
2,875 
2,680 
1,674 


41 
10 
55 
36 
31 


2,404 
1,043 
2,642 
1,939 
1,325 


2,358 
1,807 
2,860 
2,674 
1,671 


42 
10 
59 


JeSerson 


36 


.Ip,nning.<? 


31 


Johnson 

TCnnY . . 


2,539 
4,156 
2,546 
1,009 
6,105 


2,132 
4,417 
3,864 
1,915 
9,576 


14 

305 

54 

26 

374 


2,534 
4,148 
2,548 
1,005 
6,204 


2,127 
4,412 
3,859 
1,919 
9,524 


15 
306 


Kosciusko 

LT°f:;:::;::,::;::: 


54 
26 
373 


Laporte. 


3,673 
1,984 
5,796 
20,101 
2,617 


4,602 
3,035 
6,478 
29,837 
2,756 


372 

95 

1,314 

1,017 

54 


3,669 
1,992 
5,792 
20, 149 
2,612 


4,588 
3,027 
6,471 
29,788 
2,754 


380 


Lawrence...*. 

Madison 

Marion 

Marshall 


95 
1,317 
1,019 

54 


Martin 

Miami 

Monroe 

Montgomery 

Morgan 


1,239 
3,068 
2,121 
3,265 
2,219 


1,328 
3,061 
2,519 

3,828 
2,618 


17 

75 
29 
42 
66 


1,242 
3,070 
2,138 
3,256 
2,217 


1,325 
3,054 
2,501 
3,817 
2,621 


17 
76 
29 
44 
68 


Newton 

Noble . ... 


933 
2,364 

615 
1,559 
1,453 


1,323 
3,048 
554 
2,113 
1,442 


6 
51 

3 

25 
50 


934 
2,355 

616 
1,567 
1,454 


1,320 
3,056 
554 
2,108 
1,442 


6 
50 


Ohio 

Orange 

Owen 


3 

25 
50 



Secretary of State 



29 



JUDGE .SOPREME COUKT 
FOUftTH DISTRICT 



JUDGE APPELI.A'JB COUKT 
FIRST DISTRICT 



Counties 



Parke 

Perry 

Pike 

Porter 

Posey 

Pulaski 

Putnam 

Randolph . . . 

Ripley 

Rush 

Scott 

Shelby 

Spencer 

Starke 

Steuben 

St. Joseph . . . 

Sullivan 

Switzerland.. 
Tippecanoe. . 
Tipton. 

Union 

Vanderburgh. 
Vermillion. . . 
Vigo 

Wabash 

Warren 

Warrick 

Washington.. 

Wayne 

WeUs 

White 

Whitley 

Total... 



J. 

Moran, 
Democrat 



1,767 
1,657 
1,730 
1,123 
2,198 

1,140 
2,600 
1,840 
2,036 
2,080 

881 

3,157 

1,792 

982 

997 



3,013 
1,312 
3,227 
1,925 

708 
7,427 
1,816 
7,413 

2,265 

665 

2,016 

2,106 



3,281 
2,334 
1,748 
1,996 



248,443 



Howard L. 
Townsend, 
Republican 



2,408 
1,727 
1,941 
2,570 
2,015 

1,405 
2,339 
3,911 
2,424 
2,853 

769 
2,737 
2,198 
1,381 
2,275 

6,334 
2,219 
1,118 
5,168 



923 
,535 
,876 
,074 

,494 
,505 
,299 



4,980 
1,936 
2,340 
2,140 



296,935 



Hiram 
Cousins, 
Socialist 



15 
166 
73 
26 

16 
45 
42 

74 
22 

4 
35 

79 
47 
10 

278 

213 

16 



5 
207 
147 
300 

111 
18 
49 
14 

121 
29 
18 
33 



10,784 



Milton B. 

Hottel, 
Democrat 



1,759 
1,653 
1,726 
1,131 

2,198 

1,143 
2,602 
1,835 
2,039 
2,083 



3,152 

1,788 

980 

1,000 



2,999 
1,310 
3,225 
1,930 

704 
7,426 
1,812 
7,390 

2,260 

665 

2,021 

2,146 

3,281 
2,338 
1,750 
1,997 



247,678 



Solon A. 

Enloe, 

Republican 



2,410 
1,724 
1,942 
2,547 
2,015 

1,405 
2,341 
3,899 
2,421 
2,854 

769 
2,732 



2,266 

6,328 
2,210 
1,117 
5,172 
2,045 

923 
8,537 
1,877 
7,070 

3,530 
1,502 
2,301 
1,646 

4,956 
1,918 
2,335 
2.137 



296,475 



Herbert C. 
MiUer, 
Socialist 



70 
16 

167 
71 
25 

15 
45 
41 
74 
21 

4 
34 

88 
48 
10 

274 

212 

16 

30 

23 



208 
146 
302 

111 
18 
49 
14 

123 
28 
18 
32 



10,775 



30 



Year Book 



JUDGE .VPPETXATE COURT 
FIRST DISTRICT 



JUDGE APPELL\TE f ;URT 
SECOND DISTRICT 



Counties 



Adams 

Men 

Bartholomew. 

Benton 

Blackford . . . 

Boone 

Brown 

Carroll 

Cass 

Clark 

Clay 

Clinton 

Crawford 

Daviess 

Dearborn.. . . 

Decatur 

Dekalb 

Delaware 

Dubois 

ELkhart 

Fayette 

Floyd 

Fountain 

Franklin .... 
Fulton 

Gibson 

Grant 

Greene 

Hamilton — 
Hancock. . . . 

Harrison .... 
Hendricks . . . 

Henry 

Howard 

Huntington.. 

Jackson 

Jasper 

Jay 

Jefferson .... 
Jennings. . . . 

Johnson 

Knox. . . 

Kosciusko . . . 

Lagrange 

Lake 

Laporte 

Lawrence — 

Madison 

Marion, 

Marshall 

Martin 

Miami 

Monroe 

Montgomery. 
Morgan 

Newton ... . 

Noble 

Ohio 

Orange 

Owen 



Hugh D. 
Wickens, 
Democrat 



1,913 
8,562 
2,756 
993 
1,419 

3,032 
694 
1,938 
4,026 
3,172 

3,068 
3,187 
1,181 
2,530 
2,211 

1,907 
2,671 
4,450 
2,253 
4,103 

1,560 
3,180 
2,026 
1,818 
1,856 

3,053 
4,372 
3,410 

1,893 
2,357 

1,898 
1,938 
2,401 
2,200 

2,877 

2,387 
1,041 
2,643 
1,919 
1,337 

2,532 
4,142 
2,542 
1,006 



3,673 
1,983 
5,778 
20,060 
2,611 

1,237 
3,066 
2,113 
3,260 
2,221 

934 
2,364 

617 
1,569 
1,450 



Chas. F. 

Remy, 

Republican 



1,554 
9,105 
2,996 
1,649 
1,410 

3,076 
372 
2,241 
4,283 
2,636 

2,864 
3,466 
1,094 
3,167 
1,896 

2,474 
2,877 
6,195 
1,378 
5,378 

2,244 
2,957 
2,477 
1,271 
2,137 

3,340 
6,079 
3,786 
3,502 
2,057 



2,137 
4,419 
3,864 
1,916 
9,525 

4,582 
3,027 
6,493 
29, 777 
2,752 

1,328 
3,051 
2,519 
3, .812 
2,636 

1,320 
3,046 
554 
2,109 
1,441 



William 
Sheffler, 
Socialist 



76 
784 

31 

9 

108 

38 

1 

16 



200 
36 
23 

118 
51 



117 
43 



40 
69 
36 
14 
12 

120 

518 

490 

38 

23 

40 



365 
117 

41 
10 
57 
36 
30 

14 

306 

54 

26 

379 

377 

95 

1,313 

1,023 

52 



44 



Frederick S. 
Caldwell, 
Democrat 



1,960 
8,562 
2,784 
996 
1,416 

3,034 
696 
1,879 
4,045 
3,170 

3,066 
3,190 
1,180 
2,536 
2,215 

1,881 
2,670 
4,465 
2,259 
4,113 

1,563 
3,184 
2,024 
1,811 
1,855 

3,056 
4,379 
3,411 
1,895 
2,356 

1,894 
1,941 
2,404 
2,208 

2,884 

2,385 
1,038 
2,644 
1,925 
1,325 

2,541 
4,142 
2,544 
1,007 
6,024 

3,671 
1,985 
5,785 
20, 146 
2,616 

1,238 
3,069 
2,119 
3,254 
2,218 

934 
2,376 

616 
1,559 
1.455 



Willis C. 
McMahan, 
Republican 



1,574 
9,115 
2,961 
1,640 
1,399 

3,074 
372 
2,253 
4,269 
2,644 

2,859. 
3,464 
1,044 
3,165 
1,894 

2,484 
2,880 
6,196 
1,377 
5,367 

2,245 
2,945 
2,463 
1,273 
2,138 

3,339 
6,079 
3,785 
3,508 
2,057 

2,116 
2,858 
3,808 
3,891 
3,756 

2,355 
1,808 
2,857 
2,677 
1,669 

2,127 
4,420 
3,861 
1,916 
9,602 

4,591 
3,029 
6,482 
29,786 
2,745 

1,328 
3,049 
2,512 
3,814 
2,616 

1,318 
3,034 
554 
2,110 
1,443 



Peter G. 
Keely, 
Socialist 



77 

789 

33 

16 



118 

52 

35 
65 

114 
43 

463 

40 
68 
37 
15 
13 

118 

517 

486 

38 

23 

40 
26 
48 
365 
117 

41 
11 
55 



14 

308 

54 

26 

373 

373 

95 

1,277 

1,017 

56 



Secretary of State 



81 



» 



JUDGE APPELLATE COURT 
FIRST DISTRICT 



JCDGE APPELLATE COURT 
SECOND DISTiaCT 



Counties 



Parke 

Perry 

Pike 

Porter 

Pos^ 

Pulaski 

Putnam 

Randolph . . 

Ripley 

Rush 

Scott 

Shelby 

Spencer 

Starke 

Steuben 

St. Joseph. . . 

Sullivan 

Switzerland.. 
Tippecanoe . . 
Tipton 

Union 

Vanderburgh. 
Vermillion... 
Vigo 

Wabash 

Warren 

Warrick 

Washington.. 

Wayne. 

Wells 

White 

itle 

Total 



Hugh D. 
Wickens, 
Democrat 



1,763 
1,654 
1,725 
1,120 
2,194 

1,141 

2,595 
1,830 
2,046 
2,079 

878 

3,147 

1,791 

982 

997 



1,306 
3,225 
1,925 

703 
7,426 
1,811 
7,394 

2,257 

664 

2,020 

2,096 

3,269 
2,329 
1,747 
1,995 



246,971 



Chas. F. 

Remy, 

Republican 



2,407 
1,723 
1,941 
2,553 
2,016 

1,407 
2,347 
3,893 
2,413 

2,857 

768 
2,736 
2,199 
1,379 
2,270 

6,320 
2,214 
1,117 
5,168 
2,050 

926 
8,541 
1,877 
7,064 

3,532 
1,503 
2,302 
1,660 

4,969 
1,927 
2,348 
2,137 



296,651 



William 
Sheffler, 
Socialist 



16 
167 
74 
25 

15 
45 
40 

72 
22 



35 
79 
47 
10 

277 

214 

16 

30 

22 



143 
302 



111 
18 



122 
29 
18 
33 



10,791 



Frederick S. 
CaldweU, 
Democrat 



1,764 
1,654 
1,728 
1,128 
2,197 

1,143 
2,601 
1,944 
2,038 
2,086 

879 
3,144 
1.802 

982 
1,002 

6,414 
2,998 
1,310 
3,228 
1,934 

708 
7,426 
1,813 
7,432 

2,257 

666 

2,026 



3,282 
2,332 
1,749 
1,995 



Willis C. 
McMahan, 
Republican 



2,404 
1,726 
1,940 
2,558 
2,019 

1,405 
2,337 
3,823 
2,421 
2,851 

766 
2,730 
2,201 
1,378 
2,287 

6,315 
2,208 
1,117 
5,167 
2,045 

925 
8,538 
1,877 
7,047 

3,490 
1,503 
2,300 
1,664 

4,955 
1,923 
2,336 
2,134 



296,387 



Peter G. 
Keely, 
Socialist 



11 
211 
16 
30 
21 

5 

208 
147 
300 

110 
18 
48 
14 

122 
27 
18 
31 



10,679 



32 



Year Book 



JUDGE APPELLATE COUKT, SECOND DISTRICT 



Counties 


Edwin F. 
McCabe, 
Democrat 


Alonzo L. 

Nichols, 

Republican 


Forest 
WaUace, 
Socialist 


Counties 


Edwin F. 
McCabe, 
Democrat 


Alonzo L. 

Nichols, 

Republican 


Forest 
Wallace, 
Socialist 


Adams 

Allen 


1,946 

8,557 
2,779 
1,004 
1,421 

3,032 
696 
1,888 
4,006 
3,171 

3,012 
3,191 
1,180 
2,529 
2,204 

1,882 
2,663 
4,442 
2,255 
4,112 

1,561 
3,178 
2,030 
1,812 
1,853 

3,051 
4,379 
3,417 
1,894 
2,347 

1,893 
1,941 
2,399 

2,205 
2,887 

2,390 
1,041 
2,638 
1,930 
1,324 

2,537 
4.138 
2,540 
1,005 
6,075 

3,660 
1,983 
5,769 
20.124 
2,612 


1,574 
9.124 
2,953 
1,639 
1,401 

3,074 
372 
2,240 
4.295 
2,638 

2,852 
3,465 
1,043 
3,169 
1,896 

2,482 
2.878 
6,159 
1.376 
5,366 

2,241 
2,946 
2,474 
1,270 
2,138 

3,342 
6,071 
3,791 
3.498 
2,057 

2.115 

2.853 
3.808 
3.882 
3,752 

2,361 
1,803 
2.858 
2.674 
1,674 

2,129 
4.416 
3,861 
1,916 
9,521 

4,593 
3.032 
6,467 
29.799 
2,751 


75 
787 

32 

10 
107 

39 
1 

16 
81 
41 

192 

35 

25 
118 

52 

33 

67 
111 

45 
461 

40 
70 
36 
15 
12 

118 
514 
483 

38 

22 

40 

26 

49 
365 
119 

41 
10 
56 
36 
31 

14 
309 _ 

56 

26 
374 

373 


Martin 

Miami 

Monroe 

Montgomery. . . 
Morgan 

Newton 

Noble 


1,237 
3,064 
2,126 
3,262 
2,218 

931 
2,363 

616 
1,562 
1,448 

1.762 
1,651 
1,727 
1,124 

2,198 
1,141 
2,601 
1,835 

2,036 

2,083 

879 

3,137 

1,788 
977 
999 

6,378 

2,994 
1,307 
3,228 
1,927 

708 
7,428 
1,813 
7.368 

2,258 

677 

2,024 

2,096 

3.266 
2.323 
1,748 
1.989 


1.327 
3.052 
2,508 
3,800 
2,615 

1,321 
3.044 
554 
2,108 
1,442 

2,407 
1,722 
1,939 
2.544 

2.012 
1,409 
2,334 
3.883 

2.419 

2,853 

765 

2.733 

2.198 
1.382 
2.269 
6,290 

2.204 
1,117 
5.166 
2.045 

921 
8.536 
1,876 
7.078 

3.487 
1,494 
2.298 
1,662 

4.968 
1.922 
2.336 
2.142 


11 
75 


Bartholomew... 

Benton 

BlacKford 


29 
45 
67 

7 


Brown 


50 


Carroll 


Ohio 


3 


Cass 


Orange 

Owen 


25 


Clark 


49 


Clay 


Parke 


68 




Perry 


16 


Crawford 


Pike 


166 


Daviess 


Porter 

Posey 

Pulaski 

I*utnam 

Randolph 

Ripiey 

Rush 




Dearborn 

Decatur 

Dekalb 

Delaware 

Dubois 

Elkhart 


25 
14 
45 
40 

73 
22 


Fayette 


Scott 


4 


Flovd 


Shelby 

Spencer 

Starke 

Steuben 

St. Joseph 

Sullivan 

Switzerland 

Tippecanoe.... 
Tipton 

Union 

Vanrierburgh. . . 

Vermillion 

Vigo 


34 


Fountain 

Franklin 

Fulton 

Gibson 

Grant 


79 
47 
10 

278 


Greene 

Hamilton 

Hancock 

Harrison 

Hendricks 

Heru-y 

Ho«vard 

Huntington. . . 


212 
15 
30 
21 

5 
208 
145 
297 


Jackson 

Jasper 

Jay 


Wabash 

Warren 

Warrick 

Washington.... 

Wayne 

WtfUs ,. 


111 
18 

48 


Jefferson 

Jennings 


13 

30 


Knox 


White 


18 


Kosciusko ... . 


Whitley 

Total 


31 


246.880 


296.271 


10,595 


Laporte 

Lawrence 




Madison 

Marion 

Mar^haU 


1,314 

1,017 

55 





Secretary of State 



38 



REPRESENTATrVES IN CONGRESS— 1918 



* . FIRST DISTRICT 

George K. ' Oscar R. 

Denton, Luhring, 

Counties — Dem. Rep. 

Gibson 3.250 3,384 

Kke 1,797 1,958 

Posey 2,336 2,065 

Spencer 1,922 2,253 

Vanderburgh 7,486 8,461 

Warrick 2,046 2,319 

Totals 18,837 20,440 

Luhring's plurality, 1,603. 

SECOND DISTRICT 

Fred F. Oscar E. 

Bays, Bland, 

Dem. Rep. 

Knox 3,862 5,078 

SulUvan 2,866 2,910 

Daviess 2,590 3,261 

Greene 3,256 4,391 

Owen 1,470 1,527 

Martin 1, 243 1, 395 

Morgan 2,276 2,732 

Monroe 2,168 2,649 

19,731 23,943 
Bland's plurality, 4,212. 

THIRD DISTRICT 

William E. James W. 

Cox, Dunbar, 

Dem. Rep. 

Lawrence 2, 107 3, 044 

Dubois 1,897 1,852 

Orange 1,650 2,119 

Crawford 1,226 1, 106 

Perry 1,695 1,783 

Washington 2, 162 1, 738 

Harrison 1, 954 2, 198 

Floyd 3,181 3,236 

Clark 3,207 2,704 

Scott 910 776 

19,989 20,556 
Dunbar's plurality, 567. 

FOURTH DISTRICT. 

Lincoln John S. 

Dixon, Benham, 

Dem. Rep. 

Jackson 2,481 2,398 

Brown 723 375 

Bartholomew 2,806 2,927 

Jennings 1,466 1,635 

Ripley 2,103 2,487 

Dearborn 2,308 1,938 

Ohio 636 532 

Switzerland 1,326 1,131 

Jefferson 2,058 2,676 

Johnson 2,559 2,119 

Decatur... 1,962 2,527 

20,428 20,745 
Benham's plurality, 317. 

FIFTH DISTRICT 

Ralph W. Everett 

Moss, Sanders, 

Dem. Rep. 

Clay 3,139 3,104 

Hendricks 2,003 2,929 

Parke 1,854 2,550 

Putnam 2, 610 2,462 

Vermillion 1,890 2,012 

Vigo 7.717 7,214 

19,213 20,271 
Sander's plurality, 1,058. 



ZimriW. 

Garten, 

Soc. 

261 

173 

90 

365 



AlvinL. 
Ogle, 
Soc. 
75 



302 



J. Harvey 
Caldwell, 
Socialist. 
152 
16 
52 
34 
142 
272 



668 



8—18966 



34 



Year Book 



REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS— Continued 



SIXTH DISTRICT 



Fayette. . 
Franklin. 
Hancock, 
Henry. .. 
Rush.... 
Shelby... 
Union. . . 
Wayne. . . 



Elliott's plurality, 3,511. 



Harry G. 


Richard N. 


John 


Strickland, 


Elliott, 


Nipp. 


Dem. 


Rep. 


Soc. 


1,636 


2,253 


25 


1,845 


1,332 


18 


2,370 


2,139 




2,426 


3,846 


44 


2,128 


2,921 




3,204 


2,774 


23 


714 


945 


4 


3,432 


6,056 
21,266 


92 


17,755 


206 



SEVENTH DISTRICT 



Chakner 



Marion 

. Moore's plurality, 9,430. 



Dem. 
20,284 



Merrill 
Moores, 

Rep. 
29,714 



Wm. H. 
Henry. 

1,010 



EIGHTH DISTRICT 



Wm.H. 

Eichorn, 
Dem. 

Madison 5,750 

Delaware 4,507 

Randolph 1,959 

Jay 2,750 

Wells 2,436 

Adams 2,019 



Vestal's plurality, 4,703. 



19,421 



Albert H. 


George S. 


Vestal, 


Martin, 


Rep. 


Soc. 


7,013 


1,267 


6,227 


124 


4,110 


34 


2,962 


34 


2,068 


26 


1,744 


63 



24,124 



,548 



NINTH DISTRICT 



Charles F. 

Howard, 

Dem. 

Fountain 1, 947 

Montgomery 3, 151 

Boone 2,983 

Clinton 3,111 

Carroll 1,822 

Tipton 1,890 

Howard 2,123 

Hamilton 1,921 



Fumell's plurality, 6.538. 



18.948 



Fred S. 


James 


JohnE 


PurneU, 


Horn. 


Brasheai 


Rep. 


Proh. 


Soc. 


2,560 


Ill 


36 


3,939 


40 


43 


3,116 


81 


49 


3,637 


72 


33 


2,342 


32 


16 


2,167 


26 


16 


4,130 


89 


356 


3,696 


117 


36 



TENTH DISTRICT 



George R. 

Kirschman, 

Dem. 

Benton 1,017 

Jasper 1,086 

Lake 6,254 

Newton 938 

Porter 1,137 

Tippecanoe 3, 193 

Warren 664 

White 1,775 



Wood'a plurality, 10,320. 



16,064 



Wm.R. 


Erwin S. 


Wood, 


Whitmer, 


Rep. 


Soc. 


1,710 


3 


1,850 


8 


9,531 


377 


1,324 




2,703 


53 


5,196 


29 


1,641 


16 


2,429 


18 


26,384 


504 



502671 



Secretary of State 



REPRESENTATIVES IN CONGRESS-Continued 

ELEVENTH DISTRICT 




35 





Geo. W. 


Milt W. 


George 




Eauch, 


Krauss, 


Lanning, 




Dem. 


Rep. 


Soc. 


BlacMord 


1,447 


1,482 


96 


Case 


4,121 


4,414 


73 


Grant 


4,750 


6,335 


478 


Huntington 


2,950 


3,885 


85 




3, 100 


3,215 
1,431 


66 


Pulaski 


1,132 


8 


Wabash 


2,349 


3,596 


99 




19,849 


24,358 


905 


Krauas' pluraUty, 4.509. 










TWELFTH DISTRICT 






Harry H. 


Louis W. 


Henry 




Hilgeman, 


Fairfield, 


Holman, 




Dem. 


Rep. 


Soc. 


Allen 


8,520 


9,209 


756 


Dekalb 


2,594 


3,164 


48 


te^".v.:::::;:;:::::::::::: 


1,045 


1,985 


13 


2,385 


3,196 


43 


Steuben 


955 


2,479 




Whitley 


2,039 


2,218 


24 



Fairfield's pluraUty, 4,713. 



17,538 



22,251 



884 



THIRTEENTH DISTRICT 





Henry A. 
Barnhart 


A. J. 


Warren 




Hickey, 


Evans, 




Dem. 


Rep. 


Soc. 


Elkhart 


4,485 


5,457 


417 


Fulton 


1,876 


2,130 


10 


Kosciusko 


2,668 


3,927 


. 31 


Laporte 


3,572 


5,120 


313 


MarahaU 


2,726 


2,822 


35 


Starke 


1,044 


1,394 


21 


St. Joseph 


6,903 


6,419 


269 



ffickey's plurality, 3,995. 



23,274 



27. 



SENATORS, SEVENTY-FIRST GENERAL ASSEMBLY— 1918 



Counties — 

Marion 

Masters' plurality, 9,821. 



Marion. 

(Short term.) 
Duffey's plurality, 9,842. 



Allen. 



Bowers' plurality, 141. 



Jay 

Randolph . 



Edward P. 

Barryj 

Dem. 

20,065 



Michael M. 

Mahoney, 

Dem. 

19,975 



Fred H. 

McCulloch, 

Dem. 

8.777 



Denton J. 

McFadden, 



2,712 
1,915 



Furnas' plurality. 2,246. 



4,627 



J.Fred 
Masters, 

Rep. 
29,886 



LukeW. 

Duffey, 

Rep. 

29,817 



William E. 

Bowers, 

Rep. 

8.918 



Miles J. 

Furnas, 
Rep. 
2,889 
3,984 



6,873 



William F. 
Jackman. 



1,012 



Edward 
Longresch. 



,021 



John S. 
Brunskill. 



771 



Year Book 



SENATORS, SEVENTY-FIRST GENERAL ASSEMBLY— Continued 



Counties— 

Whitley 

Huntington 


William 0. 
Taylor, 
Dem. 
1,994 
2,871 


Oliver 
KUne, 
Rep. 
2,196 
3,884 

6,080 


James D. 
Culp. 

■ ■ ■ 88 


Kline's plurality, 1,215. 


4,865 


88 


Pulaski 

White 

Carroll , 


Jacob C. 
McManus, 
Dem. 
1,142 
1,740 
1,892 


Curtis D. 

Meeker 
Rep. 
1,416 
2,388 
2,227 

6,031 




Meeker's plurality, 1,257. 


4,774 




Grant 

Hogston's plurality, 1,742. 


Thomas B. 
Dicken, 
Dem. 
4,474 


Alfred 

Hogston, 

Rep. 

6,216 


Samuel S. 
Condo. 

498 


Miami 

Howard 


Edward L. 

Willson, 

Dem. 

3,079 

2,349 


Donald P. 

Strode, 

Rep. 

3,074 

3,848 

6,922 


George W. 
KeUer. 

68 

356 


Strode's pluraHty,"l,564. 


5,428 


424 


dt. Joseph 

Hepler's plurality, 483. 


George Y. 
Helper, 
Dem. 
6,746 


Edgar S. 
Anderson, 

Rep. 

6,263 


Marshal A. 
McCoy. 

263 


Lake 

Porter 

Jasper 

Newton 


T.J. 

Sullivan, 

Dem. 

6,069 

996 
1,032 

928 


William 
Brown, 
Rep. 
9,588 
2,804 
1,808 
1,331 

15,531 


:v.'.'. ' '.:::'. 


Brown's plurality, 6,506. 


9,025 





Madison 

Tipton 

Henry 


Walter S. 

Chambers, 

Dem. 

. 5,829 

1,947 

2,590 

10,366 


Johns. 
Alldredge. 

',% 

2,069 
3,712 

12,504 




4Ildredge's pluraUty, 2,138. 





Wajme 


James A. 
Clifton, 
Dem. 
3,249 
1,604 

4,853 


Walter 

McConaha, 

Rep. 

5,024 

2,197 

7,221 


Fred 
Huckery. 

21 


Fayette 




McConaha's plurality, 2,368. 


21 


Bartholomew 

Shelby 


Maurice 

Douglas, 

Dem. 

2,813 

. 3,222 

6,035 


AraE. 
Fisher, 
Rep. 
2,921 
2,672 

5,593 




Douglas' pluraUty, 442. 






Secretary of State 



37 



SENATORS, SEVI 


ENTY-FIRST GEI 


^ERAL ASSEMBL 


-Y— Continued 




Counties— 

Benton 

Tippecanoe 


John T. 

Higgins 
Dem. 
1,009 
3,186 


RayM. 

Southworth, 

Rep. 

1,630 

5,190 






Southworth's plurality, 2,625. 


4,195 


6,820 






Montgomery 

Putnam 


Andrew E. 

Durham, 
Dem. 
3,286 
2,564 


Estes 
Duncan, 
Rep. 
3,806 
2,383 






Duncan's plurality, 339. 


5,850 


6,189 




Sullivan 

Greene 


James H. 

Humphreys, 

Dem. 

3,012 

3,466 


John E. 

Griffith, 
Rep. 
2,277 
3,802 

6,079 


--- 




Humphrey's plurality, 399. 


6,478 




Knox 

Pike 


D. Frank 

Culbertson, 

Dem. 

3,844 

1,741 


Charles A. 

Bainum, 
Rep. 
4,708 
1,935 

6,643 






V Bainum's plurality, 1,058. 


5,585 






Gibson 

Posey.. 


A. Clarence 

Thomas, 

Dem. 

3,091 

2,088 

5,179 


Paul 
Meier 
Rep. 
3,422 
2,170 

5,592 






Meier's plurality, 413. 






Vanderburgh 

Warrick..... 


Gaines H. 
Hazen, 
Dem. 
7,456 
2,037 

9,493 


Roscoe 
Kiper, 
Rep. 
8,504 
2,338 


Harry W. 
Carson. 

209 




Kiper's plurality, 1,349. 


10,842 


209 




Lawrence 

Martin 

Orange 


James E. 

Howland, 
Dem. 
1,989 
1,224 
1,575 

4,788 


Oscar E. 
Ratts, 
Rep. 
3.031 
1,341 
2,090 


Reed 
Gathers. 

78 
13 
13 








Ratts' plurality, 1,674. 


6,462 


104 




Spencer 

Dubois 

Daviess 


William A. 
McCullough, 
Dem. 
1,924 
2,279 
2,612 






.... 






McCullough's plurality, 6,815. 


6,815 






Perry 

Crawford 

Harrison 


Stewart A. 
Beals, 
Dem. 
1,620 
1,211 
1,799 


Frank H. 

Self, 

Rep. 
1,719 
1,061 
2,222 

5,002 






Self's plurality, 372. 


4,630 







38 



Year Book 



SENATORS, SEVENTY-FIRST GENERAL ASSEMBLY— Continued 



Counties— 




Michael F. 
Bohland, 

Dem. 

1,731 


Cecil C. 

Tague, 
Rep. 
1,339 
2,453 
1,660 
913 




Ripley 

Jennings 

Union 


plurahty, 503. 


2,071 

1,353 

707 

5,862 




Tague's 


6,365 




Dearborn . . . 

Ohio 

Switzerland . 
Jefferson. . . 


' plurality, 25. 


Joseph M. 
Cravens, 

Dem. 

2,181 
621 

1,321 

2,029 

6,152 


Erastus W. 
Caldwell, 
Rep. 
1,880 
519 
1,104 
2,624 




Cravens 


6,127 




Washington . 
Floyd 


3 plurality, 448. 


William A. 
Arnold, 
Dem. 
2,054 
3,122 


John W. 
Lewis, 
Rep. 
1,718 
3,010 




Arnold's 


5,176 


4,728 




Adams 




John F. 
Decker, 
Dem. 

2,046 


Benj. A. 
Van Winkle, 
Rep. 
1,569 
1,897 
1,421 




Wells 

Blackford.. 




2,431 
1,432 




Decker's 


3 plurahty, 1,022. 


5,909 


4,887 





REPRESENTATIVES SEVENTY-FIRST GENERAL ASSEMBLY— 1918 



Counties — 

Adams 

Walker's plurahty, 2,118. 


Joseph W. 

WalkerJ 

Dem. 

2,118 








Allen 

Vesey's plurality. 41. 


Henry J. 
Young 

Dem. 

8,829 


DickM. 
Vesey 

8,870 


AdlS?^ 
777 






Henry 
Cohen, 

Dem. 

8,523 


Dick 

Brandt, Jr., 

Rep. 

9,207 


Louis J H. 
Kruse. 

780 




Brandt's plurahty, 684. 








Peter A. 
Dietschel, 

Dem. 

8,519 


Chas. A. 
Phelps, 

Rep. 

9,130 


Otto 
Reuter. 

784 




Phelp's plurality, 611. 






Bartholomew 

Morgan's plurahty, 84. 


Charles A. 
Reeves, 
Dem. - 
2,821 


John W. 
Morgan, 

Rep. 

2,905 


..... 




Boone 

. Barker's plurality, 161. 


Benjamin F. 

McKey, 

Dem. 

2,975 


Murray S. 

Barker, 

Rep. 

3,136 


Thomas 
Burleson. 

42 





Secretary of State 



39 



REPRESENTATrVES SEVENTY-FIRST GENERAL ASSEMBLY— Continued 



Counties— 
Cass 

Beh^CT'spMitym 


George H. 
Schwalm, 

Dem. 

4,008 


Walter J. 
Behmer, 

Rep. 

4,402 




Clark 

Burtt's pluraUty, 311. 


Amos H. 
Burtt, 
Dem. 
3,037 


Abraham L. 
Crura, 
Rep. 
2,726 




Clay 

Griffith's plurality, 62. 


Richard H. 

Griffith, 

Dem. 

3,036 


Frank 

Wright, 

Rep. 

2,974 




Clinton 

Cann's plurality, 323. 


Wilbert E. 
Lowman 

Dem. 

3,172 


Howard A. 
Cann, 
Rep. 
3,495 





Dekalb 

Wilbs' pluraHty, 348. 


Cleve H. 
Grube, 
Dem. 
2,628 


Herbert C. 
WiUis, 
Rep. 
2,976 




Delaware 

McKinley's pluraHty, 1.844. 


Obed 

Kilgore, 

Dem. 

4,400 


Robert 

McKinley, 

Rep. 

6,244 


... .... 




J. Cooper 
ftops, 
Dem. 
4,593 


Jacob D. 

Miltenberger, 

Rep. 

6.162 




Miltenberger's pluraUty, 1,569. 




Elkhart 

Yoder's pluraUty, 1,029. 


Claude A. 
Lee. 
Dem. 
4,295 


Jonathan S. 
Yoder, 
Rep. 
5,324 


ReedS. 
Mallory. 

431 




Albert C. 
Tarman, 

Dem. 

4,095 


Lawrence 
Leer, 

5,515 


Albert E. 
Stump. 

431 


Leer's pluraUty, 1 420. 




Floyd 

Deem's pluraJity, 19. 


Jack H. 
Deem, 
Dem. 
3,146 


J. Irvin 

Streipey, 
Rep. 
3,127 




Gibson 

Smith's pluraUty. 351. 


Harvey 
Harmon 

Dem. 

3,095 


Claude A. 
Smith, 
Rep. 
3,446 




Grant 

BuUer's pluraUty, 1,924. 


John H. 
Clamme, 

Dem. 

4,385 


OUver 
Buller, 
Rep. 
6,209 


WUbur 
Sheron. 

497 




Wilson D. 
Lett, 
Dem. 
4,673 


Charles A. 

Johnson 

Rep. 

6,034 


Sylvester E. 
Wright. 

485 


Johnson's pluraUty, 1 361. 




Greene 

Baker's pluraUty, 490. 


Roscoe 
Carpenter, 

'.355 


WilUam H. 
Baker, 
Rep. 
3,845 


Hosea 
Fulkerson. 

416 



40 



Year Book 



REPRESENTATIVES SEVENTY-FIRST GENERAL ASSEMBLY— Continued 



Hugh A. 
Vaker, 
Counties — Dem. 

Hamilton 1,898 

Newby's plurality, 1,703. 

George H. 

Cooper, 

Dem. 

Hancock 2, 255 

Cooper's plurality, 19. 

Leora F. 
Hicks, 
Dem. 

Hendricks 1,881 

Mendenhall's plurality, 984. 

William L. 
Cory, 
Dem. 

Henry 2,403 

Symons' plurality, 1,457. 

Olen R. 
Holt 
Dem. 
Howard 2, 166 

Covalt's plurality, 1,833. 

Clarence F. 
Juillerat, 
Dem. 
Huntington 3,006 

Youse's plurality, 709. 

Henry D. 

Alldredge, 

Dem. 

Jackson 2, 315 

Butler's plurality, 97. 

John C. F. 

Graves 

Dem. 

Jay 2,788 

Davis' plurality, 39. 

Dr. James A. 
Craig, 
Dem. 

Johnson 2,541 

Craig's plurality, 419. 

Marshall T. 

Johnson, 

Dem. 

Knox 3,977 

Grayson's plurality, 593. 

Estil A. 
Gast, 
Dem. 

Kosciusko 2, 534 

Eschbach's plurality, 1,452. 

Thomas H. 

Cannon, 

Dem. 

Lake 6, 067 

Day's plurality, 3,412 

. KarlD. 
Norris, 
Dem. 

6,114 

Fifield's plurality, 3,415. 

Frank J. 

O'Rourke, 

Dem. 

5,957 

Harris' plurality, 3,627. 



Howard H 

Newby, 

Rep. 

",601 



Elwood 
Barnard, 

Rep. 

2,236 




Charles L. 

Mendenhall, 

Rep. 

2,865 




Luther F. 

Symons, 

Rep. 

3,860 




William B. 

Covalt. 

Rep. 

3,999 


Henry L. 
Weddell. 

362 


Ed.E. 

Youse, 

Rep. 

3,715 


Edgar 
SheU. 

96 


Frank B. 

Butler, 

Rep. 

2,412 


^ 


Chester A. 
Davis, 
Rep. 
2,827 




PaulD. 

Christian, 
Rep. 
2,122 




John M. 
Grayson 

Rep. 

4,570 


James A. 
Haton. 

263 


Jesse E. 

Eschbach. 

Rep. 

3,986 




James 0. 
Day, 
Rep. 
9,479 


Harry W. 
Pyle. 

352 


Otto G. 
Fifield, 

Rep. 

9,529 


Forrest R. 
Nicholas. 

350 


. J.Glenn, 

Harris, 

Rep. 

9,584 


George R. 
Watterson. 

356 



Secretary of State 



41 



\ 



REPRESENTATIVES SEVENTY-FIRST G 


lENERAL ASSEMl 


BLY-Contfnued 


Counties— 


John C. 
Wells, 
Dem. 
6,063 


Andrew H. 

Sambor, 

Rep. 

9,482 


Henry W. 
Frick. 

356 


Sambor's plurality, 3,419. 




Laporte 

Southard's plurality, 1,508. 


Allen G. W. 
Coan 
Dem. 
3,483 


James E. 

Southard, 

Rep, 

4,991 




Lawrence 

Malott's plurality, 1,176. 


Oscar W. 
Turner, 

Dem. 

1,928 


Noble 

Malott, 

Rep. 

3,104 


Chris. D. 
Donald. 

79 


Ma-lison 

Swain's plurality, 929. 


Edward 
Osborn, 

Dem. 

5,720 


William M. 
Swain, 
Rep. 
6,649 


William W. 
Farmer. 

1,300 




Calvin H. 
Fausset, 

Dem. 

5,741 


Rodney E. 
Williamson 

Rep. 

6,687 


John 
Armstrong. 

1,274 


Williamson's plurality, 946. 




Marion 

Abrams* plurality 9 748. 


William G. 
Beatty, 
Dem. 
. 20,101 


Henry 
Abrams. 

Rep 
29,849 


Henry 

Albertson, 
Soc. 
1,008 




Clifton R. 
Cameron 
Dem. 
. 20,099 


John L. 
Benedict 

Rep. 
29,860 


Jason H. 
Allen, 
Soc. 
1,002 ... 


Benedict's plurality, 9,761. 






Newton E. 
Elliott, 
Dem. 
. 19,902 


Charles J. 

Buchanan 

Rep. 

29,846 


WiUiam A 

Fox, 

Soc. 

10,017 


Buchanan's plurality, 9,944. 






John W. 
Friday, 
Dem. 
.. 20,117 


Clinton H. 

Givan 

Rep. 

29,737 


Frank 

Greeley, 

Soc. 

1,017 


Givan's plurality. 9,620. 




t 


Edward W. 
Hohit 
Dem. 
.. 20,101 


James L. 

Kingsbury 

Rep. 

29,861 


David W. 

HoweU 

Soc. 

1,015 


Kmgsbury's plurality, 9 760 






Joseph C. 
Manning, 
Dem. 
.. 20,075 


William S. 

McMasters, 

Rep. 

29,859 


George W. 

Larsair, 

Soc. 

1,013 


McMaster s plurality 9,784. 






Earle E. 
McFerren, 
Dem. 
.. 20,048 


Winfield 

Miller, 

Rep. 

29,888 


Carl J. 
Luca, 
Soc. 
1,015 


Miller's pluraUty, 9,840. 








Albert 
Stanley, 
Dem. 
, . . 20, 059 


Omer U. 
Newman, 

Rep. 
29,830 


Frank 
McCool, 
Soc. 
1,025 


Newman's plurality 9,771. 








Charles R. 
Stuart, 
Dem. 
... 20,085 


Prank J. 
Noll, Jr. 

Rep. 
29,827 


George 

Seel 

Soc. 
1.020 


Noll's plurality, 9 742. 







42 



Year Book 



REPRESENTATIVES SEVENTY-FIRST GENERAL ASSEM LY— Continued 



Frank 

Wilson 

Counties — Dem. 

20,145 

Traub's plurality, 9,655. 

Ealph R. 

Jacoby, 

Dem. 

Marshall 2,508 

Shilling's plurality, 431. 

Jacob A. 

Cunningham, 

Dem. 

Miami 3,018 

Kessler's plurality, 217. 

James H. 

Armantrout, 

Dem. 

Montgomery 3,410 

Lowe's plurality, 265. 

Curtis A. 

Teague 

Dem. 

Morgan 2,198 

Abraham's plurahty, 474. 

Peter 
Dolan, 
Dem. 

Noble 2,396 

Hoffman's plurality, 686. 

Roscoe U. 
Barker, 
Dem. 

Posey 2, 158 

Barker's plurahty 83. 

Thomas D 

Brookshire, 

Dem. 

Putnam 2, 439 

Wimmer's plurahty, 47. 

Enos 
LoUar, 
Dem. 

Randolph 1,927 

Wright's plurality, 2,051. 

Henry V. 
Logan, 
Dem. 

Rush 2,126 

Jinnett's plurality 730. 

Alfred C. 
Lee, 
Dem. 

Shelby 3,010 

Lee's plurality 103. 

Marion S. 
Gorski, 
Dem. 

St.Joseph 6,506 

Bainard's plurality, 142. 

Lrving M. 
Goss, 
Dem. 

• 6,425 

Byers' plurality 113. 

Louis 
Segety, 
Dem. 

6,493 

Hamilton's plurahty, 38. 



Homer L. 

Traub, 

Rep. 

29,800 



Schuyler C. 
ShiUing, 



Ira A. 

Kessler, 

Rep. 

3,235 



Richard 
Lowe, 
Rep. 
3,675 



Omer R, 

Abraham 

Rep. 

2,672 



John H. 

Hoffman, 

Rep. 



Carl A 

Weilbrenner, 

Rep. 

2,075 



Isaac L. 
Wimmer, 

Rep. 

2,486 



Frank E. 

Wright, 

Rep. 

3,978 



WiUiam R. 
Jinnett 
Rep. \ 

2,856 



Jeptha 

Humphries 

Rep. 

2,907 



Arthur W. 

Barnard, 

Rep. 

6,648 



Charles B. 
Byers, • 
Rep. 
6,538 



Francis W. 

Hamilton, 

Rep. 

6,531 



Fred 

Wulhehn, 

Soc. 

1.015 



Wilbur G. 
Houk. 



Mandel 
Gilman. 



265 



Anton 
Vaghy. 



William 
Armstead, 



253 



Secretary of State 



43 



REPRESENTATIVES SEVENTY-FIRST GENERAL ASSEMBLY— Continue J 



Counties- 
Sullivan 

Curry's plurality, 785. 


David N. 
Curry 
Dem. 
3,051 


Charles C. 

Stevens 

Rep. 

2,266 


Roscoe G. 
White. 

193 




Tippecanoe 

Kimmel's plurality, 1,885 


Stephen J. 

Beaver, 

Dem. 

3,251 


Frank 

Kimrael, 

Rep. 

5,136 






Vanderburgh 

Decker's plurality, 1 145. 


Eugene J. 
Eisterhold, 

Dem. 

7,405 


Adolph F. 

Decker, 

Rep. 

8,550 


Peter 
Aker. 

208 






FredC 

Richardt, 

Dem. 

7,4 7 


William J 

Muensterman 

Rep. 

8,531 


George G. 
Tilley. 

204 




Muensterman's plurality, 1,124. 




. 


Louis B, 
Waltz, 

Dem. 

7,407 


Harry E. 

Rowbottom, 

Rep. 

8,540 


Anson 

White. 

208 




Rowbottom's plurality, 1,133. 




Vermillion 

Scott's plurality, 43. 


Matthew W. 
Scott 
Dem. 
1,878 


JohnT. ' 
Lowe, 
Rep. 
1,835 


SheU 
Turbyville. 

138 




Vigo 

Bidaman's plurality, 315. \ 


Charles H. 
Bidaman, 

Dem. 

7,393 


ChauncyW. 

Flesher 

Rep. 

7,078 


Harry 
Lentz. 

281 






Patrick 
O'Leary, 

Dem. 

7,251 


WUliam T. 

Piety, 

Rep. 

7,229 


John 
Hessler. 

294 




O'Leary's plurality 22. 






John T. 
O'Neil, 

Dem. 

7,273 


Robert 
Sharpe, 

Rep. 

7,158 


Isaac E. 
Hall. 

283 




O'NeU's plurality 115. 




Wabash 

Winesburg's plurality, 1,211. 


Alexander 
Fulton. 
Dem. 
2,305 


John W. 

Winesburg, 

Rep. 

3,516 







Wayne 

Knapp's plurality, 1,546. 


Benjamin F. 

Wissler, 

Dem. 

3,323 


James M. 

Knapp, 

Rep. 

4,869 






Vanderburgh 

Warrick 


Edward P. 
Busse, 
Dem. 

7,478 
2,098 


Truman P. 

Tillman, 

Rep. 

8,478 
2,245 


Arthur 
Yaser. 

"269 





Tillman's plurality, 1,147. 


9,576 


10,723 


209 




Perry 

Spencer 


Wesley W. 

Kellams, 

Dem. 

1,593 

1,788 

3,381 


Thiebald T. 

Gaesser, 

Rep. 

1,743 

2.303 






Gaesser's pluraUty. 665. 


4,046 






44 



Year Book 



REPRESENTATIVES SEVENTY-FfRST GENERAL ASSEMBLY-Continuetf 




Counties — 

Knox 

Pike 


Mason J. 

Niblack, 
Dem. 
4,098 
1,720 

5,818 


WiUiam B. 
Anderson, 

Rep. 

4,428 

1,948 

6,376 




Anderson's plurality, 558. 




Daviess 

Martin 

Laugblin's plurality, 679. 


MoGuyer, 
Porter, 
Dem. 
2,559 
1,244 

3,803 


Edgar T. 
Laughlin, 

Rep. 

3.159 

1,323 

4,482 


:.::: 


Monroe 

Brown 


Joseph E. 

Henley, 

Dem. 

2,126 

837 

2,763 


David A. ^ 
Rothrock, 

Rep. 

2,533 

363 




Rotlirock's plurality, 133. 


2,896 





Dubois. 

Orange 


William 
Frick, 
Dem. 
2,294 
1,588 

3,882 


Edward L. 

Throop, 

Rep. 

1,303 

2,105 




Frick's plurality, 474. 


3,408 





Washington 

Crawford 


Sam 
Benz, 
Dem. 
1,976 
1,190 

3,166 


Lewis G. 

Carter, 

Rep. 

1,779 

1,082 




Benz's plurality, 305. 


2,861 




Floyd 

Harrison .• 


Charles W. 

Thomas, 

Dem. 

3, 149 

1,905 

5,054 


AbrahamgS. 

Sieg, 

Rep. 

2,937 

2,107 




Thomas' plurality, 10. 


5,044 





Scott. : 

Jefferson 

Deans plurality, 543. 


Samuel B 

WeUs. 

Dem. 

934 

1,950 

1,884 


Charles E. 
Dea,n, 

2,704 

3,437 ,.... 




Decatur 

Jennings 


J. Frank 
Hamilton, 

Dem. 

1,914 

1,324 

3,238 


William J. 

Hare, 

Rep. 

2,484 

1,702 




Hare's plurality, 948. 


4,186 


,..., 


Ripley 

Switzerland 


Harry C. 

Canteld, 
Dem. 
2,152 
1,310 


Darius G^ 

Gordon, 

t Rep.1 

2,369 

1, 109 






3,462 


3,47& 





Gordon's plurality, 1 



Secretary of State 



4U 





REPRESENTATIVES SEVENTY-FIRST GENERAL ASSEMBLY 


—Continued 


Counties— 
DHarborn . . 
Ohio 




J, I^onard 

Axby, 

Dem. 

2,212 

611 


Everett 

McClure, 

Rep. 

1,897 

533 




Axby's 


plurality, 393. 


2,823 


2,430 








Frank M. 
Edwards. 

Dem. 

1,778 


William R. 
PhUlipa, 

2,251 




Fayette. . . . 




1,555 




Phillip's 


} pluraUty, 202. 


3,333 


3,535 




Wayne 

bmon 


3 plurality, 1,888. 


Elmer E. 

Post, 

Dem. 

3,287 

699 


Oliver P. 

Lafuze, 

Rep. 

4,925 

949 


Fred 

Huckery. 

92 
2 


Lafaze'i 


3,985 


5.874 


9i 


Wells 




John W. 
Bcnham, 

Dem. 

2,372 


Thomas C. 
Peter.son, 

Rep. 

1,906 

1.460 




Blackford.. 




1,416 




Bonham's plurality, 422. 


3,788 


3,366 




Madiscn. . . 
Tipton 




Percy Hunter 

Doyle, 

\ Dem. 

5,908 

1.899 


Ray V. 

Gibbens, 
Rep. 
6,576 
2,114 




Gibben' 


s plurality, 8.S3. 


7,807 


8.690 





AUea 

Whitley.... 


' 


Omar Hugh 

Downey, 

Dem. 

8,681 
2,011 


EphP. 
Dailey, 

9?if3 
2,163 


Carl fi. 
Becker. 

782 


Dailey's 


i plurality, 684. 


10,592 


xl,276 


782 


Lagrange... 
Steuben.. . 


jhu^lity, 2,28U. 


FredK 
Powers, 

Dem. 

1,011 

967 


Raymond E. 
Willis, 
Rep. 
1,914 
2,344 

4,258 




Willis' I 


1.978 




Fulton 

Miami 


plurality, 524. 


Creorge W. 
Wolf, 
Dem. 
1,845 
3.001 

4,846 


Burton 
Green, 
Rep. 
2.149 
3.221 




Green's 


5,370 




Cass 

Carroll 




.\lbert A. 
Newer. 
Dem. 
4,026 
1,864 


James 
Delaplanc. 
Rep. 
4,371 
2,254 





Delaplanc's plurality. 735. 



5.890 



6.625 



46 



Year Book 



REPRESENTATIVES SEVENTY-FIRST GENERAL ASSEMBLY-Continued 





Edward 0. 


Harry B. 








Craft, 


Tutbill, 






Counties — 


Dem. 


Rep. 






Laporte 


3,594 


4,484 






Starlce 


992 


1,392 








4,586 


6,276 






Tuthill's plurality, 1,690. 


William F. 
Spooner, 


Jay J. 
Overmeyer, 






' 


Dem. 


Rep. 






Lake 


6,054 


9,563 






Porter 


1,127 
7,181 


2,552 
12,115 










Overmeyer's plurality, 4,934. 


WilUamN. 
Scott, 
Dem. 


George W. 

Hansen. 

Rep. 




. 


Pulaski 


1,124 


1,426 






miite 


1,808 


2,297 
3,723 









2,932 






HanseU's plurality, 791. 


Lawrence 
Burns, 
Dem. 


William L. 
Wood, 
Rep. 






Jasper 


1,040 


1,802 






Newton 


928 


1,326 






Benton 


986 


1,642 








2,954 


4,770 






Wood's plurality, 1,816. 


John C. 
White, 
Dem. 


Henry A. 
Miller, 
Rep. 






Tippecanoe 


3,219 


5,176 






Warren 


648 


1,535 








3,867 


6,711 






Miller's plurality, 2,844. 


James J. 
Williams, 


Howard L 
Demaree, 








Dem. 


Rep. 






Fountain 


2,038 


2,468 






Park 


1,809 


2,414 








3,847 


4,882 






Demaree's plurality, 1,035. 












George R. 


Oliver E. 


Rassie 






Griffin, 


Dunn. 


Cooper. 






Dem. 


Rep. 






Owen 


1,347 


1,552 


32 




Greene 


3,266 


3,889 


419 




Sullivan 


2,912 


2,298 


197 






7,525 


7,739 


648 





Dunn's plurality, 214. 



UDGES SUPERIOR COURT 





Carl 


WiUiam N. 


H.WiUard 




Yaple. 


Ballou, 


Smith, 


Counties — 


Dem. 


Rep. 




Allen 


8,778 


8,845 


778 


Ballou's plurality, 67. 










James L. 


William B. 


James 




Harman, 


Hile 


Van TUburg, 




Dem. 


Rep. 




Elkhart 


4,394 


5,274 


418 


Hile's plurality, 880. 









Secretary of State 



47 



JUDGES SUPERIOR COURT— Continued 

Frank Robert F. 

Feeley, Murray, 

Countiea — Dem. Rep. 

Grant 4,437 6,272 

Delaware 4,38S 6,313 

8,825 12,585 
Murray's plurality, 3,760. 

Virgil S. 
Reiter, 

Dem. Rep. 

Lake— Room 1 9,784 

Reider's plurality, 9,784. 

Fred Walter T. 

Barnett Hardy, 

Dem. Rep. 

Lake— Room 2 5,989 9,643 

Hardy's plurality 3 654. 

GraL. Charles E. " 

Wildermuth, Greenwald, 

Dem. Rep. 

Lake— Room 3 5,912 9,697 

Greenwald's plurality, 3 785. 

Woodburn William W. 

Masson, Thornton, 

Dem. Rep. 

Marion— Room 1 20,094 29,873 

Thornton's plurality, 9 779. 

Joseph Linn D. 

Collier, Hay 

Dem. Rep. 

Marion— Room 2... 20,076 29,863 

Hay's plurality, 9,787. 

\ John J. Ernest R. 

Rochford Keith, 

Dem. Rep. 

Marion— Room 3 20,087 29,911 

Keith's plurality 9,824. 

Clarence E. Vincent G. 

Weir, Clifford, 

Dem. Rep. 

Marion— Room 4 20,148 29,820 

Clifford's plurality, 9,672. 

Edgar A. Theophilus J. 

Brown, Moll, 

Dem. Rep. 

Marion— Room 5 20, 130 29,829 

Moll's plurality 9,699. 

Willis S. Lewis E. 

Ellis Kimberlin, 

Dem. Rep. 

Madison 6,261 6,200 

Ellis' plurality, 61. 

Wirt Harry L. 

Worden, Crumpacker, 

Dem. Rep. 

Laporte 3,596 4,951 

Porter 1,045 2,706 

4,641 7,657 
Crumpacker 's_plurality, 1,016. 

Chester R. Lenn J. 

Montgomery, Care, 

Dem. Rep. 

St. Joseph.... 6,958 6,234 

Montgomery's plurality, 724. 

Henry H. 
Vinton, 

Dem. Rep. 

Tippecanoe 5,200 

Fmton's plurality, 5,200. 



Thomas R. 
Johns, 



William 
Lundahl 



357 



Cecil 
Allen, 



340 



John 
Jacoby, 

1,012 



Leslie C. 
Dunham, 

1,015 



Sydnev 
Bramble 

1,005 



Morris 
Zimmerman, 

1,010 



Charles 
Green, 

1,004 



Louis Stewart 
Farmer, 



,261 



Francis Mi 
Waldon, 



267 



48 



Year Book 



JUDGES SUPERIOR COURT— Continued 



Counties— 

Vanderburgh 

TraceweU's plurality, 989. 


Fred M. Robert J. 

Hostetter, Tracewell* 

Dem. Rep. 

7,486 8,475 





Vigo 

Cox's plurality, 475. 


John E. William T. 
Cox, Gleason 
Dem. Rep. 
7,537 • 7,062 

JUDGE CRIMINAL COURT 


Edward H. 
Boston, 

275 


Marion 


Frank P. James A. 
Baker, Collins, 
Dem. Rep. 
... 19,752 30,012 


Edward 
Henry. 

1.024 


Collins* plurality, 10,260. 






JUDGE PROBATE COURT 




Marion 

Bash's plurality, 10,064. 


Fred Mahlon E. 
McCallister Bash, 
Dem. Rep. 
... 19,936 30,000 

JUDGE JUVENILE COURT 


William E. 
Keehn, 

1,011 


Marion 

Lahr's plurality, 10,078. 


Patrick J. Frank J. 
Kelleher, Lahr, 
Dem. Rep. 
... 19,912 29,990 


Louis 
Hornstein, 

1,016 



JUDGES OF THE CIRCUIT COURT— 1918 



Circuits — 
First— John W. 

Spencer, 
Dem. 

Vanderburgh 7,472 

Gould's plurality, 987. 

Sixth— Robert A. 

Creigmile, 
Dem. 

Ripley 2,203 

Jennings 1, 452 

Scott 919 

4,574 
Carney's plurality, 117. 

Eighth — Fremont 

MiUer, 
Dem. 

Brown 719 

Johnson 2, 530 

3,249 
Miller's plurality, 732. 

Twelfth— Williams. 

Hoover, 
Dem. 

Knox 4,152 

Coulter's plurality, 275. 

Thirteenth— Curtis G. 

ScofieldJ 
Dem. 

Clay 3,193 

Scofield's plurality, 241. 

Fourteenth — William H. 

Bridwell, 
Dem. 

Sullivan 3, 094 

Bridwell's plurality, 827. 



Philip C. 
Gould, 
Rep. 



John R. 
Carney, 
Rep. 
2,354 
1,615 
722 



Fred R. 

Owens, 

Rep. 

360 

2,157 

2,517 



Thomas B. 

Coulter 

Rep. 

4.427 



Thomas W. 
Hutchison, 

Rep. 

2,952 



Allison G. 

McNabb, 

Rep. 

2,267 



Secretary of State 



49 



JUDGES OF THE CIRCUIT C 


OURT-1918-Contlnued 




Circuits — 
Fifteenth- 
Morgan.. 

Bain's plurality, 550. 


Will H. 

Rgg. 

Dem. 

.... 2,184 


Ajtred W. 
Bain, 

2,734 






Eighteenth- 
Hancock 

Walker's plurality 227. 


Jonas P. 
Walker, 

Dem. 

2,366 


WUliam A. 

Hough, 

Rep. 

2, 139 






Twenty-First— 




Burton B. 
Berry 






Benton 

Warren 




Rep. 
1,754 
1,557 

3.311 






Berry's plurality 3 311. 






Twenty-Sixth— 

Adams 

Moran's plurality 616. 


JohnC. 
Moran 

Dem. 

2,216 


PaulG. 
Hooper 
Rep. 
1.600 






Twenty-Eighth— 

Blackford 

WeUs 


Augustus W. 

HamUton 

Dem. 

1,401 

2,110 

3,511 


Frank W. 

Gordon 

Rep. 

1,469 

2,285 

3,754 






Gordon's plurality 243. 






Twenty-Nmth— 

Cass 

Souder's plurality, 753. 


\ David D. 
Fickle, 
Dem. 
.... 3,844 


PaulM. 

Souder, 

Rep. 

4,597 






Thirty-Sixth— 

Tipton 

Purvis' pluraUty, 147. 


James M. 
Purvis, 
Dem. 
2,089 


Edward 
Daniels, 

Rep. 

1,942 






Thirty-Eighth— 

Allen 

Wood's pluraUty, 113. 


.John H. 
Aiken, 
Dem. 
8,732 


Sol A. 
Wood. 
Rep. 
8,845 


William S. 
Griffin. 

755 




Thirty-Ninth— 

Carroll •• 

White • 


George F. 

Marvin, 
Dem. 
1,887 
1,727 

3,614 


Benjamin F. 
Carr, 

2,237 
2,430 






Carr's pluraUty, 1,053. 


4,667 






Fortieth- 
Lawrence 

Jackson 


Albert J. 
Fields, 
Dem. 
1,997 
2,245 

4,242 


James A. 
Cox, 
Rep. 
3.066 
2.596 

5,662 






Cox's plurality, 1,420. 






ForV-Second— 
Orange 


Emmet C. 

Mitchell, 

Dem. 

1,578 


James L. 

Tucker, 
Rep. 
2,103 
1,764 






Washington 


2,073 
3,651 




Tucker's pluraUty, 216. 


3,867 






4—13956 











50 



Year Book 



JUDGES OF THE CIRCUIT 

Circuits— 
Fifty-Fifth— George W. 

BriU, 
Dem. 

Hendricks 2, 061 

Dougan's plurality, 729. 

Fifty-Sixth— William D. 

Hamer, 
Dem. 

Huntington 3,037 

Eberhart's plurality, 743. 

Sixtieth — Francis M. 

Jackson, 
Dem. 

St. Joseph 6,189 

Funk's plurality, 735. 

Sixty-First— Isaac E. 

Schoonover, 
Dem. 

Fountain 2, 082 

Ratcliff's plurality, 389. 

Sixty-Third — James M. 

Hudson, 
Dem. 

Greene •. 3,496 

Van Buskirk's plurality, 320. 

Sixty-Fourth— James P. 

Hughes, 
Dem. 

Putnam 2,675 

Hughes' plurality, 342. 



COURT— 1918— Continued 



Zimri E. 

Dougan, 

Rep. 

2,790 




George M. 
Eberhart, 

Rep. 

3,780 




Walter A. 
Funk, 
Rep. 
6,924 


Philip E. 
Tomlinson. 

268 


Omer B. 
Ratcliff, 

Rep. 

2,471 




Thomas 

Van Buskirk, 

Rep. 

3,816 


Frank 
Miller, 

403 


Charles T. 
Peck, 
Rep. 
2,333 





PROSECUTING ATTORNEY— 1918 



Mouser's plurality, 351. 



3,36C 



3,711 



Circuit- 
First— 

Vanderburgh 

Heilman's plurality, 1,000. 


ValF. 
Nolan, 
Dem. 
7,473 


George D. 

Heilman, 

Rep. 

8,473 




Second- 
Spencer 

Warrick 


James L. 

Houston, 
Dem. 
1,835 
2,033 

3,868 


Robert L. 

Lawburgh 
Rep. 
2,237 
2,312 




Lawburgh's plurality, 681. 


4,549 




Third- 
Crawford 

Harrison 

Perry 


Charles T. 
Brown, 
Dem. 
1,164 
1,839 
1,577 


Edmund S. 
Lincoln, 
Rep. 
1,107 
2, 162 
1,795 




Lincoln's plurality, 484. 


4,580 


5,064 




Fourth- 
Clarke 

McBride's plurality, 693. 


Claude B. 
McBride, 

Dem. 

3,248 


Henry F. 
Dilger, 
Rep. 
2,555 




Fifth- 
Jefferson 

Switzerland 


Harvey J. 

Zearing, 

Dem. 

2.040 

1,320 


Byron F. 
Mouser, 
(Rep. 
2,608 
1,103 









Secretary of State 



51 



PROSECUTING ATTORNEY 


-1918-ContInue( 


i 


Circuit— 
Sixth- 

Ripley 

Jennings 

Scott 


George V. 
Cain, 
Dem. 
2,068 
1,356 
897 


Charles S. 
Royce, 

2,458 

1,666 

744 




Royce's plurality, 547. 


4,321 


4,868 




Seventh- 
Dearborn 

Ohio 


Willard M. 

Dean, 

Dem. 

639 

2,249 


B«p. 




Dean's plurality, 2.888. 


2,888 






Eighth- 
Brown 

Johnson 


George B. 

Staff, 

Dem. 

695 

2,574 

3,269 


Rep. 




Staff's plurality, 3,269. 







Nmth- 

Bartholomew 

Decatur 


Harry M. 
Settle, 
Dem. 
2,811 
1,956 


CarlJ. 
Carter, 

2,909 
2,446 

5.355 




Carter's pluraUty, 588. 


^ 4,767 




Tenth- 
Monroe 

Owen 


RoyD. 

Buckley, 
Dem. 
2,084 
1,465 


Q. Austin 
East. 
Rep. 
2,578 
1,429 

4,007 




East's plurality, 458. 


3,549 




Eleventh— 

Posey 

Wade's plurality, 2,289. 


Jesse E. 
Wade. 
Dem. 
2,289 


Rep. 




Twelfth- 

Knox 

Barr's plurality, 306. 


William F. 
Calverley, 

Dem. 

4,141 


Hugh L. 
Barr, 
Rep. 
4,447 




Thirteenth- 
Clay 

Fisher's plurality. 213. 


Harvey L. 
Fisher, 
Dem. 
.... 3.132 


Charles H. 

Nussel. 

Rep. 

2.919 




Fourteenth- 
Sullivan 

Taylor's plurality. 600. 


Johns. 

Taylor, 

Dem. 

.... 2.963 


Arthur D. 
Cutler, 

2,363 




Fifteenth- 
Morgan 

Smith's plurality, 496. 


James P. 
Griggs, 
Dem. 
2,192 


OrlaW. 
Smith, 

Rfip. 

2,688 


'.. . 


Sixteenth- 
Shelby 

Tolen's plurality, 297. 


Dem. 
3.108 


Chester 
Wheeler, 

Rep. 

2,811 





52 


Year 


Book 






PROSECUTING ATTORNEY-1918-Continued 






Circuit — 
Seventeenth- 
Wayne 

Freeman's plurality, 5,075. 


Dem. 


Gath P. 
Freeman, 

Rep. 

5,075 






Eighteenth — 

Hancock , 

Binford's plurality 137. 


Paul F. 
Binford, 

Dem. 

2,307 


George T. 

Tindall, 

Rep. 

2,170 






Nineteenth- 
Marion 

Adams' plurality, 9.923. 


Thomas D. 
McGee, 
Dem. 
... 20,008 


Claris 

Adams, 

Rep. 

29,931 


Thos. T. 
Marshall, 

1,010 




Twentieth— 

Boone 

Darnell's plurality, 1. 


Henry L. 
Moore, 
Dem. 
3,051 


William J. 

Darnell, 

Rep. 

3,052 


Edward W. 
Ellis. 

87 




Twenty-First— 

Benton 

Warren 


Dem. 


WUbur G. 
Nolin 
Rep. 
1,748 
1,549 






. Nolin's plurality, 3,297 





3,297 






Twenty-Second— 

Montgomery 

Caldwell's plurality, 481. 


Matthew S. 
Simms, 
Dem. 
3,290 


Robert W. 
CaldweU 

3,7li 






Twenty-Third— 
Tippecanoe 


Rochester 
Baird, 
Dem. 
3,295 


Morris R. 
Parks, 
Rep. 
5.092 






Parks' plurality, 1,797. 






Twenty-Fourth— 




Ralph H. 

Waltz, 

Rep. 

3,629 






Hamilton 

Waltz's plurality, 3,629. 


Dem. 






Twenty-Fifth— 

Randolph 

Dunn's plurality, 2,198. 


Benjamin J. 

Brown, 

Dem. 

1,852 


Ernest M. 
Dunn, ~ 
Rep. 
4,0.50 






Twenty-Sixth- 


E. Burt 
Lenhart, 

Dem. 

2,148 








Lenhart's plurality, 2,148. 






Twenty-Seventh— 


Ruskin B. 

Phillips, 

Dem. 

2,431 


Quincy E. 

Milliner, 

Rep. 

3,399 


William J. 
Baumgarten. 




Wabaflh 

MiUiner's plurality, 968. 


96 




Twenty-Eighth— 

Wells 

Blackford 


OrviUeA. 

Pursley, 

Dem. 

2,297 

1,436 

3,733 


JohnL. 

Hobson, 
Rep. 
2,009 
1,542 

3,551 


Joseph E. 
Busby, 

86 
86 




Puraley's plurality, 182. 





Secretary of State 



53 



PROSECUTING ATTORNEY 


—1918— Continued 






Circuit— 
Twenty-Ninth— 

Cass 

Smith's plurality, 601. 


Thomas C, 

Bradficld, 

Dem. 

3,844 


John B, 
Smith, 
Rep. 
4,445 






Thirtieth- 
Jasper 

Newton 


C. Arthur 

Tuteur, 

Dem. 

1,044 

921 


James C. 

Murphy, 
Rep. 
1,797 
1.339 






Murphy's plurality, 1,171. 


1,965 


3,136 






Thirty-First — 

Lake 

Hunter's plurality. 9,477. 


Dem. 


Clyde 
Hunter, 

Rep. 

9,844 


Dimitri 
Economroff. 

367 




Thirty-Second— 

Laporte 

Rawley's plurality, 387. 


Louis E. 
Kunkel, 

Dem. 

4,074 


Earl 

Rawley, 

Rep. 

4,461 






Thirty-Third— 

Noble 

Whiting 


W. Mortimer, 

Cole. 

Dem. 

..X 2,369 

2.001 


Clarence R. 

Finley, 

Rep. 

3,098 

2,170 






Finley's plurality, 898. 


4,370 


5,268 - 







Thirty-Fourth— 

Elkhart 

Lagrange 


Emil 
Franz, 
Dem. 
4,247 
1,000 


Herman 

Haskins, 

Rep. 

5,374 

1,961 

7,335 












Raskin's plurality, 2,088. 


5,247 . 






Thirty-Fifth- 

Dekalb 

Steuben 


Oak 

Husselman, 
Dem. 
2.956 
1,076 


Thomas P. 

French, 

Rep. 

2,698 

2,223 






French's plurality, 889 


4,032 


4.921 






Thirty-Sixth— 
Tipton 


Frank B. 
Russell, 

Dem. 

1,987 


RexE. 

Ballenger, 

Rep. 

2.043 






Ballenger's plurality, 56. 






Thirty-Seventh— 

Fayette 

Franklin 

Union 


George W. 
Goble. 
Dem. 
1,528 
1,773 
714 


E. Ralph 
Himelick, 

Rep. 

2,277 

1,297 
916 






Himelick's pluraHty, 475. 


4,015 


4,490 






Thirty-Eighth- 
Allen 

Todd's plurality, 105. 


Frank A. 
Emrick. 

Dem. 

8,805 


Levi A. 
Todd, 
Rep. 
8,910 


Walter 
Eickmyer. 

751 





54 



Year Book 



Circuit — 
Thirty-Ninth— 



CarroU. 
White., 



PROSECUTING ATTORNEY— 1918-Continued 



Ireland's plurality, 884 



Harvey 

Studebaker, 

Dem. 

1,874 

1,805 



3,679 



Claudius E. 

Ireland, 

Rep. 

2,246 

2,317 



4,563 



Fortieth — Joseph 

Giles, 
Dem. 

Lawrence 1,978 

Jackson 2,278 

4,256 
Lowe's plurality, 1,097. 

Forty First— Rudolph V. 

Shakes, 
Dem. 

Fulton 1,855 

Marshall 2,708 

4,563 
Brown's plurality, 342. 

Forty-Second — Thomas P. 

Masterson, 
Dem. 

Orange 1,581 

Washington 2,101 

3,682 
McMahan's plurahty, 51. 

Forty-Third— Perry 

Douglas, 
Dem. 

Vigo 7,524 

Douglas' plurality, 428. 

Forty-Fourth- George L. 

Burson, 
Dem. 

Pulaski 1,103 

Starke 951 

2,054 
Dilt's plurality, 843. 

Forty-Fifth— John L. 

Downing, 
Dem. 

CUnton 3,247 

Devol's plurality, 169. 

Forty-Sixth— J. Frank 

Mann, 
Dem. 

Delaware 4,527 

Murphy's plurality, 1,294. 

Forty-Seventh— Ernest M, 

Causey, 
Dem. 

Vermillion 1,855 

Davisson's plurality, 45. 

Forty-Eighth— Thomas E. 

Pickerill, 
Dem. 

Gtant 5,066 

Coon's plurality, 684. 



Simpson B. 
Lowe, 
Rep. 
3,066 
2,287 

5,353 



1,900 



George M. 
Coon, 
Rep. 
5,750 



Selden J. 

Brown, 

Rep. 

2,142 

2,763 






4,905 







George W. 
McMahan, 

Rep. 

2,072 

i;661 






3,733 






William E. 

Horsley, 

Rep. 

7,096 


Edward S. 
Scanlon. 

286 


' 


James A. 
Dilts' 
Rep. 
1,464 
1,433 






2,897 






Brenton A. 
Devol, 
Rep. 
3,416 






Horace G. 
Murphy, 

Rep. 

5,821 


Frances A. 
Shaw. 

288 




Everett A. 
Davisson, 


Joseph 
Wright. 





127 



Harry K. 
Otis. 



Secretary of State 

PROSECUTING ATTORNEY— 1918— Continued 

Circuit — 

Forty-Ninth— - Arthur H. J. Earle 

Greenwood, Thompson, 

Dem. Rep. 

Daviess 2,585 3,179 

Martin 1,209 1,358 

3,794 4,537 
Thompson's plurality, 743. 

Fiftieth— Frank Samuel 

Matthews, Johnson, 

Dem. Rep. 

Madison 5,727 6,746 

Johnson's plurality 1,019. 

Fifty-First— Leroy 0. Russel J. 

Arnold, Wildman, 

Dem. Rep. 

Miami 3,146 3,071 

Arnold's plurality, 75.* 

Fifty-Second— Charles R. D. Kirke 

Turner, Hedden, 

Dem. Rep. 

Floyd 3,289 2,983 

Turner's plurality, 306. 

Fifty-Third— Clarence M. 

Brown, 

Dem. Rep. 

Henry 3,852 

Brown's plurality, 3,852. ^ 

Fifty-Fourth— Henry W. 

Graham, 

Dem. Rep. 

Kosciusko 4,015 

Graham's plurality, 4,015. 

Fifty-Fifth— John R. Ernest 

Sheehan, Owens, 

Dem. Rep. 

Hendricks 1,942 2,862 

Owens' plurality, 920. 

Fifty-Sixth— Wilbur E. Arthur H. 

Branyan, Sapp, 

Dem. Rep. 

Huntmgton 3,048 3,758 

Sapp's plurality, 710. 

Fifty-Seventh— Stanley M. Arthur H. 

Krieg, Wolven, 

Dem. Rep. 

Dubois 2,288 1,315 

Kke 1,711 1,954 

3,999 3,269 
Krieg's plurality, 730. 

Fifty-Eighth— Charles H. John T. 

Shockney, Sutton, 

Dem. Rep. 

Jay 2,774 2,841 

Sutton's pluraUty, 67. 

Sixtieth — ^ Samuel P. Cyrus E. 

Schwartz, Pattee, 

Dem. Rep. 

St.Joseph 6,709 6,525 

Schwartz's plurality, 184. 

Sixty-First— James E. John P. 

Rodenbeck, Brissey, 

Dem. Rep. 

Fountain 2,086 2,435 

Brissey's plurality, 349. 



55 



Joseph 
Carney, 

1,261 



Biro. 



56 


Year Book 






PROSECUTING ATTORNEY 


-1918-Contlnued 






Circuit— 
Sixty-Second— 

Howard 

Burk'a plurality, 1,076. 


John 

Marshall, 

Dem. 

2,563 


D. Lawrence 
Burk, 
Rep. 
3,639 


Charlton 
Bull. 

362 




Sixty-Third— 

Greene 

Vosloh'splurality, 537. 


Henry 

Bordenet, 

Dem. 

3,332 


Will R. 
Vosloh, 
Rep. 
3,869 


Ellis T. 
Veller. 

417 




Sixty-Fourth— 

Putnam .^ 

Hamilton's plurality, 145. 


FayS. 

Hamilton, 

Dem. 

2,547 


Jesse 
McAnally, 

2,402 






Sixty-Fifth— 

Rush 

Steven's plurality, 565. 


Gates 

Ketchum, 

Dem. 

2,209 


Albert C. 

Stevens, 

Rep. 

2,774 




..... 


Sixty-Sixth— 

Gibson 

Clark's plurality, 261. 


Thomas W. 
Cullen. 
Dem. 
3,138 


Robert H. 
Clark, 
Rep. 
3,399 






Sixty-Seventh— 




Charles W. 
Jensen, 
Rep. 
2,688 • 






Porter 

Jensen's plurality, 2,688. 


Dem. 




.... 


Sixty-Eighth— 

Parke 

Dowd's plurality, 570. 


Roy 
Baker, 
Dem. 
1,836 


Earl M. 
Dowd, 
Rep. 
2,403 




« 



REPORT OF TH^ AUDITOR OF STATE 



OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENTAL HEADS 

OTTO L. KLAUSS, Auditor. 
JOHN E. REED, Deputy Auditor. 
J. D. WILLIAMS, Audit Clerk. 
L. C. JOHNSON, Settlement Clerk. 
C. W. CAMP, Clerk of Bank Department. 
. STUART A. COULTER, Insurance Deputy. 
J. H. TOMLIN, Clerk Building and Loan Department. 
H. W. KRAEMER, Clerk Land Department. 

DUTIES OF THE AUDITOR OF STATE 

The Auditor of Indiana is, in addition to being Auditor of State, ex 
officio State Tax Commi^ioner ; ex officio Land Commissioner; ex officio 
Building and Loan Commission; ex officio Bank Commission, and ex 
officio Insurance Commissioner. He is a member of the State Board of 
Finance, a member of the State Board of Accounts, a member of the 
State Teachers' Retirement Fund Board, a member of the Board of 
Public Buildings and Grounds, a member of the Bureau of Public Print- 
ing, and also a member of the Board of Appointment, which board ap- 
points the members of the State Board of Health. 

The Auditor of State is required to keep and state all accounts be- 
tween the State of Indiana and the United States, or any State or Terri- 
tory, or any individual or public officer of this State indebted to the 
State or intrusted with the collection, disbursement or management of 
any moneys, funds or interest arising therefrom, belonging to the State, 
of every character and description whatsoever, when the same are de- 
rivable from or payable into the State Treasury. 

Examine and liquidate the accounts of all county treasurers and other 
collectors and receivers of all state revenues, taxes, tolls and incomes, 
levied or collected by any act of the General Assembly, and payable into 
the State Treasury, and certify the amount or balance to the Treasury 
of State. 

Keep fair, clear, distinct and separate accounts of all the revenues 
and incomes of the State; and also of all expenditures, disbursements 
and investments thereof, showing the particulars of every expenditure, 
disbursement and investment. 

Examine, adjust and settle the accounts of all public debtors, for 
debts due the State Treasury, and require all such persons, or their legal 
representatives, who may be indebted to the State for moneys received 
or otherwise, and who shall not have accounted therefor, to settle their 
accounts. 

Examine and liquidate the claims of all persons against the State, in 
cases where provisions for the payment thereof shall have been made by 

(57) 



58 Year Book 

law; and when no such provisions, or an insufficient one, has been made, 
to examine the claim, and report the facts, with his opinion thereon, to 
the Legislature; and no allowance shall be made to refund moneys from 
the treasury without his statement either for or against the justice of 
the claim. 

Institute and prosecute, in the name of the State, all proper suits for 
the recovery of any debts, moneys or property of the State, or for the 
ascertainment of any right of liability concerning the same. 

Direct and superintend the collection of all moneys due to the State, 
and employ counsel to prosecute suits, instituted at his instance, on be- 
half of the State. 

Draw warrants on the treasurer for all moneys directed by law to be 
paid out of the treasury to public officers, or for any other object what- 
soever, as the same may become payable, and every warrant shall be 
properly numbered. 

Furnish to the Governor, on his requisition, information in writing 
upon any subject relating to the duties of the office of Auditor. 

Superintend the fiscal concerns of the State and their management 
in the manner required by law, and furnish the proper forms to as- 
sessors, treasurers, collectors and auditors of counties. 

Keep and preserve all public books, records, papers, documents, 
vouchers, and all conveyances, leases, mortgages, bonds, and all secur- 
ities for debts, moneys or property, and accounts and property, of any 
description, belonging or appertaining to his office and also to the State, 
where no other provision is made by law for the safe-keeping of the 
same. 

Suggest plans for the improvement and management of the public 
revenues, funds and incomes. 

Report and exhibit to the General Assembly, at its biennial meeting, 
a complete statement of the revenues, taxables, funds, resources, incomes 
and property of the State, known to his office, and of the public revenues 
and expenditures of the two preceding fiscal years, with a detailed esti- 
mate of the expenditures to be defrayed from the treasury for the en- 
suing two years, specifying therein each object of expenditure, and dis- 
tinguishing between each object of expenditure and between such as are 
provided for by permanent or temporary appropriations, and such as 
require to be provided for by law, and showing also the sources and 
means from which all such expenditures are to be defrayed. 



AUDITING DEPARTMENT 

STATEMENT OF BALANCES, RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 

A detailed statement of the work of the auditing department of the 
office of the Auditor of State for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
1918, giving a condensed exhibit of the balance in the State Treasury 
by funds at the beginning of the fiscal year, October 1, 1917, also the 
amounts received and disbursed from the several funds during the year 
and the balance on hand at the close of business September 30, 1918. 



Auditor op Sta-te 59 

Balances by Funds October 1, 1917 

General Fund $1,736,193 32 

Educational Institution Fund 268,186 56 

Vocational Education Fund 373,130 26 

State Debt Sinking Fund ; 486,877 60 

School Revenue for Tuition 93,438 25 

College Fund Principal 3,835 00 

Permanent Endowment Fund Principal 3,023 56 

Road Fund 67,143 40 

Fire Marshal Fund 25,874 97 

Hydrophobia Fund 3,549 67 

Unclaimed Estates 44,128 97 

Swamp Land 945 80 

Highway Fund 306,790 07 

Total , $8,413,117 43 

Receipts by Funds Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 1918 

General Fund $6,902,290 35 

Benevolent Institution 2,096,653 22 

Educational Institution Fund. .^ 1,468,866 95 

Vocational Education Fund 200.235 42 

State Debt Sinking Fund 148,391 19 

Common School Fund Principal. . , 3,436 65 

School Revenue for Tuition 3,628,296 92 

College Fund Principal 332 55 

College Fund Interest 150 89 

Permanent Endowment Fund Principal 970 00 

Permanent Endowment Fund Interest 45,360 34 

Road Fund 1,314,541 94 

Fire Marshal Fund 46,829 80 

Hydrophobia Fund 5,626 28 

Unclaimed Estates 3,857 03 

Highway Fund 535,676 03 

Total $16,401,015 56 

Disbursements by Funds Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 1918 

General Fund $6,874,117 37 

Benevolent Institutions 2,096,653 22 

Educational Institution Fund 1,600,123 70 

Vocational Education Fund 181,712 55 

State Debt Sinking Fund 295,268 79 

Common School Fund Principal 195 00 

School Revenue for Tuition 3,627,898 19 

College Fund Interest 150 89 

Permanent Endowment Fund Interest 45,360 34 

Road Fund .' . 1,324.033 79 

Fire Marshal Fund , 34,997 68 

Hydrophobia Fund 6,423 94 

Unclaimed Estates 162 50 

Highway Fund 26,873 67 

Total $16,118,971 63 



60 



Year Book 



STATEMENT OF TRANSFER WARRANTS AND ADVANCEMENTS, SHOWING NET 
RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS OF ALL FUNDS 

General Fund 

Disbursements Receipts 

Purdue University U. S. Appropriation $50,000 00 $50,000 00 

Board of State Charities Transportation, account reimbursed 500 00 500 00 

Transfer Warrants, "Governor's Emergency Fund" to other 

accounts 1,850 00 1,850 00 

Transfer Warrant "Governor's Civil and Military Con- 
tingent Fund" to Maintenance account Northern Hos- 
pital Insane 6,419 45 6,419 45 

Transfer Warrants "Governor's Special Contingent Fund" 

to Maintenance Accounts of State's Institutions 207,038 70 207,038 70 

Transfer Warrants "Emergency and Contingent Fund, Spe- 
cific" to various accounts of State's Institutions 62,177 92 62,177 92 

Transfer Warrant from Benevolent Institution Fund 2,096,645 54 

Transfer Warrant from State Debt Sinking Fund 295,267 64 

Total $327,986 07 $2,719,899 25 

Summary General Fund 

Disbursements Receipts 

Gross Disbursements and Receipts. $6,874,117 37 $6,902,290 35 

Less Transfer Warrants and Advancements 327,986 07 2,719,899 25 

Net Disbursements and Receipts $6,546,131 30 $4,182,391 10 

Benevolent Institution Fund 
Transfer Warrant to General Fund $2,096,645 54 

State Debt Sinking Fund 
Transfer Warrant to General Fund $295,267 64 

Common School Fund Principal 

Transfer Warrant to Permanent Endowment Fund Principal 195 00 

Transfer Warrant from Hydrophobia Fund 549 67 

Hydrophobia Fund 
Transfer Warrant to Common School Fund Principal 549 67 

Permanent Endowment Fund Principal 
Transfer Warrant from Common School Fund Principal.... 195^00 

Totals, Transfers and Advancement, all Funds $2,720,643 92 $2,720,643 92 

Summary 

Balance on hand October 1, 1917 $3,413,117 43 

Gross Receipts $16,401,015 56 

Less Transfers and Advancements 2,720,643 92 

Net Receipts $13,680,371 64 

$17,093,489 07 

Gross Disbursements $16,113,971 63 

Less Transfers and Advancements 2,720,643 92 

Net Disbursements $13,393,327 71 

Balance on hand September 30, 1918 $3,700,161 36 



Auditor of State 61 

Balances by Funds September 30, 1918 

General Fund $1,764,366 30 

Educational Institution Fund 136,429 81 

Vocational Education Fund 391,653 13 

State Debt Sinking Fund 340,000 00 

Common School Fund Principal 4,187 45 

School Revenue for Tuition 93,836 98 

College Fund Principal 4,167 55 

Permanent Endowment Fund Principal 3,993 56 

Road Fund 57,651 55 

Fire Marshal Fund 37,707 09 

Hydrophobia Fund 2,752 01 

Unclaimed Estates 47,823 50 

Highway Fund 815,592 43 



Totals $3,700,161 86 

GENERAL FUND DISBURSEMENTS AND RECEIPTS 

Governor — Disbursements Receipts 

Salary $8,000 00 

Private Secretary 2,500 00 

Executive Clerk 1,200 00 

Stenographer .\ 885 00 

Office Expense 993 58 

Civil and Military Contingent 9.999 42 

Emergency , 30.002 14 $4 20 

Rent. Light and Heat 1.800 00 

Ventilation and Alteration 125,996 29 273 17 

Year Book 19,849 82 

Special Contingent 207,038 70 

Committee on Mental Defectives 6,475 52 

Lieutenant Governor's Salary 1,000 00 83 33 



^,. ^ ^^ , $415,740 47 $360 70 
Adjutant-General — 

Salary $3,000 00 

Chief Clerk '. 1,173 33 

Stenographer 900 00 

Additional Stenographer 720 00 

Card Index 1,662 53 

Spanish War Claims 15 74 

Mobilization National Guards 35 42 

Warehouse 7,000 00 

Quartermaster-General Clerk 1,170 00 

Quartermaster-General Stenographer 900 00 

Indiana MiUtia / 195,912 95 26,987 09 



„ , ^ „, , $212,489 97 $26,987 09 
Secretary of State — 

Salary $6,500 00 

Deputy 2,400 00 

Assistant Deputy 1,800 00 

Clerk and Stenographer 1.020 00 

Office Expense 144 47 

Distribution Public Documents 250 00 

Distribution Court Reports 87 00 

Foreign Corporations and Special Recording 242 50 

Domestic Corporation Fees $134,619 70 

Foreign Corporation Fees 24,150 11 

Sale of Court Reports 2,907 00 

Miscellaneous Fees 21.028 25 



$12,443 97 $182,700 06 



62 Year Book 

Bureau Public Printing and Stationery — Disbursements Receipts 

Printing, Advertising and Stationery $32,477 56 

Clerk 2,500 00 

Assistant Clerk ., 1,500 00 

Office Expense :;/..;* 207 99 

Supreme and Appellate Court Reports 4,178 52 



$11,598 79 
Attorney General — 

Salary $7,500 00 

Assistant 3,600 00 

Deputy 2,600 00 

Second deputy 2,100 00 

Traveling deputy 1,600 00 

Stenographer and clerk 1,080 00 

Additional stenographer 867 50 

Traveling expenses 382 07 



$40,864 07 

Auditor of State — 

Salary $7,500 00 

Deputy 3,500 00 

Audit Clerk 2,500 00 

Settlement Clerk 2,200 00 

Audit Stenographer 920 00 

Insurance Deputy 2.983 33 

Insurance Clerk 1.800 00 

Insurance Clerk Extra 1.000 00 

Securities Clerk 2,500 00 

Assistant Securities Clerk 900 00' • 

Insurance Actuary 4,000 00 

Insurance Examiner 2,500 00 . . .' 

Insurance Stenographer 900 flO . 

Land Clerk 1,800 00 ......... 

Building and Loan Clerk 2.500 00 

Building and Loan Stenographer 900 00 ........ 

Building and Loan Examiners 5,350 00 

Bank Clerk 2.500 00 

Assistant Bank Clerk 900 00 

Second Assistant Bank Clerk 900 00 

Bank Examiners 19.249 96 

Office Expense 1,749 92 

Insurance Contingent 1,599 15 

Building and Loan Examiner's Expense 3,022 24 $11 74 

Bank Examiner's Expense 7,486 15 

Building and Loan Department Fees 13.736 00 

Insurance Examiner's Expense 8,721 80 3.721 80 

Insurance Examiner's Fees 11,900 00 14,712 50 

Insurance Department Fees 85.246 70 

Insurance Taxes 694.466 76 

Bank Examination Fees 28.390 05 

Miscellaneous Bank and Trust Co. Fees 20,866 00 

Land Department Fees 587 90 

Incorporation Fees 684 00 

Miscellaneous Fees 8 50 



$96,782 55 $861,931 95 
Treasurer of State — 

Salary , $7,500 00 

Deputy 2.500 00 

Assistant bookkeeper and stenographer 1.200 00 

Office expense 398 79 



Auditor of State 68 

Disbursements Receipts 

Law books $374 00 

Office expense 536 76 

Escheated estate and other cases 2,860 76 

Anti-trust fund 962 88 

$24,468 97 

Clerk Supreme and Appellate Courts — 

Salary $5,000 00 

Deputy 2,400 00 

Assistant deputy 1,500 00 

Copy clerk 900 00 

Record clerk 1,500 00 

Clerk and stenographer 912 50 

Office expense 718 92 

Supreme Court fees $3,686 70 

Appellate Court fees 5,231 85 

$12,931 42 $8,918 55 
Reporter Supreme and Appellate Courts — 

Salary $5,000 00 

Assistant 2,400 00 

Second assistant \. 2,000 00 

Third assistant 1,000 00 

Office expense 81 87 

$10,481 87 

Supreme Court — 

Judges* salaries T $28,895 69 

Clerk-stenographers 4,833 34 

Librarian 1,800 00 

Messenger and assistant librarian 600 00 

Sheriff 900 00 

Books for law library 2,428 40 

Office and chambers 1,969 28 

$41,426 71 

Appellate Court — 

Judges' salaries $36,000 00 

Clerk-stenographers 6,000 00 

Messenger 1,200 00 

Office, chambers and library 1,961 00 

$45,161 00 

Superior and Circuit Courts — 

Superior Court judges' salaries $58,860 21 

Circuit Court judges' salaries 234,500 00 

Prosecuting attorneys' salaries 33,483 78 

$326,843 99 

Superintendent Public Instruction — 

Salary $5,000 00 ' 

Assistant 2,500 00 

Deputy , 1,800 00 

Clerk 1,400 GO 

Stenographer 900 00 

Office and traveling 1,984 18 

High school inspector salary 2,500 00 

High school inspector expense 848 19 

State board of education 21,178 53 



$38,110 90 



64 Year Book 

state Library — Disbursements Receipts 

Librarian salary $2,500 00 

Boolcs and bindings 6,043 56 $45 40 

Office, supplies and distribution 1,442 08 1 28 

Cabinets 296 28 

Traveling expense 146 81 

Office department 2,000 GO 

Catalog department 4,500 00 

Reference department 3,000 00 

Indiana history and archives 2,998 32 

Additional shelving 165 45 

$23,092 50 $46 68 
Board of Health — 

Secretary salary $3,000 00 

Chief clerk and accountant 1,500 00 

Expense 29,998 15 

Laboratory maintenance 9,996 31 

Food and drugs 19,542 91 

Water laboratory 4,602 67 

Weights and measures 8,777 08 

Leper fund 706 49 

Cold storage 410 00 $410 00 

$78,533 61 $410 00 
Board State Charities — 

Expense $14,976 40 

Agents 16,487 44 

License 1,999 93 

Deportation 949 00 

Outdoor relief 1,892 23 

Transportation 500 00 $500 00 

$36,805 00 $500 00 
Board Tax Commissioners — 

State tax commissioners' salaries $8,988 58 

State tax commissioners' expenses 689 82 

Inheritance tax investigator salary 2,000 00 

Inheritance tax investigator traveling 993 76 

Expenses of board 8,122 99 

$20,795 15 

Board of Accounts — . ^ 

State examiner's salary $4,000 00 

Deputies 6,000 00 

Clerk 2,000 00 

Clerical assistants 15,645 88 $1,150 00 

Office and traveling expense 4,191 05 700 00 

Examination fees 17,354 92 

$49,191 85 $1,850 00 
Board of Forestry — 

Secretary's salary $1,800 00 

Stenographer 720 00 

Commissioners' salaries 400 00 

Commissioners' expense 90 59 

Office and traveling 658 69 

Reservation fund 2,999 55 

Woodlot and exhibit 775 66 

Receipts $174 47 



$7,444 49 $174 47 



Auditor of State 65 

Board of Pardons — Disbursements Receipts. 

Members' salaries $900 00 

Members' expenses 474 32 

Cleric's salary ; 900 00 



^ $8,414 80 



k 



$1,206 20 
Superintendent Public Buildings and Property — 

Salary $2,000 00 

Assistant superintendent 1,200 00 

Assistants 16,972 32 

Repairs 6,995 15 

Water and ice 2,089 75 

Illuminating and power 5,857 65 

5—13956 



$2,274 32 

Industrial Board — 

Expense $80,482 57 

Fees $15,956 65 



$80,482 57 $15,95C 65 
Public Service Commission — 

Salaries and expenses '. $115,751 92 $20,391 53 

Fees 9,098 25 



$115,751 92 $29,489 78 
Department of Geology — 

Geologist's salary $3,000 00 

Clerk 897 50 

Messenger and custodian 720 00 

Expense 3,797 30 



Gas Inspection Department — 

Supervisor's salary $1,800 00 

Expenses 694 66 

Deputy's salary and expense .' 945 00 

Fees 6,490 00 $6,815 00 



$9,929 66 $6,815 00 
State Veterinarian — 

Expense $4,956 47 

Sheep scab 3,786 40 

Diseases of swine 9,835 40 

Foot and mouth disease 130 00 

Receipts $4,650 00 



$18,708 27 $4,650 00 
Oil Inspection Department — 

Supervisor's salary $2,595 86 

Clerk 667 50 

Office expense 258 92 

Traveling expense 48 29 



$3,570 57 

State Entomologist — 

Expense $14,846 04 

License 50 00 $436 00 



$14,896 04 $436 00 
Nancy Hanks Lincoln Burial Ground Com. — 

Expense $1,199 45 

Driveway repair 6 75 



66 Year Book 



Disbursements Receipts 

Roof $249 19 

Flags and decorating 149 00 

Receipts $488 16 



$35,512 96 $488 16 
Engineer State House — 

Chief's salary $1,211 13 

Assistants 5,557 50 

Repairs 5,999 12 

Heating and fuel 5,030 34 $33 64 



$50,000 00 


4,481 


01 


503 35 


590 51 


112,542 


43 


89,149 


96 


110,879 


96 


764 


62 


4.106 


00 


1,074 


50 


1,893 


00 


1.103 


00 


1.128 


00 


2,950 


00 



$17,798 09 $83 64 

Purdue University U. S. Appropriation $50,000 00 

Purdue University Interest on Bonds 17,000 00 

Purdue University Depository Interest 3.179 03 

Indiana University Depository Interest 534 34 

State Normal Depository Interest 456 47 

State Council Defense 97,482 64 

Fish and Game Protective Fund 98,000 08 

Board Industrial Aid Blind 125,879 87 

Historical Commission 4.604 94 

Board Medical Registration and Examination 4.245 29 

Board of Pharmacy 3.192 33 

Board of Pharmacy. A'nti-narcotic 4,976 02 

Board of Embalmers 1,928 03 

Board of Optometry 1,086 76 

Board of Veterinarians 1,133 67 

Board Registration and Examination Nurses 1,876 32 

Emergency and Contingent Specific 226,316 97 

State Parks 20.000 00 

State Board of Agriculture Premiums 10,000 00 

Public Library Commission 12,500 00 

Board of Election Commissioners 554 00 

Academy of Science ". 1,103 04 

Free Employment Office 8,974 95 

Horticultural Society 4,599 95 

Dairymen's Association 394 68 

Tippecanoe Battleground 225 20 

Historical Society 300 00 

Corn Growers' Association 500 00 

Stock Breeders' Association /. 358 38 

Lunacy Commission 81 00 

Board of Certified Accountants 38 18 

State Tax 13 72 1,292,981 19 

Docket Fees 17.538 93 

Transportation Tax 16.422 28 

Vesgel Tonnage Tax 942 33 

Inheritance Tax Ill 27 4.195 50 

Depository Interest, general 87,794 16 

Miscellaneous General ; 1,411 60 

Transfer Warrant 2,391.913 18 

Soldiers' and Sailors' Moniunent — 

Maintenance $12,997 55 

Special 191 49 

Repairs to machinery 148 97 

Receipts and earnings $9,898 99 



$13,338 01 $9,898 99 



Auditor of State 67 

state Soldiers' Home — Disbursements Receipts 

Commandant's salary $1,200 00 

Adjutant's salary 900 00 

Maintenance 179,396 00 

Repairs and painting 5,999 18 

Hospital annex, basement, floor and kitchen 2,134 39 

Ice storage room 697 31 

Extension steam and water line 1,500 00 

Government aid $31,025 00 

Receipts and earniners 1,143 78 



$191,826 88 $32,168 78 
Soldiers' and Sailors Orphans' Home — 

Maintenance $104,740 67 

Repairs 6,998 68 

Agents 656 54 

Officers' salaries 3,626 31 

Library 300 00 

Insurance 399 89 

Tiling 221 78 

Broom factory and vegetable storeroom 360 00 

Bread mixer 335 00 

Gymnasium and playroom, girls' 38 63 $2,000 00 

Receipts and earnings 239 81 



$117,677 50 $2,239 81 
Tuberculosis Hospital — 

Maintenance $66,795 40 $448 80 

Repairs 5,999 90 

Electric pump 2,487 41 

New boiler 2,000. 00 

Receipts from counties 35,331 64 

Receipts from patients 1,114 07 

Receipts and earnings 505 75 

Individual support 12 00 



$77,282 71 $37,412 26 
School for Deaf- 
Maintenance $85,000 00 

Repairs 1,889 14 

Industries 3,970 20 

Painting 945 50 

Receipts and earnings $770 05 

Receipts from counties 552 61 



$91,804 84 $1,322 66 
School for Blind — 

Maintenance $43,000 00 .... 

Repairs 2.348 34 

Remodeling kitchen and equipment 944 12 

Repairing cement walk 1,319 92 

Repairing and repainting 2,946 93 

Carpets, etc., superintendent's residence 500 00 

Receipts and earnings $241 49 



$51,059 31 $241 49 
Central Hospital for the Insane — 

Maintenance $370,507 82 $30,507 82 

Repairs 29.995 46 

Clothing 14,999 77 

Painting 5,179 00 

Reconstruction and repair department, men 13.535 35 



68 Year Book 



Disbursements Receipts 

Plumbing, etc., toilet, women $19,812 19 

Repair and replacing floors 4,946 46 

Receipts and earnings $2,791 78 

Receipts from counties 13,956 75 

Individual support 30,060 49 

Purchasing ground 10,442 19 15,000 00 



„ ,, u .. , T $469,418 24 $92,496 84 
Northern Hospital Insane — - 

Maintenance $201,959 08 $19,894 36 

Repairs 9,854 67 

Clothing 6,995 42 

New laundry and equipment 1,294 02 

Painting 5,000 00 

Receipts and earnings 582 86 

Receipts from counties 7,852 53 

Individual support 5,300 28 

Completing laundry plant 8,152 81 



$225,103 19 $41,782 84 
Eastern Hospital for the Insane — 

Maintenance $168,003 04 $6,071 70 

Repairs 9,988 80 

Clothing , 5,855 36 

Colony extension and improvement 2,857 52 

Farm buildings and equipment 469 53 

Flour mill 5,104 73 10,000 00 

Receipts from counties 4,251 50 

Receipts and earnings '. 475 52 

Individual support 15,058 85 



„ , „ . , , $192,278 98 $35,857 57 
Southern Hospital for the Insane — 

Maintenance $150,144 83 

Repairs 6,136 92 

Clothing 5,930 91 

Receipts and earnings $981 68 

Receipts from counties 5,043 55 

Individual support 637 71 



„ , $162,212 66 $6,662 94 
Southeastern Hospital for the Insane — 

Maintenance $226,750 93 $11,220 75 

Repairs 7,500 00 

Clothing 4,796 39 

Auto and auto truck 1,000 00 

Boiler room improvement 1,362 55 

Remodeling and repairing farm buildings 1,127 12 

Tile -. 1,424 99 2,000 00 

Receipts and earnings 1,256 18 

Receipts from counties 4,971 91 

Individual support 3,302 80 

$243,961 98 
School for Feeble-minded — 

Maintenance $216,384 72 

Repairs and painting 10,000 00 

Railroad and remodeling coal bin 143 60 

Heating plant and equipment colony farm 16,370 00 

Receipts and earnings 

Individual support 



$22,751 64 
$21,303 99 




5,485 
1,098 
8,410 


36 
54 
03 



$242,898 32 $36,297 92 



Auditor of State 69 

Village for Epileptics— Disbursements Receipts 

Maintenance $90,333 07 

Repairs 5,976 69 

Deep wells and equipment 951 58 

Fencing, drainage, etc 6,711 84 

Two cottages and furnishings, male 1,770 00 

Moving and repairing old buildings, erecting silo 3,997 80 

Two and four cottages, female 70 00 

Four corn cribs 616 70 

Cattle and sheep 3,500 00 

Purchase real estate 1,740 00 

Colthing 

Recpipts and earnings 

Individual support 



$1,740 00 


4,147 


54 


3,732 


74 


104 


00 


$9,724 


28 


$6,839 43 



$115,667 68 
Indiana Girls' School — 

Maintenance $88,453 09 

Repairs 4,998 49 

Moving and rebuilding ice plant 4,499 96 

Ad'i'.ition to sewage plant 1,300 00 

Building and equipping cottage, girls 37,999 58 

Receipts and earnings ."^ 15198 

Receipts from counties 41,981 78 



$137,251 12 • $48,973 19 
Indiana Boys' School — 

Maintenance $113,625 00 

Repairs 9,994 06 

Laundry equipment 34 88 

Repairs to boiler and steam plant 1,583 20 $3,000 00 

Receipts and earnings , . ... 4S7 74 

Receipts from counties 57,189 02 



$125,237 14 $60,656.76 
Indiana "Woman's Prison — 

Maintenance $30,805 84 $43 19 

Repairs 1,994 08 

Receipts and earnings 5,381 77 



$32,799 92 $5,424 96 
Indiana Prison — 

. Maintenance $231,033 40 $64,535 83 

Repairs 6,809 65 

Paroled and discharged prisoners . 17,753 11 

Extension walls hospital for insane 142 44 

Canning plant equipment and supplies 5,717 46 

Binder twine 884,115 22 627,073 24 

Farm fund 36 072 76 37,395 14 

Receipts and earnings 56,722 62 



$1,181,644 04 $785,726 83 

Indiana Reformatory — 

Maintenance $213,394 65 $52,635 47 

Repairs '. 9,990 20 

Paroled and discharged prisoners 19,982 88 

Letters, library and amusement 10,146 17 

Trade schools 18,411 95 

Rental of farm and equipment 772 90 

Repair boiler house wall 235 33 

Repair administration building . .' 11,299 75 11,299 75 



70 Year Book 

Disbursements Receipts 

Manufacturing trade school $233,435 33 $224,745 93 

Farm fund 10,077 54 10,30.9 17 

Receipts and earnings 7,486 15 



^^ ^ „ $527,746 70 $306,476 47 
State Farm — 

Maintenance $102,887 69 

Recapturing prisoners and rewards 464 70 

Repair of buildings, roads and fencing 4,999 84 

Brick plant 6,306 73 

Railroad bridge, materials and equipment 10,745 56 

Bakery building and oven accessories 3,340 30 

Stone plant 6,538 50 

Dry press brick machine 3,500 00 $3,500 00 

Industry fund 25,768 20 17,937 17 

Transportation prisoners 4,302 92 

Receipts and earnings 4,281 61 



$164,551 52 $30,021 70 



Totals. General Fund $6,874,117 37 $6,902,290.35 



BENEVOLENT INSTITUTION FUND 

Taxes $7 68 $2,096,653 22 

Transfer warrants 2,096,645 54 



Totals benevolent institution funds $2,096,653 22 $2,096,653 22 

Ea)UCATIONAL INSTITUTION FUND 

Purdue University — 

Two-fifths educational tax $2 15 $587,165 52 

Payroll and miscellaneous 443,533 96 420 50 

Agricultural experiment 75,000 00 

Agricultural extension 30,000 00 

Swine disease 15,000 00 

Creamery license 1,000 00 

Building fund 102,812 80 



T -,. TT • -^ $667,348 91 $587,586 02 
Indiana University — 

Two-fifths educational tax $2 15 $587,165 52 

Payroll and miscellaneous 586,671 48 ,. 



State Normal School- ^'^''^'^ '' ^''''''^ '^ 

One-fifth educational tax $1 08 $293,582 80 

Payroll and miscellaneous 257,640 15 32 61 

Board of visitors 282 66 

Building fund 88,177 27 



$346,101 16 $293,615 41 



Total educational institution funds $1,600,123 70 

VOCATIONAL EDUCATION FUND 

Taxes ' $52 34 

Government Aid 

Depository interest 235 24 

Industrial, agricultural and domestic science 136,166 78 

County agents 45,258 19 



Totals vocational education funds $181,712 55 



$1,468,366 95 


$154,885 60 


44,034 


97 


235 


24 


996 


38 


83 


83 


$200,236 42 



Auditor of State 71 

STATE DEBT SINKING FUND 

Disbursements Receipts 

Taxes $1 15 $148,391 19 

Transfer warrant 295,267 64 



Totals State debt sinking fund $295,268 79 $148,391 19 



COMMON SCHOOL FUND PRINCIPAL 



Sale of state lands 

Swamp lands 

Reclamation state lands 

Escheated estates 

Transfer warrants 



Totals common school fund principal. 






$1,425 50 




50 00 




1,215 86 




196 12 


$195 00 


549 67 


$195 00 


$3,436 65 



SCHOOL REVENUE FOR TUITION FUND 

Taxes $18 79 $3,043,207 09 

School fund interest > 574,195 64 

Unclaimed fees 3,801 75 

Manuscript fees 4,911 08 

Circus fees 2,181 36 

Apportionment 3,475,760 82 

Town and town deficiency 152,118 58 



Totals school revenue for tuition fund $3,627,898 19 $3,628,296 92 

COLLEGE FUND PRINCIPAL 

Loans paid $332 55 

COLLEGE FUND INTEREST 

Interest on loans $150 89 

Professors' salaries $150 89 



Totals college fund interest $150 89 $150 89 

PERMANENT ENDOWMENT FUND PRINCIPAL 

Loans paid $775 00 

Transfer warrant 195 00 



Totals permanent endowment fund principal $970 00 

PERMANENT ENDOWMENT FUND INTEREST 

Interest from counties $45,358 07 

Interest on loan 2 27 

Professors' salaries $45,360 34 



Totals permanent endowment fund interest $45,360 34 $45,360 34 

ROAD FUND 

Fees $1,298.262 08 

Depository interest 16,279 86 

Expenses and refunds $88,871 06 

Apportionment 1,235,162 73 



Totals road fund $1,324,033 79 $1,314,541 94 



72 Year Book 



FIRE MARSHAL FUND 

Disbursements Receipts 

Taxes $46,805 46 

Salaries and expenses $34,997 68 24 34 



Totals Fire Marshal fund $34,997 68 $46,829 80 

HYDROPHOBIA FUND 

Receipts $5,626 28 

Transfers to common school fund principal $549 67 

Salaries and expenses 5,874 27 



Totals hydrophobia fund $6,423 94 $5,626 28 

UNCLAIMED ESTATES 

Receipts $3,857 03 

Paid claimants $162 50 



Totals unclaimed estates $162 50 $3,857 03 

STATE HIGHAVAY FUND 

Inheritance tax $535,676 03 

Salaries and expenses commission $14,915 20 

Highway construction 11,454 06 

Highway inspection 504 41 



Totals state highway fund $26,873 67 $535,676 03 



Totals all funds $16,113,971 63 $16,401,015 56 

UNPAID BILLS 

The Legislature of 1917 specifically "appropriated and placed at the 
disposition of the Governor" $350,000, as an emergency maintenance 
fund for the benefit of the penal and benevolent institutions for the 
fiscal years ending September 30, 1917, and September 30, 1918. 

Of this amount $142,961 was necessary to meet the increased cost of 
maintenance of the institutions for the year ending September 30, 1917, 
leaving $207,039 available for the year ending September 30, 1918. , 

This amount was insufficient and there was a total of $143,319.53 
unpaid maintenance bills at the end of the year. 

The regular appropriation of $10,000 for repairs, made to the In- 
diana Reformatory for the year, was not enough to cover the increased 
repairs necessary to protect the State's property after the fire at the 
institution in February, 1918, and there was a total of $1,065.17 unpaid 
repair bills at the end of the year. 

Before the regular appropriations for the year ending September 30, 
1919, could be drawn upon, these unpaid bills had to be paid. Accord- 
ingly it was agreed by the State Board of Finance that these bills should 
be paid from the balance remaining in the General Fund of the State 
at the close of the year and that the General Assembly would be asked 
to make an appropriation covering these payments. 

BORROWED MONEY • 

During the year 1917, State Councils of Defense were organized in 
every State in the Union to co-operate with the National Council of De- 



Auditor of State 73 

fense. There being no funds available, it was determined to borrow 
money to take care of the necessary expenses of the organization in In- 
diana. For this purpose $100,000 was borrowed and paid into the State 
Treasury. This account is carried in the General Fund of the State and 
expenditures from this account are covered by the usual vouchers, and 
receipts required to be filed before a state warrant can be drawn. 

The General Assembly should be asked to make an appropriation 
sufficient to pay the principal and interest of this loan. 

STATE DEBT 

Purdue University — Non-negotiable bond $340,000 00 

Five per cent stock certificates issued under Act 

1845 and 1846 $3,469 99 

Two and one-half per cent certificates . issued 

under same Acts , 2,145 13— 5,615 12 

Total ^. $345,615 12 

The bond due Purdue University draws 5 per cent interest and ma- 
tures April 1, 1921. There is a balance of $340,000 in the State Debt 
Sinking Fund, which the General Assembly of 1917 ordered to be held 
"until authority be received from the Congress of the United States to 
turn over the same to Purdue University in discharge of the obligation 
* * * by reason of the holding of said fund in trust by the State 
of Indiana for said University." 



74 



Year Book 



TAX LEVIES 

Statement Showing the Tax Levies for Various Purposes as made by the Legislature 
for 1917 and Former Years 



YEAR 


g 
1 

-2 
1 


1§ 




1? 
m 


■% 




'On 
1^ 


c 


1 
1 


§ 

§> 



<2 


II 
1- 


i 

a 

T3 

a 


.2 
1 


§ 
1 

1 
•J 


1850 


25 
25 
20 
20 
15 
20 
20 
20 
25 
20 
15 
15 
15 
20 
20 
25 
25 
20 
20 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
15 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
12 
10 
10 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
12 
12 
12 
9 
9 
9 
9 
9 
7 
7 
7 
7 
4 


















3M 
3.4 


134 


ig 


1 

IH 






1S51 






















185^ 






















1853 






























1«?54 






























1855 

1856 


























































1S57 

1858 








. 


















































1859 






5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
























1860 




























1861 




























1862 
























































1864 




























1865 


16 
16 
16 
16 
18 
16 
16 
16 
16 
IG 
16 
18 
16 
18 
16 
16 




10 




















.01 
.01 
.01 
.01 




1866!,!!!!.!-' 

1867 


10 
























20 
20 
10 
10 
10 























1868^ 

1869 










































1870 
























1871 
























1872 

1873 


















































1874 .. 






















































1876 

1877 






















































1878 




























1879 










2 
2 
2 
2 



















1880 


























1881 


























1SS2 


16 
16 
16 
16 
16 


























1883 


























1884 






5 
5 
5 


















' 




1885 


























1886 

1887 














































1888 


16 

16 

16 

13,4 

13J4 

im 

134 

11 

11 

11 

11 

11 

11 

11 

11 . 

11 

11 

11.6 

11.6 

13.6 

13.6 

13 6 

13.6 

13.6 

13.6 

13.6 

13.6 

13.8 

13.6 

13.6 






5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 
5 






















1889 

1890 














































1891 


6 
6 



5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

5 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 

10 


"3" 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 


5 

5 




















1892 




















1893 




















1894 






















1895 






















1896 






















1897 

1898 






1.664 
1.961^. 






























1899 








1.66M 

1.66% 

1.60% 

1.68% 

2.75 

2.75 

2.75 

2.75 

2.75 

2.75 

2.75 

2.75 

2.75 

2.75 

7. 

7. 

7. 

7. 

7. 

7. 
















1900 

1901 










































1902 






















1903 

1904 










































1905 






















1906 

1907 














































1908 


3 

3 

1.5 

1.5 

1.5 

1.5 

1.5 

1.5 

1.5 






















1909 






















1910 






















1911 
















1912 






















1913 




















1 


1914 

1915 




















1 




















J 


1916 




















1 


1917 




















,5 


ms!!!!!!!!.! 


4 


13.6 






















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Auditor of State 



75 



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76 



Year Book 



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05 00 »0 uo 0> U5 t^ 1— I 1— I oo oo M r-( t^ 0> (M 03 »H l>. U5 U5 Oi 1 



(M O CO O ^H050t>. 



oococo 



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t^i-icooq -^ooco-* c<t n^ <s> ^•:> loot^t^ ostMOio 

t^— ICOO OSiitlt^O 1-1 Cq OS to »Ot^cD00 COO®^^ 



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III! i>iil irii iiii 

^^M>^ ^^11 ^ww^ ^^^:^ 



Sa cs rt.2 o 5 S g 



Auditor of State 



77 



■ O O O O O O >C O ifi lO 'O o 

csiocooi o-^fOTjt (rqiococo 

O IM rji lO i-Hd Tj< <3> >-l CO O -H 



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o oo "O 05 oo^oco 00 00 -^ r^ 

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CO ^ O rH Olt^t-O 'MTJ^-H 
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gsss 

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oocooT 



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lOO O to lO O lO »0 O O O O O lO O O O »0 OOOO _ _ _ . 
,,,■.- COC<lOiO 1— ICOl^CO OSOSi— 100 TtlCSllMCO lOt^lO.— ( 1— (I>.t:^ir5 lOOlOOO 
• C^OO COCOOJ=^ iCOOO-* TtH.-l.-l— I Ot^«00 t^cOCOO OOCOOO'H USCDOt^ 



o »o OO lo o < 



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lO e 



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oSSo S^COC^ OOi-hSo »0C0»0^ CDOO-*-* 10»0 "O^-* C^^r^ CO O CD t^- CO 00 



CO 00 CO CD COOOCOTt< 



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^^ _ OS CO CO »0 to to OS rt< OO CM ■.* CO 

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">ro" co'^HCc'rH — rcocM'Tti 



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(^PizaCQ CQOQCQCC! M CQ H H P>>->- 



"S S s3 § cj'ajlSlS 



78 



Year Book 



»0 CO o t-- 

»-ieo ooo 



o<M r^i-H 



COt-b-<M 



lO OO lO eO C5>ft<Ni-l 



p<i-*i-ie<i CO-*-*-"!* .-H^Mco -*oscoc» eocceoe^ e«'*t»»o 






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CO O «0 lO lOCOi-^t^ OOCO'^'CO 
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<eocoeo eo«ooou3 



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l>-CO>0'>* oot^-«*<co 



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l>.0Ot^0O Ot^OOO OC-I-^^ C<I(MOOO CDOUOOO t- IC t^ (M OO •<*( 05 lO 
eOOOOO OCOCOt^ -"^C^OJO t^b-Tj<lO OOOCOOO (MOCOt^ 00COO5'-" 



J-l CO »-( oo 
I0OC0 05 



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CK) COt^ >O00 1 



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o«^o 



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2ggS 

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ills 


iiii 


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siii 


iiss 


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t^ooosb- 


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oo-Hooo 






3 s Co -M 






fill iili 



Auditor of State 



79 



Oi-HSje^j c»2jrttoo "-(lO^Hos <3>cob-oQ ooiMosr^ OJOt^oo "cooooj •^^-lrtl^^ •owj'S'j 

-HOOOOO 00O51O00 -^COC^IO C00»0?5 .-tT»<COCO ^COC<0t-» t^-tCiC^J C^OiOi'T) CO 'A ^ -if 

»H.-io>'«j* osoi-ioo coioroo lO-^iOiM cor^coec irso»t-~>o coasooco t^cot^o Orroo«) 



'«<P0<NirO lOt^uieo c^coooiM cot^T»<<N 



c^ T'l CO cj CO e>» 



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t^ to 0«5 OO >o < 
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•^00 -J3 
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gco 

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iiii 


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iiii 


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lOWCOr-l 


tOtO^OS 


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(Mt^tot>. 


222=°^ 


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a-s^ ^^^S JJ^« J^^^ 
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sM 



80 



Year Book 



CO^Hi-IO:> lMCD(?ciCO 05l^-«ft~ lOIMCDCO COC^COt-i TtlC<I'^cO eoeo^iM 

CO t^ 1—1 1—1 <M 00 t^ >0 CO lO iO CD OOOiCOr^ oo CD oo 1-1 -^ O 03 Tft 05 1— I O CD 

00 05 i*< t^ r-H CO 1* 1-t CD OC lO C^ O Tt* t^ 00 04 i-< t^ -* lO t^ O t^ OO CO 00 C5 

wi^'co"'^" co'co't-'i-T tjh'm'i-Tim" ic i-Tcd'c^T (C^'i^r ..^".-re^-ccr t^'co'e^'iN 



a'^^. 



2g>. 



105»CO 
SlOCMOi 

-1 T-i (M cvq 


155,845 
703,770 
845,420 
930,450 


109,389 
415,680 
952,360 

772,875 


501,^05 
569,585 
808,810 
119,960 


911,260 
063,820 
115,170 
415,233 


261,095 
172,500 
532,330 
686,230 


529, 115 
830,825 
008.410 
975,010 


sooom 


05 J5 00CO 


in 00 00 «. 


WCOOOIO 


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05inc<i05 


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(MCDCO-H 


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in 00 

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09 05(N^ 






m 



in 1-1 in 
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t^ornm OS o o o 

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CO CO t^ (M 



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m%^ 


iiii 


CO 


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in t-int^ 
inost^c^ 


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c^jinoo 

coi-ioos 

00(MOS(M 


!|1,388 
2,058 
3,377 
3,333 


1,043 

1,369 

6,259 

808 


1,618 
450 

4,109 
797 


^. 


Si 

COi-( 


556 

3,308 

2,922 

. 5,755 


2,258 

1,526 

507 

719 


3,836 
1,686 

1,478 
2,472 



lis 

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J- 



5 g fc.Sf 






Auditor of State 



81 





1 




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ss 


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Auditor of State 87 

REPORT OF THE BANK DEPARTMENT 
Bank Department 

OFFICERS AND EMPLOYES 

OTTO L. KLAUSS, Auditor of State. 

CHAS. W. CAMP, Clerk of Banking Department. 

LOWELL W. COX, Examiner. 

ARTHUR J. LOWE, Examiner. 

RALPH R. BOYERS, Examiner. 

CHAS. F. HURST, Examiner. 

MARK A. WILSON, Examiner. 

WILSON ROOSE, Examiner. 

L. B. HOLLEMAN, Examiner. 

ROBERT BRASS, Examiner. 

KATHERINE W. MAHONEY, Assistant Bank Clerk. 

THOMAS M. BO^SON, Assistant Bank Clerk. 

CHARTER BOARD 

HON. JAMES p. GOODRICH, Governor. 
W. A. ROACH, Secretary of State. 
OTTO L. KLAUSS, Auditor of State. 
CHAS. W. CAMP, Secretary. 

DUTIES OF THE BANK DEPARTMENT 

The Auditor of State has supervision of all the state banks, private 
banks, trust companies, savings banks and mortgage guarantee com- 
panies doing business in the State. 

It is his duty to cause the same to be examined by regularly ap- 
pointed bank examiners at least twice a year, or oftener, if desired. If, 
in the examination of any bank or trust company it develops that the 
same is in an insolvent or failing condition, it becomes the duty of the 
Auditor of State to make application to the Circuit or Superior Court in 
the county in which said institution is located for a receiver, said receiver 
being required to make concurrent reports to the court and Auditor of 
State as long as the receivership shall continue. 

No regularly chartered state bank is under the supervision of the 
Auditor of State until it shall receive its certificate of authority to com- 
mence business from the Secretary of State. 

Regularly chartered trust companies incorporate in the office of the 
Secretary of State, and receive certificate from the Auditor of State to 
commence business when a certification has been made that the capital 
has been paid in in cash. 

Regularly chartered private banks receive a certificate of authority to 
commence business from the Auditor of State upon certification that the 
entire capital has been paid in in cash. 

It is the duty of the Auditor of State to make at least five called 
reports of condition each year of each state bank and trust company 
under his supervision. 



88 



Year Book 



Also, at least two called reports of condition each year from each 
private bank, and annual reports from each savings bank. 

The Auditor of State is a member of the Charter Board, which 
passes on all applications for the organization and incorporation of 
banks and trust companies within the State, the other members of the 
board being the Governor and Secretary of State. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT BANK DEPARTMENT 
Receipts 

Fees, bank examiners ,.. $28,390 05 

Bonds, bank officials 1,317 00 

Miscellaneous » 49 00 

Loan and credit department 19,000 00 

Total $48,756 05 

Disbursements 

Examiners' salaries $19,249 96 

Examiners' expenses 7,486 15 

Total $26,736 11 

Net receipts $22,019 94 

State Banks Incorpjrated and Opened for Business from September 30, 
1917 TO September 30, 1918 



Name 


Location 


Capital 


Incorporated 


Began 
Business 


Veedersburg State Bank. . . 


Veedersburg 

Keystone 

Willow Branch . . . 
Bristol 


$25,000 
25,000 
25,000 
25,000 
50,000 
25,000 
30,000 
50,000 
30,000 
25,000 
25,000 
25,000 
50,000 
25,000 
25,000 
25,000 
25,000 
25,000 
25,000 


Aug. 7,1917 
Aug. 13, 1917 
Oct. 1,1917 
Oct. 1, 1917 
Sept. 19, 1917 
Dec. 19, 1917 
Dec. 5,1917 
Dec. 5,1917 
Dec. 19, 1917 
Oct. 9, 1917 
Dec. 31, 1917 
Oct. 17,1917 
Nov. 7,1917 
Sept. 19, 1917 
June 5,1918 
May 20, 1918 
July 17,1918 
Apr. 17, 1918 
Aug. 6,1918 


Oct. 13, 1917 


State Farmers Bank 


Oct. 29, 1917 


Willow Branch State Bank 


Nov. 24, 1917 


Bristol State Bank 


Dec. 1, 1917 




East Chicago 

Atlanta 


Dec. 17, 1917 


State Bank of Atlanta 


Jan. 1, 1918 


Linden State Bank 




Jan. 1, 1918 


State Exchange Bank 


Culver 


Jan. 4, 1918 


Bremen State Bank 




Jan. 2, 1918 


Farmers State Bank . . 


Topeka. ... 


Feb. 9, 1918 


Lakeville State Bank 

Farmers & Traders State Bank 


Lakeville 

Needham 

Jeffersonville 

Wolf Lake 

Pierceton 

Indianapolis 

LaFontaine 

Gary 

Markleville 


Apr. 1,1918 
Apr. 20, 1918 


Clark County State Bank 

Wolf Lake State Bank 


Apr. 20. 1918 
May 1, 1918 


State Bank of Pierceton 


June 22, 1918 


Brightwood State Bank 


July 2,1918 


Farmers State Bank 


July 20, 1918 




Aug. 1,1918 


The Markleville State Bank 


Aug. 6, 1918 







Re-inc ;rp, ratijNS of State Banks from September 30, 1917 to 
September 30, 1918 



The Farmers & Merchants Bank . 
Randolph County Bank 




December 24, 1917 
September 27, 1918 



CHANGE OF NAME 

German-American Bank, Lawrenceburg, to The American State Bank, January 21, 1918. 
East Side State Bank, Indianapolis, to Irvington State Bank, March 16, 1918. 



Auditor of State - 



89 



REDUCTION OF CAPITAL STJCK 
State Bank of Washington, Washington, from $75,000 to $50,000, January 15, 1918. 

INCREASE OF CAPITAL ST.JCK 
Royal Center State Bank, Royal Center, $5,000, December 31, 1917. 

Note. — The Northern State Bank, Gary, Lake County, was closed by the Auditor of State, August 26, 1918. 
H. G. Hay, Jr., Receiver, appointed August 31, 1918. 

PRIVATE BANKS 

Received Certificates of Authority and Opened for Business from September 30, 1917> 

to September 30, 1918 



Name 


Location 


Capital 


Certificate 
of Authority 


Commenced 
Business 


Peoples Bank 

Farmers Bank 


Freelandville 

Salamonia 

Waverly 


$10,000 
14,000 
10,000 


Aug. 13, 1917 
Aug. 1,1917 
Aug. 26, 1918 


Oct. 20, 1917 
Dec. 22, 1917 


WaverlyBank 


J.. 


Not open. 


Increase of Capital Stock of Private Banks 


The Citizens Bank 


Charlottesville 


$5,000 
5,000 


June 7, 1918 


Peoples Bank 




July 18, 1918 




__ 






Private Banks Retired 



Bank of Atlanta .... 
The Bank of Linden . 



Bremen Bank 

Jacob Sheets Bank . 



Clinton County Bank 

Union Bank 

Farmers & Merchants Bank . 

Exchange Bank 

American Citizens Bank. . . . 
Markleville 



Atlanta . 
Linden.. 
Culver . . 
Bremen . 
Ligonier . 



Frankfort . . 
Lakeville. . . 

Bristol 

Pierceton . . . 

Gary 

Markleville. 



Changed to State Bank January 1, 1918 
Changed to State Bank January 1, 1918 
Changed to State Bank January 4, 1918 
Changed to State Bank January 2, 1918 
Merged with Citizens Bank, Ligonier, 

February, 1918. 
Changed to Trust Co. ^il 3, 1918 
Changed to State Bank April 1, 1918 
Changed to State Bank December 1, 1918 
Changed to State Bank June 21, 1918 
Changed to State Bank August 1, 1918 
Changed to State Bank August 6, 1918 



Note. — ^Bank of Kirkpatrick, Kirkpatrick, was closed by the Auditor of State on February 16, 1918, on account 
of shortages disclosed after death of cashier. Bank was reopened on March 5, 1918. 



TRUST C:^MPANIES 

Incorporated and Opened for Business from September 30, 1917 to September 30, 1918 



■Name 


Location 


Capital 


Incorporated 


Began 
Business 


Lagrange County Trust Company 


Lagrange 


$30,000 
300,000 

40,000 
100,000 
120,000 

25,000 


Feb. 21, 1917 
Nov. 24, 1917 
Mar. 24, 1917 
Mar. 21, 1918 
Mar. 4,1918 
Oct. 17, 1917 


Oct. 6. 1917 


City Trust Company 


Indianapolis 

Winamac ... 


Nov. 28, 1917 


First Trust & Savings Bank 


Dec. 1,1917 


Clinton County Bank & Trust Company 

The Farmers Trust Company 


Frankfort 

Fort Wayne 

Petersburg 


Apr. 1,1918 
Apr. 1,1918 


Peoples Loan & Trust Company 


July 8,1918 







Note. — The Farmers Bank & Trust Company, Rensselaer, incorporated August 6, 1917, but returned articles 
of association to the Secretary of State on November 8, 1917, and dissolved the incorporation. 



90 Year Book 

Trust Companies Ceased Business 

Nashville Savings & Trust Company, Nashville, transferred all business to Nashville State Bank and ceased 
business June 24, 1918. 

The Union Trust Company, Lebanon, petitioned for voluntary liquidation August 7, 19^8, and business was 
transferred to the books of the Boone County State Bank, August 15, 1918. , 

Change of Name 

The German-American Trust & Savings Bank, Richmond, changed its name to American Trust & Savings 
Bank, April 13, 1918. 

The German-American Bank & Trust Company, New Albany, changed its name to American Bank & Trust 
Company, May Term Court, 1918, Floyd County. 

The West Side Trust Company, Indianapolis, changed its name to Washington^Bank & Trust Company, June 
6, 1918. 

The German-American Trust Company, of Fort Wayne, changed its namelo Lincoln Trust Company, Septem- 
ber 4, 1918, by order of the Allen Coimty Circuit Court. 



Auditor of State 



91 



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92 



Year Book 



RESOURCES OF STATE BANKS OF INDIANA, CALL OF AUGUST 31, 1918 



Acton State Bank, Acton... $320,372 20 

State Bank of Advance, Ad- 
vance 291,407 70 

State Bank of Akron, Akron. 174,091 19 

Albany State Bank, Albany. . 284,392 26 

Farmers State Bank, Albion.. 448,598 00 

Alert State Bank, Alert 163,585 55 

Amboy State Bank, Amboy. . 381,339 41 

Farmers & Merchants Bank, 

Ambia 139,793 48 

Anderson Banking Company, 

Anderson 1,814,052 42 

The Citizens Bank, Anderson. 1,836,567 30 

The State Bank of Andrews, 

Andrews 269,259 90 

Steuben County State Bank, 

Angola 184,272 40 

Areola State Bank, Areola... 234,195 63 

Citizens State Bank. Argos. . 291,987 37 

State Bank of Atlanta, At- 
lanta 273,555 74 

Farmers & Merchants Bank, 

Attica 1,100,320 07 

Auburn State Bank, Auburn 540,744 32 

Aurora State Bank, Aurora. . 347,926 50 

Austin State Bank, Austin... 107,181 51 

The Farmers State Bank, 

Bainbridge . 212,659 34 

Farmers State Bank, Bar- 

gersville 328,176 52 

The Batesville Bank, Bates- 

ville 633,256 14 

Battle Ground State Bank, 

Battle Ground 218.429 54 

Stone City Bank, Bedford 663,366 66 

Beech Grove State Bank, 

Beech Grove 156,292 40 

Bank of Berne, Berne 516,556 30 

Peoples State Bank, Berne... 413,371 68 

Bippus State Bank, Bippus. . 223,883 70 

Bloomfield State Bank, Bloom- 
field 481,813 70 

Citizens State Bank, Bloom- 
field 209,178 80 

Monroe County State Bank, 

Bloomington 437,298 18 

The Studebaker Bank, Bluff- 
ton 2,006,723 95 

The Wells County Bank, 

Bluffton 1,260,993 85 

Borden State Bank, Borden.. 227,229 05 

Farmers & Merchants Bank, 

Boswell 359,615 65 

Farmers State Bank, Boston. 175,144 77 

Bourbon Banking Company, 

Bourbon 179,162 94 

First State Bank, Bourbon... 785,699 69 

Bremen State Bank, Bremen. 280,626 59 

Union State Bank, Bremen.. 550,257 35 

Bristol State Bank, Bristol.. 223,856 76 



Broad Ripple State Bank, 
Broad Ripple 

Bank of Brookston, Brook- 
ston 

Farmers Bank of Brookston, 
Prookston 

Brownsburg State Bank, 
Brownsburg 

Brownstown State Bank, 
Brbwnstown 

Citizens State Bank, Browns- 
town 

Bruccville State Bank, Bruce- 
ville 

Farmers & Merchants Bank, 
Bryant 

Farmers State Bank, Bun- 
ker Hill 

State Bank of Burnettsville, 
Burnetts Creek 

Burlington State Bank, Bur- 
lington 

Burney State Bank, Burney. . 

Knisely Bros. & Company 
Bank, Butler 

Butlerville State Bank, But- 
lerville 

Farmers State Bank, Camden 

State Bank of Campellsburg, 
Campellsburg 

Peoples State Bank, Carlisle.. 

Citizens State Bank, Carmel. 

Centerville State Bank, Cen- 
terville 

Bank of Chalmers, Chalmers.. 

State Bank of Chalmers, 
Chalmers 

Bank of C h a r 1 e s t o w n, 
Charlestown 

Chesterton Bank, Chesterton. 

The Chrisney State Bank, 
Chrisney 

The Farmers State Bank, 
Churubusco 

Exchange Bank, Churubusco. 

State Bank of Clarks Hill, 
Clarks Hill 

Clarksburg State Bank, 
Clarksburg 

State Bank of Claypool, Clay- 
pool 

Clayton State Bank, Clayton 

Citizens Bank, Clinton 

Farmers State Bank, Colfax. 

Central State Bank, Conners- 
ville 

Farmers State Bank, Con- 
verse 

The Citizens Bank, Coving- 
ton 



$291,215 91 

380,281 30 

284,196 77 

255,916 92 

156,045 24 

253,110 53 

185,793 54 

234,874 40 

187,649 09 

258,666 48 

213,795 83 
164,048 63 

507,803 37 

171,713 96 
176,138 15 

272,722 77 
651,677 02 
262,081 81 

800,131 15 
231,171 26 

227.695 91 

394,885 76 
405,359 90 

264,785 79 

246,524 16 
419,190 28 

132,601 00 

246,392 05 

163,000 57 
206,891 49 
777,381 08 
231,997 32 

409,340 39 

402,683 76 

467,538 66 



Auditor of State 



93 



Fr.i mers State Bank, Cvaigs- 

ville $115,879 33 

Orawfordsville State Bank, 
Crawfordsville • 955,731 57 

Cromwell State Bank, Crom- 
well 270,628 72 

Sparta State Bank, Crom- 
well 93,989 66 

Cross Plains State Bank, 

Cross Plains 163,665 18 

Citizens State Bank, Croth- 
ersville 66,792 24 

Crothersville State Bank, 

Crothersville 374^979 17 

Commercial Bank, Crown 

Point 434, 'Ml 74 

Peoples State Bank, Crown 

Point 840,000 97 

State Exchange Bank, Cul- 
ver 501,509 65 

Cynthiana Banking Company, ' 

Cynthiana 326,445 69 

Dale State Bank, Dale 193,555 11 

Bank of Dana, Dana 402,794 34 

Danville State Bank, Danville 293,737 91 

Darlington State Bank, Dar- 
lington 236,088 16 

Farmers & Merchants State 

Bank, Darlington 282,305 05 

Old Adams County Bank, De- 
catur 1,248,331 70 

Farmers & Merchants Bank, 
Decker 178,418 83 

Delphi State Bank, Delphi.. 627,440 14 

Dillsboro State Bank, Dills- 
boro 343,643 26 

Farmers State Bank, Dubois. 178,735 88 

The Dugger State Bank, Dug- 

ger 337,231 09 

Citizens State Bank, Dunkirk 183,284 61 

First State Bank, Dunkirk.. 538,400 06 

Dupont State Bank, Dupont. 107,495 52 

Earl Park State Bank, Earl 

Park 157,842 17 

American State B^nk, East 

Chicago 842,398 91 

East Chicago State Bank, 

East Chicago 802,926 58 

Eaton State Bank, Eaton 161,763 23 

Farmers State Bank, Eaton.. 420,859 11 

The Edwardsport Bank. Ed- 

wardsport 130,67123 

Elberfeld State Bank, Elber- 

feld 340,666 95 

St. Joe Valley Bank. Elk- 
hart 2,699,968 32 

Peoples State Bank, Elletts- 

ville 136,403 03 

Citizens State Bank, Elwood. 624,659 48 
Elwood State Bank, Elwood. . 898,582 37 
Farmers State Bank, Emi- 
nence 207,921 89 



Crawford County State Bank, 

English $553,299 29 

Mercantile-Commercial Bank, 

Evansville 2,310,673 46 

Farmers & Citizens Bank- 

Howell, Evansville 372,857 9S 

The Lamasco Bank, Evans- 
ville 482,529 48 

North Side Bank, Evansville 789,688 13 

West Side Bank, Evansville. . 2,714,810 77 

Fairbanks State Bank, Fair- 
banks 200,457 17 

Citizens State Bank, Fair- 
mount 236,935 52 

Fairmount State Bank, Fair- 
mount 360,965 91 

Citizens State Bank, Farmers- 
burg 226,102 87 

Farmland State Bank, Farm- 
land 296.495 74 

Beckman State Bank, Ferdi- 
nand 197,251 98 

Union State Bank, Flat Rock 127,100 80 

Florence Deposit Bank, Flor- 
ence 108,634 00 

The Fortville State Bank, 

Fortville 486,163 42 

Farmers State Bank, Foun- 
taintown 132,233 97 

Bank of Benton County, Fow- 
ler 495,733 46 

State Bank of Francesville, 

Francesville 378,07 i 80 

Francisco State Bank, Fran- 
cisco 142,194 48 

Farmers Bank, Frankfort. . . 1,172.290 76 

The Freelandville Bank, Free- 
landville 190,308 06 

First State Bank, Fremont. . 313,893 34 

French Lick State Bank, 

French Lick 326.760 81 

Friendship State Bank, 

Friendship 160,298 68 

Fulton State Bank, Fulton.. 269.825 75 

First State Bank, Galveston. 228,030 52 

Garrett State Bank, Garrett.. 548,475 42 

American State Bank, Gary. 171,055 94 

Gary State Bank, Gary 3,332,653 15 

First State Bank-Tolleston, 

Gary 278,904 28 

First State Bank, Gas City. . 292,878 93 

Gaston Banking Company, 

Gaston 262.106 79 

Ban!< of Geneva, Genei\\ 351,888 01 

Farmers & Merchants State 

Bank, Geneva 265,746 56 

Georgetown State Bank, 

Georgetown 135,844 12 

Glenwood State Bank, Glen- 
wood 273,523 06 

State Bank of Goshen, 

Goshen 444,229 29 



94 , Year 

Grabill State Bank, Grabill. . $287,658 97 

Grandview Bank, Grand- 
view 318,478 74 

Capital State Bank, Green- 
field 374,596 20 

The Greenfield Banking Com- 
pany, Greenfield 723,095 31 

State Bank of Greentown, 
Greentown 487,078 25 

Hamlet State Bank, Hamlet. 223,525 23 

Hanover Deposit Bank, Han- 
over 85,537 09 

Harlan State Bank, Harlan.. 196,444 24 

Blackford County Bank, 

Hartford City '. 699,969 25 

Citizens State Bank, Hart- 
ford City 1,167,890 64 

The Haubstadt Bank, Haub- 

stadt 474,357 46 

Citizens State Bank, Hazle- 
ton 379.955 20 

The Citizens Bank, Hebron. 318,361 48 

Henryville State Bank, Hen- 
ryville 238,497 22 

Hillsboro State Bank, Hills- 
boro 219,838 48 

Hoagland State Bank, Hoag- 
land 183,814 47 

First State Bank, Hobart 420,027 23 

Farmers State Bank, Hobbs.. 158,936 96 

Holton State Bank, Holton... 208,949 62 

Hope State Bank, Hope 199,387 44 

Farmers State Bank, Hudson 162,522 58 

The Huntingburg Bank, 

Huntingburg 634,784 81 

Citizens State Bank, Hunt- 
ington 1,376,042 16 

Huntington County Bank, 

Huntington 1,516,733 60 

Huntertown State Bank, 
Huntertown 158,544 47 

Hymera State Bank, Hy- 
mera 376,303 00 

State Bank of Idaville, Ida- 
ville 225,817 91 

Brightwood State Bank, In- 
dianapolis 66,741 22 

Citizens State Bank, In- 
dianapolis 545,303 93 

East Tenth Street State 
Bank, Indianapolis 286,684 59 

Fountain Square State Bank, 
Indianapolis 483,273 16 

Irvington State Bank-Irving- 
ton, Indianapolis 300,154 56 

Live Stock Exchange Bank, 
Indianapolis 1,633,682 53 

Marion County State Bank, 

Indianapolis 619,059 40 

Meyer-Kiser Bank, Indian- 
apolis 1,194,615 08 



Book 

Northwestern State Bank, 

Indianapolis , $303,871 66 

Peoples State Bank, Indian- 
apolis 1,046,852 38 

South Side State Bank, In- 
apolis 712,140 84 

J. F. Wild & Company Bank, 

Indianapolis 2,132,965 39 

Citizens State Bank, James- 
town 532,190 98 

The Peoples State Bank, 

Jasonville 412,104 04 

Dubios County State Bank, 

Jasper 473,483 64 

Farmers & Merchants State 

Bank, Jasper 373,566 91 

German-American Bank, Jas- 
per 260,130 45 

Clarke County State Bank, 
Jeffersonville 173,817 63 

Jonesville State Bank, Jones- 
ville 134,268 82 

State Bank of Kempton, 
Kempton 364,695 35 

Noble County Bank, Kendall- 
ville 1,112,883 20 

Discount and Deposit State 

Bank, Kentland 736,017 75 

Kent State Bank, Kentland. 457,686 33 

First State Bank, Kewanna. 418,592 04 

State Farmers Bank, Key- 
stone 59,536 88 

State Bank of Kimmell, Kim- 
mell 79.194 22 

Farmers State Bank, Kirk- 
lin 235,185 23 

Farmers State Bank, Knox.. 490,446 45 

South Kokomo Bank, Ko- 
komo 95,488 26 

Citizens State Bank, La- 
crosse 332,900 40 

Citizens State Bank,. La- 
doga 474,104 39 

Farmers & Traders Bank, La- 
fayette 3,479,757 67 

Farmers State Bank, La- 
fontaine 78,294 96 

Lagrange State Bank, La- 
grange 556,410 38 

Citizens State Bank, Lagro.. 219,697 42 

Lake State Bank, Lake 223,156 83 

Laketon State Bank, Lake- 
ton 155,103 81 

Lakeville State Bank, Lake- 
viUe 99,149 32 

Farmers State Bank, Lanes- 
viUe 161,172 40 

Farmers State Bank, Lapaz. 197,156 12 

State Bank of Lapel, Lapel. 250,763 62 

A. P. Andrew Jr. & Son 

Bank, Laporte 2,267,244 26 



Auditor of State 



95 



113.650 44 

274,599 27 

207,303 31 

638,239 15 

754,867 49 

258,788 09 
141,686 09 

288,264 90 



Bank of State of Indiana, 

Laporte $1,341,781 

Lawrence State Bank, Law- 
rence 

The American State Bank, 
Lawrenceburg 

Leavenworth State Bank, 
Leavenworth 

Boone County State Bank, 
Lebanon 

Farmers State Bank, Leb- 
anon 

Peoples State Bank, Lees- 
burg 

Letts State Bank, Letts 

Liberty Center Deposit Bank, 
Liberty Center 

The Citizens Bank, Ligonier. 882,917 66 

Mier State Bank, Ligonier... 872,989 39 

Linden State Bank, Linden. 267J688 99 

Linnsburg State Bank, Linns- 
burg 137,333 97 

Farmers & Merchants State 
Bank, Logansport 935,342 86 

Logansport State Bank, Log- 
ansport 1,456,268 35 

The White River Bank, Loo- 

gootee 422,099 75 

Lucerne State Bank, Lu- 
cerne 208,151 76 

Citizens Banking Company, 
Lynn 478,183 67 

Com Exchange Bank, Lyons. 119.016 13 

Marion State Bank, Marion,. 1,533,063 67 

South Marion State Bank, 
Marion 

Farmers & Traders Bank, 
Markle 

Markleville Stkte Bjank, Mar- 
kleville 

Farmers State Bank, Mat- 
thews 

Medaryville State Bank, 
Medaryville 

Citizens State Bank, Me- 
dora 

Medora State Bank, Medora.. 202.015 09 

Merom State Bank, Merom. . 115.915 93 

Farmers State Bank, Mex- 
ico 180,978 30 

The Citizens Bank, Michigan 

City 2,152,086 84 

Peoples State Bank, Mich- 
igantown 200,052 53 

First State Bank, Middle- 
bury 340.933 58 

The Farmers State Bank, 
Middletown 515,624 28 

Farmers State Bank, Miami. 182,441 81 

The State Bank of Milan, 
Milan 431,430 85 



100,604 37 
383,672 51 
267,906 09 
161,556 55 
249,120 95 
116,209 11 



Farmers State Bank, Mil- 
ford $137,362 51 

Millersburg State Bank, Mil- 

lersburg 232,063 97 

Mongo State Bank, Mongo. . . 160,994 65 

State Bank of Monon, 
Monon 283,080 66 

Monroe State Bank, Mon- 
roe 145,973 04 

Monroe City State Bank, Mon- 
roe City 155,756 47 

Citizens State Bank, Mon- 
roeville 393,041 26 

Farmers State Bank, Monti- 
cello 143,635 35 

State Bank of Monticello, 
Monticello 519,070 87 

Montmorenci State Bank, 

Montmorenci 267,515 85 

Farmers Deposit Bank, Mont- 
pelier 450,613 50 

Mooreland State Bank, Moore- 
land 262,619 88 

Moores Hill State Bank, 

Moores Hill 170,653 01 

Farmers Bank, Mooresville .. 475,535 96 

Citizens State Bank, Mo- 
rocco 268,247 95 

Farmers State Bank, Mo- 
rocco - 197,367 87 

Union State Bank, Morris- 
town 259,739 40 

Mulberry State Bank, Mul- 
berry 481.167 02 

Farmers Savings Bank, 
Muncie 276,899 89 

Napoleon State Bank, Napo- 
leon 191,986 81 

Farmers & Traders Bank, 
Nappanee 442,315 66 

Nashville State Bank, Nash- 
ville ., 187,215 95 

Farmers & Traders State 

Bank, Needhara 60,386 63 

Floyd County Bank, New 
Albany 508,429 04 

New Augusta State Bank, 

New Augusta 176,871 86 

Citizens State Bank, New- 
castle 1,517,611 89 

New Haven State Bank, 

New Haven 439,132 26 

The Peoples State Bank, 

New Haven 181,025 75 

Farmers State Bank, New 
Market 233,178 11 

First State Bank, Newpoint 192,925 04 

Citizens State Bank, New- 
port 155,220 01 

Corn Exchange State Bank, 
New Richmond 229,967 32 



96 



Year Book 



New Salem State Bank, New 

Salem $100,089 88 

New Washington State Bank, 

New Washington 209,910 95 

Citizens State Bank, Nobles- 

ville 941,608 49 

First State Bank, North Jud- 

son 583.907 40 

North Liberty State Bank, 

North Liberty 353,232 23 

Farmers State Bank, North 

Madison 67.857 46 

Indiana State Bank, North 

Manchester 523.785 65 

Farmers State Bank, North 

Webster 121,997 85 

Oaklandon State Bank, Oak- 
landon 98,656 88 

Columbia State Bank, Oak- 
land City 239,077 51 

Oaktown Bank, Oaktown 411,610 60 

Farmers State Bank, Oak- 
ville 122,507 56 

Farmers State Bank, On- 
ward .' 120,310 14 

Citizens State Bank, Orland. 208.341 12 

Citizens State iank, Orleans. 279.089 42 

The Osgood Bank, Osgood. . . 172,113 67 

Ripley County Bank, Osgood. 717,226 71 

Farmers State Bank, Ossian. 236,522 00 

Farmers & Merchants Bank, 

Otterbein 356,466 47 

State Bank of Otterbein, 

Otterbein 443,445 97 

Otwell State Bank, Otwell. . . 286,731 61 

Owensville Banking Com- 
pany, Owensville 248,892 60 

The State Bank of Oxford, 

Oxford 261,408 71 

Orange County Bank, Paoli. . 344,479 54 

Paoli State Bank, Paoli 241.174 12 

Paragon State Bank. Par-- 

agon 166,826 03 

Paris Crossing State Bank, 

Paris Crossing 127,714 69 

Parker Banking Company, 

Parker 241,510 35 

Patriot Deposit Bank, Pa- 
triot 163,118 93 

Citizens State Bank, Pekin.. 216,083 68 

Pendleton Banking Company, 

Pendleton 490,868 86 

Peoples State Bank, Penn- 

ville 156,092 72 

Citizens State Bank, Peters- 
burg 556,874 44 

State Bank of Pierceton, 
Pierceton 89,539 33 

Citizens State Bank, Plain- 
field 303,521 96 

First State B,ank, Pleasant 
Lake 127,581 71 



Plymouth State Bank, Ply- 
mouth $876,945 56 

Farmers State Bank, Poneto. 154.138 29 

The Citizens Bank, Portland. 751,713 02 

Farmers State Bank, Port- 
land 274,250 75 

The Peoples Bank, Portland. 1,114,789 28 

Farmers State Bank, Preble. 141,425 21 

Raub State Bank, Raub 144,668 64 

Bank of Red Key, Red Key... 575,038 88 

Farmers State Bank. Red 

Key 280,896 21 

State Bank of Remington, 
Remington 587,416 71 

State Bank of Rensselaer, 
Rensselaer 516,661 22 

Bank of Reynolds, Rey- 
nolds 257,507 19 

Ridgeville State Bank, Ridge- 

ville 312,575 57 

Rising Sun Deposit Bank, 

Rising Sun 349,213 64 

Roachdale Bank, Roachdale.. 617,948 49 

State Exchange Bank, Roann 309.817 82 

State Bank of Roanoke, 
Roanoke 329.865 48 

Farmers State Bank. Roan- 
oke 178.528 60 

The Farmers Bank. RoQk- 

port 288,037 15 

Old Rockport Bank, Rock- 
port 346,252 58 

Parke State Bank, Rock- 

ville 871,170 62 

Farmers State Bank, Ross- 
ville 159,320 47 

Citizens State Bank. Royal 

Center 290.178 97 

The Royal Center State 

Bank. Royal Center :. 320.756 73 

State Bank of Russellville, 

Russellville 163,278 46 

Citizens State Bank, Salem. . 338,425 44 

Farmers State Bank, Salem.. 258,978 69 

Sandborn Banking Company, 

Sandborn 242,306 89 

Saratoga State Bank, Sara- 
toga 200.312 30 

Scottsburg State Bank. 

Scottsburg 322,333 03 

Scott County State Bank, 

Scottsburg 262,677 38 

Sellersburg State Bank, Sel- 
lersburg 176.286 52 

Farmers State Bank, Sheldon 201,750 33 

American State Bank, Sheri- 
dan 238,284 12 

Farmers State Bank, Ship- 

shewanna 228.123 04 

Martin County Bank, Shoals 259,584 87 

Commercial State Bank, Sil- 
ver Lake 198,947 67 



Auditor of State 



97 



Chapin State Bank, South 

Bend $729,419 63 

Farmers State Bank, South 

Whitley 301,698 13 

Gandy State Bank, South 
Whitley 341,429 52 

The Exchange Bank, Spencer 335,337 33 
Farmers and Merchants State 
Bank, Spencerville 139,515 92 

First State Bank, Star City 337,092 25 

The Citizens State Bank, 

Stilesville 148,344 49 

St. Joe Valley Bank, St. Joe 150,620 17 

The State Bank of Stock- 
well, Stockwell 244,661 38 

Farmers State Bank, Stroh. . 175,819 18 

The Peoples State Bank, Sul- 
livan 1.145,586 10 

Sullivan State Bank, Sullivan 781,1|69 10 

The Sunman Bank, Sunman. 399,637 60 

Farmers State Bank, Sweet- 
ser 299,266 77 

State Bank of Syracuse, 

Syracuse 383,083 09 

Citizens State Bank, Tab 154,725 64 

Indiana State Bank, Terre 

Haute 316.227 30 

State Bank of Thorntown, 
Thorntown 384,588 63 

Tippecanoe State Bank, Tip- 
pecanoe 76,480 33 

Farmers State Bank, Topeka 103,688 81 

State Bank of Topeka, To- 
peka 336,697 56 

Troy State Bank, Troy 219,419 03 

Twelve Mile State Bank, 

Twelve Mile 255,081 23 

State Bank of Uniondale, 
Uniondale 260 976 51 

The Atlas State Bank, Union 

City 643.865 38 

Upland State Bank, Upland. . 191,613 68 

Farmers State Bank, Urbana 211,511 14 

Vallonia State Bank, Vallonia 197,266 48 

State Bank of Valparaiso, 
Valparaiso 870 552 90 

Van Buren State Bank, Van 

Buren 434,589 86 

The Farmers State Bank, 

Veedersburg 213,317 92 

Veedersburg State Bank, 
Veedersburg 113,304 29 

The Versailles Bank, Ver- 
sailles 375,703 09 

Vevay Deposit Bank, Vevay. . 544,973 44 

Vincennes State Bank, Vin- 

cennes 374,746 03 

Farmers State Bank, Walker- 
ton 175,126 82 



State Bank of Walkerton, 

Walkerton $333,484 28 

Cass County State Bank, 

Walton 340.603 74 

State Bank of Wanatah, 

Wanatah 315,547 90 

Lake City Bank, Warsaw 425.707 02 

State Bank of Warsaw. War- 
saw 1,015,899 89 

State Bank of Washington. 

Washington 322.356 92 

State Bank of Waveland, 

Waveland 285,955 34 

Farmers State Bank, Wawaka 98,319 19 
Waynetown State Bank, 

Waynetown 342,994 55 

Farmers State Bank, West 

College Corner, 821,722 98 

State Bank of Westfield, 

Westfield 177,233 69 

Purdue State Bank, West 

Lafayette 241,643 54 

State Bank of West Terre 

Haute, West Terre Haute. . 493,923 44 
Bank of Whiting, Whiting. . 1,294,908 92 
Central State Bank, Whiting-. 145.415 89 
Warren County Bank, Wil- 

liamsport 334,906 81 

Williamsport State Bank, 

Williamsport 502,873 18 

Willow Branch State Bank, 

Willow Branch 75,265 84 

Farmers and Merchants 

Bank, Winchester 624,597 12 

Randolph County Bank, 

Winchester 479,043 70 

Farmers State Bank, Wind- 
fall 125,550 09 

The Peoples State Bank, 

Windfall 433,323 86 

The Farmers Bank, Wingate 367,343 17 
State Bank of Wolcott, Wol- 

cott 350,410 66 

The Citizens Bank, Wolcott. . 201,519 60 
State Bank of Wolcottville, 

Wolcottville 290.081 51 

Wildman State Bank, Wol- 
cottville 203,809 03 

Woodburn Banking Company, 

Woodburn 195,920 17 

Commercial State Bank, 

Worthington 268,639 59 

Worthington Exchange State 

Bank, Worthington 234,979 97 

Wolf Lake State Bank, Wolf 

Lake 37,819 89 

Farmers State Bank, Young 

America 141,762 14 



$176,172,511 20 



7—13956 



98 



Year Book 



RESOURCES OF PRIVATE BANKS OF INDIANA, CALL OF AUGUST 31, 1918 



Akron Exchange Bank, Ak- 
ron $668,567 83 

Alexandria Bank, Alexandria 631,084 55 

Central Bank, Arcadia 158,790 87 

Arlington Bank, Arlington. . 243,826 43 

Commercial Bank, Ashley 99,752 68 

Merchants and Farmers 

Bank, Avilla 262,087 39 

Farmers Bank, Bentonville. . 68,771 09 

Citizens Bank, Bicknell 287,050 42 

Bank of Bloomingdale, Bloom- 

ingdale 129.538 59 

Showers Bros. Savings Com- 
pany, Bloomington 50,941 77 

Blountsville Bank, Blounts- 

ville 112,854 91 

Bank of Brook, Brook 652,647 70 

Peoples Deposit Bank, Brook- 
lyn 90,437 48 

Hunter Bank, Brownsburg. . . 355,871 77 

Browns Valley Bank, Browns 

Valley 94,166 71 

Bank of Seward, Burket 97,571 57 

Camden Bank, Camden 259,628 99 

Carbon Bank, Carbon 157,136 49 

Farmers Banking Company, 

Carlos 111,831 31 

The Bank of Carthage, Carth- 
age 453,973 74 

The Cates Bank, Gates 80,072 60 

Citizens Bank, Charlottesville 126,628 56 

Farmers Bank, Clarks Hill. . 168,540 96 

Farmers & Merchants Bank, 

Clay City 315,924 16 

Colfax Bank, Colfax 354,504 38 

Irwin's Bank, Columbus 1,593,099 96 

The Citizens Bank, Com- 

miskey 64,385 44 

Thomas Exchange Bank, Cor- 

unna 129,571 98 

The Citizens Bank, Cory 154,548 86 

Cumberland Bank, Cumber- 
land 213,460 85 

The Commercial Bank, Dale- 

ville 147,232 80 

The Peoples Banking Com- 
pany, Darlington 167,065 30 

Bank of Dayton, Dayton 174,490 48 

A. T. Bowen & Company 

Bank, Delphi 1,547,344 63 

Bank of Demotte, Demotte. . . 63,358 05 

Farmers Bank, Denver 171,268 40 

Jefferson County Bank, Dep- 
uty 106,391 08 

The Bank of East Enterprise, 

East Enterprise 112,250 39 

Northern Wayne Bank, Econ- 
omy 122,272 51 

Thompson's Bank, Edinburg. 717,864 90 



The Elizabeth Bank, Eliza- 
beth $76,976 83 

Farmers & Merchants Bank, 

Elizabethtown 181,297 98 

The Citizens Bank, Elnora. .. 228,995 11 

Etna Bank, Etna Green ■ 404,416 41 

Fahnouth Bank. FaUnouth. . 159,469 96 

The Farmers Bank, Fillmore 132,946 20 

Citizens Bank, Forest 126,839 03 

Commercial Bank, Fort 

Wayne 406,649 98 

Puttman & Company Bank, 

Fort Wayne 96,309 81 

Fountain Bank, Fountain 

City 187,620 09 

Fowlertown Bank, Fowler- 
town 91,683 67 

Frankton Bank, Frankton... 196,273 91 

Bank of Fredericksburg, 

Fredericksburg 75,777 40 

Peoples Bank, Freelandville. . 53.689 41 

Farmers Bank, Freetown 82,232 97 

G. W. Conwell Bank, Galves- 
ton 239,541 20 

Salem Bank, Goshen 862,647 83 

Gosport Bank, Gosport 196,490 72 

Gosport Banking Company, 

Gosport 252,638 60 

Citizens Bank, Greenfield 433,123 81 

The Gwynnville Bank, 

Gwynnville •. 128,235 72 

Bank of Hammond, Ham- 
mond 72,306 48 

Hamilton Bank, Hamilton... 273,727 90 

Farmers & Merchants Bank, 

Hanna 153,892 78 

Bank of Hardinsburg, Har- 

dinsburg 220,434 21 

Farmers Bank, Hazelwood. . 110,374 08 

Farmers & Merchants Bank, 

Highland 77,905 62 

Hobart Bank, Hobart 306,621 65 

Hillisburg Bank, Hillisburg. . 122,516 17 

State Bank of Lima, Howe. . 417,929 11 

Citizens Bank, Jonesboro 166,828 44 

Campbell & Fetter Bank, 

Kendallville 394,863 92 

Kennard Bank, Kennard 143,51108 

Bank of Kingman, Kingman 153,245 49 

Citizens Bank, Kingman 162,103 04 

The Bank of Kirkpatrick, 

Kirkpatrick 98,330 08 

Porter County Bank, Kouts. . 231,572 67 

Lafontaine Bank, Lafontaine 363,276 13 

Farmers & Merchants Bank, 

Laotto 128,187 37 

Larwill Bank, Larwill 114,782 92 

Laurel Bank, Laurel 111,339 31 

Leiters Ford Bank, Leiters 

Ford 137,205 04 



Auditor of State 



99 



Lexington Bank, Lexington.. $130,975 18 

Citizens Bank, Liberty 377,065 03 

Bank of Linn Grove, Linn 

Grove 104,169 10 

Bank of Lizton, Lizton 172,800 59 

Farmers Bank, Losantville. . . 193,600 07 

Bank of Lyons, Lyons 159,292 28 

Citizens Bank, Macy 219,727 16 

The Manilla Bank, Manilla. . 460,379 21 

Farmers Bank, Marco 104,088 24 

Bank of Marengo, Marengo. . 191,275 13 

Citizens Bank, Marshall 193,549 57 

The Mecca Bank, Mecca 93,804 17 

The Mellott Bank, Mellott... 147,600 23 

Farmers Bank, Mentone 758,014 20 

The Farmers Bank, Meta- 

mora 115,393 55 

The Banking House of Miles 

& Higbee, Milford 212,9,53 16 

The Milroy Bank. Milroy 326,799 13 

Farmers Bank, Milton 185,656 97 

Bank of Mitchell, Mitchell. . . 381,909 63 

The Citizens Banking Compa- 
ny, Modoc 209,507 05 

The Mohawk Bank, Mohawk. 158,087 03 

The Mount Summit Bank, 

Mount Summit 122,950 94 

The Monon Bank, Monon 296,248 26 

The Citizens Bank, Monte- 
zuma 168,203 18 

Farmers & Merchants Bank, 

Montgomery 122,908 68 

Farmers Bank, Mooreland... 96,861 81 

The Bank of Mt. Ayr, Mt. 

Ayr 133,900 02 

Muncie Banking Company, 

Muncie 23,874 67 

Citizens Bank, Newberry . 143,612 54 

The Farmers Bank, New- 
burgh 378,608 14 

New Harmony Banking Com- 
pany, New Harmony 487,153 25 

The Farmers Bank, New Lis- 
bon 109,993 18 

New Palestine Bank, New 

Palestine 339,424 31 

The New Paris Bank, New 

Paris 186,370 33 

R. H. Nixon & Company, 

Newport 273,600 18 

The Citizens Bank, New Ross 165,815 86 

The Newtown Bank, New- 
town 173,377 06 

Farmers Bank, North Grove 63,532 99 

North Salem Bank, North 

Salem 316,819 17 

Farmers Bank, Odon 120,174 05 

The Farmers & Merchants 

Bank, Oldenburg 208,330 57 

Bank of Oxford, Oxford 647,951 90 

Citizens Bank, Palmyra 286,414 89 



Patricksburg Bank, Pat- 

ricksburg .^IS.G.ese 99 

Bank of Pence, Pence 266,512 10 

Pennville Bank, Pennville... 218,295 97 
The Perrysville Bank, Perrys- 

ville 145,065 48 

Jackson Township Bank, Per- 
shing 77,101 49 

Bank of Petroleum, Pe- 
troleum 226,562 32 

Peoples Bank, Pierceton 160,767 50 

Bank of Pine Village, Pine 

Village 294,593 67 

Pittsboro Bank, Pittsboro 196,290 34 

Farmers Bank, Plainville 235,703 59 

Bank of Poland, Poland 110,070 63 

Bank of Poneto. Poneto 89,821 80 

Ray Bank, Ray 104,799 82 

Rockfield Bank, Rockfield ... 151,887 30 
Interlaken Bank, Rolling 

Prairie 79,476 32 

The Romney Bank, Romney. 227,957 23 

Bank of Rossville, Rossville. . 377,094 72 

Russellville Bank, Russellville 352,505 02 

Bank of Salem, Salem 723,246 53 

Farmers Bank, Salamonia. . . 39,158 71 

Renner's Bank, Sandborn 60,372 82 

Bank of San Pierre, San 

Pierre 77,430 50 

Amick's Bank, Scipio 67,203 08 

Farmers Bank, Scirclecille. . . 184,540 34 

Bank of Sedalia, Sedalia 177,875 30 

The Bank of Selma, Selma. . . 62,542 06 
The Sharpesville Bank, 

Sharpesville 426,193 98 

Bank of Sidney, Sidney 148,110 90 

Farmers Bank, Silver Lake. . 51,688 44 
The Farmers Bank, South 

Milford 144,819 17 

Citizens Bank, Southport 107,699 46 

Greensfork Township Bank, 

Spartansburg (Crete, R. 

R. 3) 130,476 83 

The Henry County Bank, 

Spiceland 236,019 18 

St. Paul Bank, St. Paul 245,172 71 

Farmers Bank of St. Bernice, 

St. Bernice 152,758 96 

The Peoples Bank, 309, 

Straughn 107,368 27 

E. R. Robard's Bank, Sfiles- 

ville 132,804 42 

Peoples Bank, Sulphur 

Springs 87,614 85 

The Sulphur Springs Bank, 

Sulphur Springs 82,335 47 

Bank of Tocsin, Tocsin 175,347 81 

Union Bank, Union Mills 94,596 80 

Bank of Urbana, Urbana. . . . 44,437 71 

The Wabash Bank, Vincennes 62,198 64 

Citizens Bank, Wakarusa 80,801 61 

Exchange Bank, Wakarusa. . 510,144 06 



100 



Year Book 



Bank of Waldron, Waldron. . $266,526 56 

Farmers Bank, Wallace ■» 94,696 39 

Exchange Bank, Warren 861,822 45 

Citizens Bank, Waterloo 260,661 41 

Farmers & Merchants Bank, 

Waynetovv^n 95,491 60 

Central Bank, West Lebanon 383,782 77 
Farmers Bank, West Lebanon 471,049 22 
Bank of. Westville, Westville 208,075 04 
Bank of Wheatfield, Wheat- 
field 264,909 42 



Farmers & Merchants Bank, 

Wheatland $164,985 18 

Citizens Bank, Whitestown.. 220,596 76 
Farmers Bank of Wyatt, 

Wyatt 87,694 67 

Bank of Yeoman, Yeoman... 173,751 95 
Yorktown Banking Company, 

Yorktown 156,868 48 

Zanesville Bank, Zanesville. . 142,860 97 

Farmers Bank, Zionsville 306,534 00 



Total $41,877,749 64 



SAVINGS BANKS 

Peoples Savings Bank, Evans- Terre Haute Savings Bank, 

ville $5,264,158 52 Terre Haute 2,543,419 09 

Lafayette Savings Bank, St. Joseph County Savings 

Lafayette 2,717,891 40 ' Bank, South Bend 3,355,815 02 

Laporte Savings Bank, La- 

porte 1,919,564 02 Total $15,800,848 05 

MORTGAGE GUARANTEE COMPANY 

American Mortgage Guarantee Co., Indianapolis $1,183,468 38 



RESOURCES OF TRUST COMPANIES OF INDIANA, CALL OF AUGUST 31, 1918 



Commercial Bank & Trust 

Company, Alexandria . $386,707 42 

Peoples Trust Company, 
Alexandria 118,854 16 

Anderson Trust Company, 

Anderson 1,050,500 26 

Farmers Trust Company, 
Anderson 679,947 79 

Madison County Trust Com- 
pany, Anderson 116,931 99 

Angola Bank & Trust Com- 
pany Angola 433,105 40 

First Trust & Savings Com- 
pany, Argos 196,787 90 

Savings Loan & Trust Com- 
pany, Auburn 262,234 51 

The Citizens Trust Company, 

Bedford 412,220 32 

Bieknell Trust & Savings 

Company, Bieknell 262,113 08 



Wayne Trust Company, Cam- 
bridge City $152,809 13 

Peoples Bank & Trust Com- 
pany, Clayton 199,028 71 

Clinton Trust Company, Clin- 
ton 610,446 69 

The Farmers Loan & Trust 

Company, Columbia City. . . 1,054,375 40 

The Provident Trust Com- 
pany, Columbia City 549,834 67 

The Peoples Savings & Trust 

Company, Columbus 870,481 80 

Farmers Trust Company, Co- 
lumbus 519,839 28 

Farmers & Merchants Trust 

Company, Connersville 1,313,946 52 

Farmers Savings & Trust 
Company, Corydon 

The Fountain Trust Compa^ 
ny, Covington 



Bloomfield Trust. Company, 
Bloomfield 263,185 76 The Crawf ordsviUe Trust 



Citizens Loan & Trust Com- 
pany, Bloomington 

Union Savings & Trust Corn- 



Company, Crawf ordsville . 
731,890 01 Farmers & Merchants Trust 
Company, Crawf ordsville. . 



pany, Bluffton 189,678 28 The Danville Trust Company, 



Peoples Trust & Savings 
Bank, Boonville 

The Brazil Trust Company, 
Brazil ^. ..... . 

Davis Trust Company, Brazil 

Peoples Trust Company, 
Brookville 



Danville 

650,554 04 The Peoples Loan & Trust 

Company, Decatur 

883,945 55 Ca;:roll County Loan & Trust 

424,372 72 Company, Delphi 

First Calumet Trust & Sav- 
438,098 32 ings Bank, East Chicago. . 1,435,576 54 



195,581 90 

169,144 18 

530,965 35 

316,727 14 

121,414 07 

383,693 63 

202,612 92 



Auditor of State 



101 



First Trust & Savings Com- 
pany, East Chicago $170,005 39 

Citizens Trust Company, 

Elkhart 925,029 42 

First Trust & Savings Bank, 

Elkhart 338,764 52 

The Elwood Trust Company, 

Elwood 698,528 36 

American Trust & Savings 

Company, Evansville 2,136,771 81 

Citizens Trust & Savings 
Bank, Evansville 901,293 83 

Carroll County Loan, Trust & 

Savings Company, Flora... 403,279 21 

The Citizens Trust Company, 

Fort Wayne 2,486,255 21 

Farmers Trust Company, 

Fort Wayne 373,477 30 

Lincoln Trust Company, Fort \ 

Wayne 1,470,002 27 

The Peoples Trust & Savings 

Company, Fort Wayne 2,468,093 69 

Tri-state Loan & Trust Com- 
pany, Fort Wayne 8,428,962 21 

Citizens Loan & Trust Com- 
pany, Frankfort 403,223 74 

Clinton County Loan & Trust 

Company, Frankfort 1,078,667 64 

Frankfort Loan & Trust 

Company, Frankfort 516,989 16 

Farmers Trust Company, 

Franklin 527,993 22 

The Union Trust Company, 

Franklin 131,126 50 

Garrett Savings Loan & 

Trust Company, Garrett.. 132,318 61 

Gary Trust & Savings Com- 
pany, Gary 495,537 30 

International Trust & Sav- 
ings Company, Gary 273,869 76 

South Side Trust & Savings 

Company. Gary 551,701 60 

Union Trust & Savinjcs Com- 
pany, Gary 138,489 15 

State Trust & Savings Com- 
pany, Goodland 268,445 16 

Elkhart County Trust Com- 
pany, Goshen 1,239,112 51 

The Central Trust Company, 
Greencastle 629,555 73 

The Citizens Trust Company, 
Grecncastle 238,803 05 

The Union Trust Company, 
Greensburg .4 510,068 26 

The Union Trust Company, 
Hagerstown 129,839 83 

American Trust & Savings 

Bank, Hammond 512,410 27 

Hammond Savings & Trust 

Company, Hammond 418,714 58 

Lake County Savings & Trust 

Company, Hammond 1,388,021 09 



Northern Trust & Savings 

Bank, Hammond $176, (!71 65 

American Trust & Savings 

Bank, Hobart 203,372 65 

The Citizens Trust Company, 

Huntingburg 187,213 20 

The Farmers Trust Company, 

Huntington 346,099 73 

The Huntington Trust Com- 
pany, Huntington 718,484 50 

Aetna Trust & Savings Com- 
pany, Indianapolis 2,146,657 89 

Bankers Trust Company, In- 
dianapolis 502,657 61 

City Trust Company, Indian- 
apolis 302,819 49 

Farmers Trust Company, In- 
dianapolis 1,787,061 19 

Fidelity Trust Company, In- 
dianapolis 1,365,367 84 

Fletcher Trust & Savings 

Company, Indianapolis 14,187,318 67 

The Indiana Trust Company, 
Indianapolis 15,334,534 81 

Security Trust Company, In- 
dianapolis 1,666,687 14 

State Savings & Trust Com- 
pany, Indianapolis 2,T71,247 47 

Union Trust Company, In- 
dianapolis 20,414,793 89 

Washington Bank & Trust 

Company, Indianapolis . . . 1,229,180 69 

Citizens Trust & Savings 

Company, Indiana Harbor 474,639 57 

First State Trust & Savings 

Bank, Indiana Harbor 993,586 37 

The Citizens Trust Company, 

Jeffersonville 1,121,753 25 

Kendallville Savings & Trust 

Company, Kendallville ... 135,252 87 

American Trust Company, 

Kokomo 527,299 75 

The Farmers Trust & Sav- 
ings Company, Kokomo 1,198,028 41 

Kokomo Trust Company, Ko- 
komo 1,535,564 24 

Starke County Trust & Sav- 
ings Bank, Knox 471,874 83 

Lafayette Loan & Trust Com- 
pany, Lafayette 2,807,048 94 

Tippecanoe Loan & Trust 
Company, Lafayette 908,688 75 

Lagrange County Trust Com- 
pany, Lagrange 162,466 99 

Laporte Savings & Trust 

Company, Laporte 98,379 98 

Peoples Trust & Savings 

Bank, Laporte 852,377 OS 

Citizens Loan & Trust Com- 
pany, Lebanon 488,470 47 

Farmers & Merchants Trust 

Company, Ligonier 625,903 48 



102 



Year Book 



Linton Trust Company, Lin- 
ton $514,698 44 

The Citizens Loan & Trust 

Company, Logansport 567,104 96 

The Logansport Loan & 
Trust Company, Logans- 
port 1,110,643 38 

Madison Safe Deposit Com- 
pany, Madison 2,142,364 87 

Farmers Trust & Savings 

Company, Marion 1,661,586 31 

Grant Trust & Savings Com- 
pany, Marion 2,210,254 50 

Martinsville Trust Company, 
Martinsville 334,468 08 

Michigan City Trust & Sav- 
ings Company, Michigan 
City 686,436 98 

First Trust & Savings Com- 
pany, Mishawaka 1,380,694 11 

Mishawaka Trust & Savings 

Company, Mishawaka 987,915 46 

North Side Trust & Savings 

Company, Mishawaka 538,330 76 

White County Trust & Sav- 
ings Company, Monticello. 288,080 65 

Peoples Bank & Trust Com- 
pany, Mount Vernon 1,149,997 89 

The Muncie Trust Company, 
Muncie 464,264 58 

Peoples Trust Company, 
Muncie 1,009,308 13 

American . Bank & Trust 

Company, New Albany 1,099,360 24 

Mutual Trust & Deposit 

Company, New Albany ... 906,848 09 

The New Albany Trust Com- 
pany, New Albany 984,994 26 

Central Trust & Savings 

Company, Newcastle 613,467 66 

Noblesville Trust Company, 
Noblesville 106,372 99 

Wainright Trust Company, 

Noblesville 1,289,552 45 

Union Trust Company, North 
Manchester 238,558 65 

Pendleton Trust Company, 

Pendleton ; 223,888 56 

The Peru Trust Company, 

Peru 1,210,460 03 

Wabash Valley Trust Compa- 
ny, Peru 1 ,070,640 63 

The Peoples Loan & Trust 

Company, Petersburg 85,188 13 

Marshall County Trust & 
Savings Company, Ply- 
mouth 294,430 91 

Jay County Trust & Sav- 
ings Company, Portland... 262,623 95 

Citizens Trust & Savings 

Company, Princeton 533,993 02 



The Trust & Savings Com- 
pany, Rensselaer $761,444 57 

Dickinson Trust Company, 

Richmond 3,017,228 83 

American Trust & Savings 

Company, Richmond 613,391 21 

Farmers Trust Company, 

Rising Sun 73,963 82 

Indiana Bank & Trust Com- 
pany, Rochester 772,699 98 

The Brown Trust Company, 

Rockport 751,788 55 

Farmers Trust Company, 
Rushville 190,277 62 

The Peoples Loan & Trust 

Company, Rushville 821,410 03 

Jackson County Loan & Trust 

Company, Seymour . 918,961 84 

Shelbyville Trust Company, 

Shelbyville 594,509 70 

The Security Trust Company, 

Shelbyville 325,359 91 

American Trust Company, 

South Bend ^ 2,901,209 81 

Citizens Loan, Trust & Sav- 
ings Company, South Bend 1,558,089 20 

Farmers Trust Company, 

South Bend 552,466 06 

The St. Joseph Loan & Trust 

Company, South Bend 4,981,359 22 

Union Tinst Company, South 

Bend 1,392,975 19 

Citizens Trust Company, Sul- 
livan 324,356 19 

Sullivan County Loan & 

Trust Company, Sullivan.. 403,734 20 

Summittville Bank & Tmst 

Company, Summittville ... 378,232 19 

Citizens Trust Company, 

Terre Haute 831,187 79 

The Terre Haute Trust Com- 
pany, Terre Haute 6,548,399 67 

United States Trust Compa- 
ny, Terre Haute 4,937,855 89 

Farmers Loan & Trust Com- 
pany, Tipton 802,578 04 

Union Loan & Trust Com- 
pany, Union City 394,252 16 

The First Trust Company, 
Valparaiso 306,274 54 

The Thrift Trust Company, 

Valparaiso 417,021 65 

Farmers Trust Company, Van 

Buren 136,058 24 

The Citizens Trust Company, 

Vincennes 523,478 76 

Knox Bank & Trust Compa- 
ny, Vincennes 500,530 56 

Citizens Savings & Trust 

Company, Wabash 628,547 79 

Wabash County Loan & Trust 

Company, Wabash 857,136 22 



Auditor of State 103 

Indiana Loan & Trust Com- The First Trust & Savings 

pany, Warsaw $1,033,861 66 Bank, Winamac $140,830 19 

The Citizens Loan & Trust Peoples Loan & Trust Com- 

Company, Washington . . . 340,636 76 pany, Winchester 605,982 67 

First Trust & Savings Bank, 



Whiting 232,174 04 $186,231,009 85 

OFFICERS AND EMPLOYES 

OTTO L. KLAUSS, Auditor of State. 

JAMES H. TOMLIN, Chief Clerk of Building and 

Loan Departmnet. 
W. S. HASTINGS, Examiner. 
M. F. DeJARNATT, Examiner. 
HENRY HOCK, Examiner. 

LELA A. YOUNG, Stenographer. 

\ 

PROGRESS OF ASSOCIATIONS 

The fiscal year ending September 30, 1918, has been a trying year on 
building and loan associations. In order to meet the needs of the Gov- 
ernment for funds to carry on the great world war, stockholders have 
drawn heavily upon the funds of associations, but the necessities of the 
Government have been met most liberally and loyally, not only by the 
stockholders, but by the associations themselves. Large sums have been 
invested in Liberty Bonds. But in spite of the heavy drafts made upon 
them, the associations have continued a steady growth and they are now 
stronger than ever before in the way of assets. 

Owing to the high cost of material and the war necessities, building 
has been comparatively light during the year. This delay in the con- 
struction of homes is only temporary and the period following the close 
of the war, will undoubtedly be an era of unprecedented activity and 
prosperity for building and loan associations. 

CREATION AND FUNCTIONS OF THE BUILDING AND LOAN DEPARTMENT 

The law of 1911 created and established in the office of the Auditor 
of State a building and loan association department under the direct 
control and direction of the Auditor of State, who is made ex-officio 
building and loan inspector and is charged with the execution of the laws 
of the State relating to building and loan associations. 

The law of 1911 authorized the Auditor of State to employ a build- 
ing and loan clerk, together with three building and loan examiners. 
This clerk, assisted by the examiners, is charged with the general super- 
vision and examination of the building and loan associations of the State 
under the direction of the State Auditor. The building and loan depart- 
ment has therefore been in operation for about seven years. 

The law of 1911 gave definite purpose and encouragement to the 
entire building and loan business, and while the associations are by no 
means perfect in their operations under the law, yet it must be said that 
they are, withal, in a very prosperous condition, and are to be com- 
mended upon their progress and general good management. 



104 Year Book 

The building and loan department of the State Auditor's office has 
three very clear and distinct functions or duties: 

First, to give all reasonable and legitimate encouragement possible 
to the asfsociations of the State for the furtherance of their business. 

Second, to require all associations to render strict obedience to the 
laws of the State under which they operate. 

Third, to see that associations have no unsound practices or policies. 

The building and loan depsirtment deems these duties to be its highest 
opportunity to serve the interests of the associations and the depart- 
ment proposes to carry out these functions by means of conferences with 
directors and by correspondence and inspections. 

THE FOLLOWING ASSOCIATIONS ARE IN LIQUIDATION 

German Building Loan Fund & Savings Association, Decatur. 

American Building & Loan Association, Marion. 

Hanover Building & Aid Association No. 1, Hanover. 

Hartford Savings & Investment Company, Indianapolis. 

Shoals Savings & Loan Association, Shoals. 

Enterprise Building & Loan Association, Terre Haute. 

West Terre Haute Savings Loan & Building Association, West Terre 
Haute. 

The Wayne International Building & Loan Association, Cambridge 
City. 

Clay County Home & Savings Association, Brazil. 

ASSOCIATIONS INCORPORATED DURING THE YEAR * 

Name of Association and Location. Authorized Capital. 

Market Savings & Loan Association, Indianapolis $200,000 

Francisco Building & Loan Association, Francisco 100,000 

The Gary Building & Loan Association, Gary 1,000,000 

Home Building & Loan Association, Gary 250,000 

Total .- $1,550,000 

INCREASES IN CAPITAL STOCK DURING THE YEAR 

Name of Association and Location. Amount of Increase. 

Crown Point Building & Loan Association, Crown Point $100,000 

Home Savings & Loan Association, Peru 400,000 

Peru Building & Loan Association, Peru 500,000 

Railroadmen's Building & Savings Association, Indianapolis 5,000,000 

Union Savings & Loan Association, Washington 250,000 

Union Savings Association, Terre Haute 1,000,000 

Winslow Building & Loan Association, Winslow 100,000 

Ripley County Building Association, Osgood 50,000 

Home Building & Loan Association, Washington 200,000 

Calumet Building and Loan Association, Hammond 500,000 

Bartholomew Building & Loan Association, Columbus 100,000 

Citizens Building & Loan Association, Frankfort 200,000 

Total $8,400,000 

Three associations closed up their business during the year and there 
were two consolidations. 



Auditor of State 105 

financial statement for fiscal year ending september 30, 1918 

Receipts 

Examination fees $18,786 00 

Expense account 11 74 

Total $13,747 74 

Dishurseynents 

Salaries of chief clerk and three examiners $7,850 00 

Traveling expenses of chief clerk and examiners 3,022 24 

Total $10,872 24 

Gain to the state over salaries and expenses $2,875 50 

Fees collected by secretary of state on account of increases in capital stock 

and oragnization of new associations 1,014 00 

Total gain to the state over salaries and expenses $3,889 50 

\ 

EXAMINATION FEES 
(S. B. 421, Approved March 7, 1917. In Effect May 31, 1917.) 

Associations of less than $25,000 assets $10 00 

Associations of over $25,000 and less than $50,000 assets 15 00 

Associations of over $50,000 and less than $100,000 assets 20 00 

For each additional $100,000 of assets or fractional part* thereof 12 00 

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT SHOWING IN DETAIL THE VARIOUS ITEMS OF 
ASSETS AND LIABILITIES OF ALL THE BUILDING AND LOAN ASSO- 
CIATIONS OF INDIANA AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1917 

Assets 

Cash on hand December 31, 1917 $2,415,500 85 

Loans on mortgage security 68,966,032 95 

Loans on stock or passbook security 1,185,043 96 

Loans on other security 2,4?2,249 09 

Furniture and fixtures 66,338 72 

Real estate— book value 1,678,187 73 

Sheriff's certificates and judgments 45,257 02 

Due for insurance and taxes 31,634 38 

Bonds 1,079,041 90 

Miscellaneous 163,630 80 

Total $78,112,917 40 

Liabilities 

Dues and dividends on running stock $55,808,220 52 

Paid-up and prepaid stocks 12,428,268 9$ 

Deposits and dividends 4,115,214 fl§ 

Matured stock 411,184 11 

Fund for contingent losses 1,640,881 61 

Undivided profits 1,200.£8T li 

Borrowed money I,T67,91I IS 

Due on leans 10,156 8t 

Miscellaneous 204,719 X7 

Dividends unpaid 459,721 82 

Total $78,112,917 40 



106 Year Book 

statistical information for year ending december 31, 1917 

1. Assets of all associations of the state December 31, 1917 $78,112,917 40 

2. Increase in assets of all associations in 1917 over 1916 5,818,661 06 

3. Amount of capital stock subscribed and in force December 31, 1917.. 174,837,520 00 

4. Increase of capital stock subscribed and in force in 1917 over 1916.. 14,059,195 00 

5. Amount of authorized capital stock December 31, 1917 262,195,000 00 

6. Increase in authorized capital stock in 1917 over 1916 20,440,000 00 

7. Mortgage loans in force December 31, 1917 68,966,032 95 

8. Increase in mortgage loans in 1917 over 1916 5,691,399 74 

9. Passbook loans in force December 31, 1917 1,185,043 96 

10. Increase in passbook loans in 1917 over 1916 154,06127 

11. Total expenses of all associations for year ending December 31, 1917.. 547,517 93 

12. Increase in expenses of 1917 over 1916 57,407 54 

13. Average cost of conducting the business of all associations of the 

state based on assets for year 1917, about 7/10 of 1% 

14. Number of homes built through associations in 1917 2,558 

15. Number of homes improved through associations in 1917 2,610 

16. Total number of associations making report December 31, 1917 351 

17. Total nvunber of borrowing members December 31, 1917 69,549 ' 

18. Total number of investing members December 31, 1917 132,860 

19. Total membership December 31, 1917 202,409 

20. Total nvmiber of shares of stock in force December 31, 1917 1,664,862 



Auditor of State 



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Auditor of State 121 

REPORT OF THE INSURANCE DEPARTMENT 

OFFICERS AND EMPLOYES 

OTTO L. KLAUSS, Auditor of State. 
STUART A. COULTER, Insurance Deputy. 
MILES SCHEAFFER, Actuary. 
ARNOLD EPMEIER, Securities Clerk. 
F. A. HEURING, Examiner. 
IVA QUINN, lusurance Clerk. 
DENNIS J. SULLIVAN, License Clerk. 
GRACE M. GOE, Clerk and Stenographer. 
ELMA JORGENSEN, Stenographer. 
\ 

The Auditor of State as ex-officio Insurance Commissioner is charged, 
by the statutes of the State of Indiana, with the duty of admin- 
istering the laws in reference to insurance and insurance companies. 
It is also the further duty of the Auditor of State to furnish insurance 
information to all the citizens of the State, to advise with them concern- 
ing their insurance problems and to assist justly in the settlement of 
controversies between the companies, their agents and the public. 

The insurance laws are enacted for the purpose of protecting the 
public against unethical and improper tactics of unreliable organizations 
and to prevent the formation of such. 

During the year 1917 there have been no remarkable developments in 
the insurance business in the State and the companies, as a rule, have 
been prosperous. 

FEES AND TAXES COLLECTED BY THE INSURANCE DEPARTMENT FOR THE 
FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1918 

Insurance Tax 

American Fire Companies . • • $145,074 14 

Foreign Fire Companies 18,060 34 

Old Line Life Insurance Compamies 403,285 95 

Miscellaneous Companies 97,818 43 

Total $664,238 86 

Insurance Fees 

Fire Companies $44,566 00 

Old Line Life Companies 14,820 00 

Assessment Companies 475 00 

Miscellaneous Companies 11,904 00 

General Fees (all Companies) 13,481 70 

Total $85,246 70 

Reciprocal Tax 

American Fire Companies $19,770 98 

Foreign Fire Companies • 76 08 

Life Insurance Companies 4,688 84 

Miscellaneous Companies 5,692 00 

Total • $30,227 90 



122 Year Book 

Fire Marshal Fund 

American Fire Companies $40,491 79 

Foreign Fire Companies 6,313 67 

Total $46,805 46 

Examination Fees 
Examination fees $18,434 30 

Total Receipts For the Year $844,953 22 

COMPANIES ORGANIZED IN INDIANA, 1918 

(Prior to September 30.) 

Life 
Gary National Life Insurance Company Gary, Ind. 

Fire 
Citizens Mutual Fire Insurance Company. : Richmond, Ind. 

Miscellaneous 
Indiana Liberty Mutual Company .- Indianapolis. 



COMPANIES ADMITTED TO INDIANA, 1918 

(Prior to September 30.) 

Life 

Maryland Assurance Corporation Baltimore, Md. 

The Morris Plan Insurance Society New York, N. Y. 

Protective League Life Insurance Company Decatur, III. 

Kentucky Central Life and Accident Insurance Company .Anchorage, Ky. 

Cleveland Life Insurance Company. Cleveland, Ohio. 

Fire 

Home Fire and Marine Insurance Company of California ....San Francisco. 

Central National Fire Insurance Company Des Moines, la. 

Atlantic Mutual Fire Insurance Company Philadelphia. 

Retail Hardware Mutual Fire Insurance Company , Minneapolis. 

Christiania General Insurance Company, Ltd Christiania, Norway. 

Potomac Insurance Company ^.^ Washington, D. C. 

Capital Fire Insurance Company Sacramento, Cal. 

United British Insurance Company, Ltd London, England. 

Scandinavian- American Assurance Corporation, Ltd Christiania, Norway. 

United States Lloyds, "Inc." New York, N. Y. 

Rocky Mountain Fire Insurance Company Great Falls, Mont. 

Minnesota Implement Mutual Insurance Company Owatonna, Minn. 

Miscellaneous Companies 

National Protective Insurance Company Boston, Mass. 

Great Western Accident Insurance Company Des Moines, la. 

Southern Surety Company of Iowa Des Moines, la. 

Interstate Casualty Company Birmingham, Ala. 

American Bonding and Casualty Company Sioux City, la. 

Western Casualty Company Chicago, 111. 



Auditor of State 



122 



CHANGE OF NAME, 1918 
(Prior to September 30th.) 



Old Name 

Standard Accident Insurance Company, 
Detroit, Mich. 

The Germania Life Insurance Company, 
New York, N. Y. 

New Jersey Fire Insurance Company, 
Newark, N. J. 

Germania Fire Insurance Company, New 
York, N. Y. 

Eagle and British Dominions Insurance 
Company, Ltd., London, England. 

German Alliance Insurance Company, New 
York, N. Y. \ 

German American Insurance Company, 
New York, N. Y. 

German Fire Insurance Company, Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. 

German Fire Insurance Company, Wheel- 
ing, W. Va. 

Teutonia Fire Insurance Company, Day- 
ton, O. 

Tokio Marine Insurance Company, Ltd., 
Tokio, Japan. 

Protective League Life Insurance Com- 
pany, Decatur, 111. 



New Name 

Standard Life and Accident Insurance 
Company, Detroit, Mich. 

The Guardian Life Insurance Company, 
New York, N. Y. 

New Jersey Insurance Company, Newark, 
N. J. 

National Liberty Insurance Company of 
America, New York, N. Y. 

Eagle, Star and British Dominions Insur- 
ance Company, Ltd., London, England. 

American Alliance Insurance Company, 
New York, N. Y. 

Great American Insurance Company, New 
York, N. Y. 

Globe Insurance Company of Pennsylvania, 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Wheeling Fire Insurance Company, Wheel- 
ing, W. Va. 

The Reliable Fire Insurance Company, 
Dayton, O. 

Tokio Marine and Fire Insurance Com- 
pany, Tokio, Japan. 

Standard Life Insurance Company, De- 
catur, 111. 



FOREIGN COMPANIES AUTHORIZED IN FORMER YEARS NOT LICENSED 
(Prior to Sept. 30th.) 



Aachen and Munich Fire Insurance Com- 
pany, Aix-la-Chapelle, Germany. 

Balkan National Fire Insurance Company, 
Bulgaria. 

"Bulgaria" First Bulgarian Insurance Com- 
pany, Bulgaria. 

Frankona Re-Insurance Company, Berlin, 
Germany. 

Hamburg Bremen Fire Insurance Com- 
pany, Hamburg, Germany. 



Mannheim Insurance Company, Mannheim, 
Germany. 

Munich Re-Insurance Company, Bavaria, 
Germany. 

Nord Deutsche Insurance Company, Ham- 
burg, Germany. 

Prussian National Fire Insurance Com- 
pany, Stetten, Germany. 



COMPANIES WITHDRAWN, ETC., 1918 
(Prior to Sept. 30th.) 



Security Mutual Life Insurance Company, 
Binghamton, N. Y. 

Equitable Accident Company, Boston, 
Mass. 

General Indemnity Corporation of America, 
Rochester, N. Y. 

Guardian Casualty and Guaranty Com- 
pany, Salt Lake City. 



Southern Surety Compny, Denison, Okla. 

World Life and Accident Insurance Com- 
pany, Chicago, 111. 

Wayne Health and Accident Insurance 
Company, Ft. Wayne, Ind. 

Farmers and Merchants Mutual Life As- 
sociation, Princeton, Ind. 



124 



Year Book 



INDIANA CORPORATIONS 



Life Companies (Stock and Mutual) 

American Central Life Insurance Company, 
Indianapolis, Ind. 

Central States Life Insurance Company, 
Crawfordsville, Ind. 

Conservative Life Insurance Company, 
South Bend, Ind. 

Crescent Life Insurance . Company, In- 
dianapolis, Ind. 

Century Life Insurance Company, Indian- 
apolis, Ind. 

Indiana National Life Insurance Company, 
Indianapolis, Ind. 

Indianapolis Life Insurance Company, In- 
dianapolis, Ind. 

Intermediate Life Assurance Company, 
Evansville, Ind. 

Lincoln National Life Insurance Company, 
Fort Wayne, Ind. 

Northern States Life Insurance Company, 
Hammond, Ind. 

Peoples Life Insurance Company, Frank- 
fort, Ind. 

Public Savings Insurance Company, In- 
dianapolis, Ind. 

Reserve Loan Life Insurance Company, In- 
dianapolis, Ind. 

Western Reserve Life Insurance Company, 
Muncie, Ind. 

Farmers National Life Insurance Company, 
Executive Offices, Chicago, 111. 

Lafayette Life Insurance Company, La- 
fayette, Ind. 

State Life Insurance Company, Indian- 
apolis, Ind. 

Gary National Life Insurance Company, 
Gary, Ind. (New company, licensed 
February 6, 1918.) 

Assessment Companies (Life and Accident 
and Health) 

American Mutual Life Insurance Com- 
pany, Seymour, Ind. 

American Travelers Association, Indian- 
apolis, Ind. 

Business Mens Indemnity Association, In- 
dianapolis, Ind. 

Church Members Relief Association, In- 
dianapolis, Ind. 

Empire Health and Accident Insurance 
Company, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Federal Savings and Insurance Company, 
Indianapolis, Ind. 

Ft. Wayne Mercantile Accident Associa- 
tion, Ft. Wayne, Ind. 

Home Accident and Health Insurance Com- 
pany, South Bend, Ind. 

Hoosler Casualty Company, Indianapolis, 
Ind. 

Indiana Travelers Accident Association, In- 
dianapolis, Ind. 



Jeffersonville Mutual Protective Insurance 
Company, Jeffersonville, Ind. 

Neighbors Benefit Union, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Police and Firemens Insurance Association, 
Indianapolis, Ind. 

Rex Health and Accident Insurance Com- 
pany, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Standard National Life Insurance Com- 
pany, South Bend, Ind. 

Wayne Health and Accident Insurance 
Company, Ft. Wayne, Ind. 

Star Health and Accident Company, Gary, 
Ind. 

International Business Mens Assurance 
Company, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Fire Companies (Stock and Mutual) 

American Mutual Insurance Company, In- 
dianapolis, Ind. 

Columbian Insurance Company, Indianap- 
olis, Ind. 

Grain Dealers National Mutual Fire In- 
surance Company, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Indiana Mutual Automobile Insurance Com- 
pany, Laporte, Ind. 

Indiana Retail Mcrohants Association Mu- 
tual Fire Insurance Company, Ander- 
son, Ind. 

Indianapolis German Mutual Fire Insur- 
ance Company, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Merchants Fire Insurance Company, In- 
dianapolis, Ind. 

Meridian Mutual Fire Insurance Company, 
Indianapolis, Ind. 

Indiana Lumbermens Mutual Insurance 
Company, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Sterling Fire Insurance Company, Indian- 
apolis, Ind. 

Wabash Fire Insurance Company, Wabash, 
Ind. 

Miscellaneous Companies 

American Liability Company, Executive 
Office, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

Continental Casualty Company, Executive 
Office, Chicago, 111. 

Inter-Ocean Casualty Company, Executive 
Ofiice, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

The Mutual Protective Association, Ft. 
Wayne, Ind. 

Standard Live Stock Insurance Company, 
Indianapolis, Ind. 

Fraternal Societies 

Catholic Benevolent League of Indiana, Ft. 
Wayne, Ind. 

Knights of Pythias "Insurance Dept.," In- 
dianapolis, Ind. 

Supreme Tribe of Ben-Hur, Crawfords- 
ville, Ind. 

Supreme Lodge of the Pilgrim Knights of 
the World, Lafayette, Ind. 



Auditor op State 



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129 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF INSURANCE COMPANIES AUTHORIZED IN INDIANA 



Miscellaneous Companies, "Stock, Mutual 
and Foreign" 

American Bonding and Casualty Company, 

Pierce and Seventh Sts., Sioux City, la. 
Aetna Casualty and Surety Company, 650 

Main St., Hartford, Conn. 
American Automobile Insurance Company, 

Pierce Bldg., St. Louis, Mo. 
American Casualty Company, ' Fifth and 

Penn. Sts., Reading, Pa. 
American Credit Indemnity Company of 
New York, 80 Maiden Lane, New York, 
N. Y. Ex. Office, 415 Locust St., St. 
Louis, Mo. ^ 

American Guaranty Company, 8 E. Long 

St.', Columbus, Ohio. 
American Indemnity Company, 2328 

Strand, Galveston, Texas. 
American Liability Company, Indianapolis, 
Indiana. Second National Bank Bldg., 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
American Mutual Liability Insurance Com- 
pany, 50 State St., Boston, Mass. 
American Old Line Insurance Company, 

Lincoln, Neb. 
American Surety Company of New York, 

100 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 
Autoist Mutual Insurance Company, 208 

S. LaSalle St., Chicago, 111. 
Automobile Liability Company, Limited 

Mutual, Milwaukee, Wis. 
Brotherhood Accident Company, 294 Wash- 
ington St., Boston, Mass. 
Builders and Manufacturers Mutual Casual- 
ty Company, 29 S. LaSalle St., Chicago, 
III. 
Chicago Bonding and Insurance Company, 

29 S. LaSalle St., Chicago, 111. 
Clover Leaf Casualty Company, 306-308 E. 

State St., Jacksonville. 111. 
Commonwealth Casualty Company, 530-39 

Drexel Bldg., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Continental Casualty Company, 910 Mich- 
igan Ave., Chicago, 111. 
Eastern Casualty Company, Copley Square, 

Boston, Mass. 
Employers Indemnity Corporation, 706 

Commerce Bldg., Kansas City, Mo. 
Employers Liability Assurance Corporation, 
Ltd., Kingdom of Great Britain and 
Ireland, U. S. Branch, 33 Broad St., 
Boston, Mass. 
European Accident Insurance Company, 
Ltd., Kingdom of Great Britain, 123 
William St.. New York, N. Y. 
Federal Casualty Company, 533 Majestic 

Bldg., Detroit, Mich. 
Fidelity and Casualty Company of New 
York, 92-94 Liberty St. and 97-103 Cedar 
St., New York, N. Y. 

9— X896e 



Fidelity and Deposit Company of Mary- 
land, corner Charles and Lexington Sta., 
Baltimore, Md. 
General Fire and Life Assurance Corpora- 
tion, Ltd.. Perth, Scotland, U. S. Branch, 
General Bldg., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Georgia Casualty Company, Georgia Cas- 
ualty Bldg., Macon, Ga. 
Globe Indemnity Company, 45 William St., 

New York. N. Y. 
Great Eastern Casualty Company, 55 John 

St., New York, N. Y. 
Great Western Accident Insurance Com- 
pany. Ninth and Walnut St., Des Moines, 
Ta. 
Guarantee Company of North America, 59 

Beaver Hall, Montreal, Canada. 
Hartford Accident and Indemnity Com- 
pany, 125 Trumbull St., Hartford, Conn. 
Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection Insur- 
ance Company, 56 Prospect St., Hart- 
ford, Conn. 
Illinois Mutual Casualty Company. 825-6-7 

Jefferson Bldg., Peoria, 111. 
The Indemnity Company of America, c|o 
Federal Reserve Bank Bldg., St. Louis, 
Mo. 
Indiana Liberty. Mutual Insurance Com- 
pany. 9 Cosmos Bldg., Indianapolis, Ind. 
Inter-Ocean Casualty Company. Indianap- 
olis, Indiana. Ex. Office, 815 Union Cen- 
tral Life Bldg., Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Interstate Casualty Company. Clark Bldg., 

Birmingham. Ala. 
Kansas City Casualty Company, 210 R. A. 

Long Bldg., Kansas City, Mo. 
Kaskaskia Live Stock Insurance Company, 

Shelbyville, 111. 
Lloyds Plate Glass Insurance Company, 63 

William St., New York, N. Y. 
London Guarantee and Accident Company. 
London, England. Ex. Office, 134 S. La- 
Salle St.. Chicago, 111. 
London and Lancashire Indemnity Com- 
pany, 57-59 William St., New York, N. 
Y., (Western Dept.) 39 S. LaSalle St., 
Chicago, 111. 
Loyal Protective Insurance Company, 681 

Boylston St., Boston, Mass. 
Lumbermens Mutual Casualty Company, 
400 Lumber Exchange Bldg., Chicago, 
111. 
Maryland Casualty Company, Maryland 

Casualty Bldg., Baltimore, Md. 
Masonic Protective Association, 18 Frank- 
lin St., Worcester, Mass. 
Massachusetts Accident Company, 161 Dev- 
onshire St., Boston, Mass. 
Massachusetts Bonding Insurance Com- 
pany, 77-85 State St., Boston, Mass. 



130 



Year Book 



Medical Protective Company, 901-24 Shaaflf 
Bldg., Ft. Wayne, Indiana. 

Metropolitan Casualty Insurance Company, 
47 Cedar St., New York, N. Y. 

Midland Casualty Company, Green Bay, 
Wis., Ex. Office, Merchants and Manu- 
facturers Bank Bldg., Milwaukee, Wis. 

Millers Mutual Casualty Company, Insur- 
ance Exchange Bldg., Chicago, III. 

National Casualty Company, 422 Majestic 
Bldg., Detroit, Mich. 

National Protective Insurance Company, 
120 Boylston St., Boston, Mass. 

National Relief Assurance Company, 104 
S. Fourth Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 

National Surety Company, 115 Broadway, 
New York, N. Y. 

New Amsterdam Casualty Company, 59 
John St., New York, N. Y. 

New Jersey Fidelity and Plate Glass Insur- 
ance Company, 271 Market St., Newark, 
N. J. 

New York Plate Glass Insurance Company, 
Maiden Lane and William St., New 
York, N. Y. * 

North American Accident Insurance Com- 
pany, 209 S. LaSalle St., Chicago, 111. 

Norwegian Globe Insurance Company, Ltd., 
Christiania, Norway, U. S. Branch, 80 
Maiden Lane, New York, N. Y. 

Ocean Accident and Guarantee Corpora- 
tion, Ltd., London, England, 59 John St., 
New York, N. Y. 

Peerless Casualty Company, West St., 
Keene, N. H. 

Preferred Accident Insurance Company of 
New York, 80 Maiden Lane, New York. 
N. Y. 

Provident Life and Accident Insurance 
Insurance Company, Chattanooga, Tenn. 

Red Mens Fraternal Accident Association 
of America, 90 Elm St., Westfield, Mass. 

Republic Casualty Company, Pittsburgh, 
Pa. 

Ridgely Protective Association, 518 Main 
St., Worcester, Mass. 

Royal Indemnity Company, 84 William St., 
New York. N. Y. 

Security Mutual Casualty Company, 76 W. 
Monroe St., Chicago, 111. 

Southern Surety Company of Iowa, Des 
Moines, la. 

Standard Life and Accident Insurance 
Company, Penobscot Bldg., Detroit, 
Mich. 

Standard Live Stock Insurance Company, 
551 Lemcke Annex, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Travelers Indemnity Company, 700 Main 
St., Hartford, Conn. 

United States Casualty Company, 80 
Maiden Lane, New York, N. Y. 



United States Fidelity and Guaranty Com- 
pany, U. S. F. and G. Bldg.. Baltimore, 
Md. 

Western Automobile Indemnity Association, 
Ft. Scott, Kan. 

Western Casualty Company. 208 S. LaSalle 
St., Chicago, 111. 

Western Indemnity Company, 1106-20 Com- 
monwealth Bldg., Dallas, Texas. 

Western Live Stock Insurance Company, 
921-27 Jefferson Bldg., Peoria, 111. 

Wisconsin Hardware Limited Mutual Lia- 
bility Insurance Company, 212 Strongs 
Ave., Stevens Point. Wis. 

Zurich General Accident and Liability In- 
surance Company, Ltd., Zurich, Switzer- 
land, 175 Jackson Blvd., Chicago. 111. 

Fire Companies, "Mutual" 

American Mutual Insurance Company, 238 
K. of P. Bldg., Indianapolis. Ind. 

Atlantic Mutual Fire Insurance Company, 
Juniper and Chestnut Sts., Philadelphia. 
Pa. 

The Central Manufacturers Mutual In- 
surance Company, 122-24 W. Main St., 
Van Wert, Ohio. 

Citizens Mutual Fire Insurance Company, 
Richmond, Ind. 

Fitchburg Mutual Fire Insurance Company, 
781 Main St., Fitchburg, Mass. 

Grain Dealers National Mutual Fire In- 
surance Co., 808-11 Board of Trade Bldg., 
Indianapolis. Ind. 

Hardware Dealers Mutual Fire Insurance 
Company, 212 Strongs Ave., Stevens 
Point, Wis. 

Indiana Lumbermens Mutual Insurance 
Company, 518 N. Delaware St., Indian- 
apolis, Ind. 

Indiana Mutual Automobile Insurance Com- 
pany, Laporte, Ind. 

Indiana Retail Merchants Association Fire 
Insurance Company, 1012 Meridian St., 
Anderson, Ind. 

Indianapolis German Mutual Fire Insur- 
ance Company, 308 E. Washington St., 
Indianapolis, Ind. 

Lumber Mutual Fire Insurance Company, 
141 Milk St., Boston, Mass. 

Lumbermens Mutual Insurance Company, 
Lumbermens Heights, Mansfield, Ohio; 

Meridian Mutual Fire Insurance Company, 
Indianapolis, Ind. 

Michigan Millers Mutual Fire Insurance 
Company, 120 W. Ottawa St., Lansing, 
Mich. 

Mill Owners Mutual Fire Insurance Com- 
pany, 413-18 Securities Bldg., Des 
Moines, la. 

Millers Mutual Fire Insurance Association, 
12 W. Third St.. Alton, 111. 



Auditor of State 



l3i 



Millers Mutual Fire Insurance Company. 
111% W. Sixth St., Ft. Worth, Texas. 

Millers National Insurance Company, 175 
W. Jackson Blvd., Chicago, 111. 

National Mutual Fire Insurance Company, 
1241/^ S. Main St., Celina, Ohio. 

Northwestern Mutual Fire Association, 208 
Columbia St., Seattle, Wash. 

Ohio Farmers Insurance Company, Leroy, 
Ohio. 

Ohio Hardware Mutual Insurance Com- 
pany, Coshocton, Ohio. 

Ohio Millers Mutual Fire Insurance Com- 
pany, 206 W. Tuscarawas St., Canton, 
Ohio. 

Ohio Mutual Insurance Company, Salern, 
Ohio. 

Ohio Underwriters Mutual Fire Insurance 
Company, 122-24 W. Main St., Van 
Wert, Ohio. 

Pennsylvania Lumbermens Mutual Fire In- 
surance Company, 806 Lafayette Bldg., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Pennsylvania Millers Mutual Fire Insur- 
ance Company, 500 Coal Exchange Bldg., 
Wilkes Barre, Pa. 

Retail Druggists Mutual Fire Insurance 
Company, 516 Walnut St., Cincinnati, 
Ohio. 

Retail Hardware Mutual Fire Insurance 
Company, Metropolitan Life Bldg., Min- 
neapolis, Minn. 

Union Mutual Insurance Company, 515- 
14 Rentschler Bldg., Hamilton, Ohio. 

Fraternal Companies 

Aid Association for Lutherans, First Na- 
tional Bank Bldg., Appleton, Wis. 

American Insurance Union, 44 Broad St., 
Columbus, Ohio. 

Ancient Order of Gleaners, Woodward and 
Palmer Sts., Detroit, Mich. 

Ancient Order of United Workmen, 9th 
floor, Hubbell Bldg., Des Moines, la. 

Supreme Tribe of Ben-Hur, Main and 
Water Sts., Crawfordsville, Ind. 

Benefit Association of Railway Employees, 
326 W. Madison St., Chicago, 111. 

Brotherhood of American Yeomen, Fifth 
and Park Sts., Des Moines, la. 

Catholic Benevolent League of Indiana, 543 
E. Leith St., Ft. Wayne, Ind. 

Catholic Benevolent Legion, 186 Reinsen 
St., Brooklyn. N. Y. 

Catholic Knights of America, 609 Mercan- 
tile National Bank Bldg., St. Louis, Mo. 

Catholic Ladies of Columbia, 515 S. Mar- 
ket Ave., Canton, Ohio. 

Catholic Order of Foresters, 30 N. LaSalle 
St., Chicago, 111. 

The Columbian Circle, 704 Masonic Temple, 
Chicago, 111. 



Columbian Woodmen (Eminent Household) 
Rhoades Bldg., Atlanta, Ga. 

Concordia Mutual Benefit League, 106 N. 
LaSalle St., Chicago, 111. 

Court of Honor, Springfield, 111. 

Degree of Honor, 580 Shubert Bldg., St. 
Paul, Minn. 

Fraternal Aid Union, corner Eighth and 
Vermont Sts., Lawrence, Kan. 

German Baptists Life Association, 789 El- 
liott St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

German Beneficial Union, 1505-7 Carson 
St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Independent Order of Brith Abraham, 37 
Seventh St., New York, N. Y. 

Independent Order of Foresters, Bay and 
Richmond Sts., Toronto, Canada. 

Independent Order of Vikings, 184 W. 
Washington St., Chicago, 111. 

Independent Western Star Order, 1127 Blue 
Island Ave.. Chicago, 111. 

Junior Order United American Mechanics, 
741-749 Wabash Bldg., Pittsburg, Pa. 

Knights of Columbus, 956 Chapel St, New 
Haven, Conn. 

Knights of Pythias, Insurance Dept., In- 
diana Pythian Bldg., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Knights and Ladies of Security, 701 Kan- 
sas Ave., Topeka, Kas. 

Ladies of The Maccabees, Modern Macca- 
bee Temple, Port Huron, Mich. 

Loyal American Life Association, 1104-1105 
Karpen Bldg., Chicago, 111. 

Lithuanian Alliance of America, Bainett 
Bldg., Wilkes Barre, Pa. 

The Maccabees, Detroit, Mich. 

Masonic Mutual Life Association, New Ma- 
sonic Temple, Washington, D. C. 

Modern American Fraternal Order, Effing- 
ham, 111. 

Modem Brotherhood of America, Mason 
City, la. 

Modern Woodmen of America, 15th St. and 
Third Ave., Rock Island, 111. 

National Benevolent Society, 3101 Troost 
Ave., Kansas City, Mo. 

National Croation Society of United States 
America, 1012 Peralta St., N. S., Pitts- 
burg, Pa. 

National Fraternal Society of the Deaf, 
21 N. LaSalle St., Chicago, 111. 

National Slovak Society of the United 
States America, 524 Fourth Ave., Pitts- 
burg, Pa. 

National Union Assurance Society, 487 
Michigan St., Toledo, Ohio. 

North American Union, 8254 Michigan 
Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Order of Brith Abraham, United States 
Grand Lodge, 266-68 Grand St., New 
York, N. Y. 



132 



Year Book 



Oi'der of Mutual Protection, 159 N. State 

St., Chicago, III. 
Order of United Commercial Travelers, 638 

N. Park St., Columbus, Ohio. 
Pilgrim Knights of the World, 410 Ferry 

St., Lafayette, Ind. 
Platt-edeutsche Grot Gilde of United States 

America, 2046 W. North Ave., Chicago, 

111. 
Polish Alma Mater of the United States of 

North America, 1455 W. Division St., 

Chicago, 111. 
Polish Federation of America, Milwaukee, 

Wis. 
Polish National Alliance of United States 

of North America, 1406-8 W. Division 

St., Chicago, 111. 
Polish-Roman Catholic Union of America, 

984 Milwaukee Ave., Chicago, 111. 
Protected Home Circle, Sharon, Pa. 
Railwaymens Relief Association of Amer- 
ica, 3-5-7 Montgomery Bldg., Muskegon, 

Mich. 
Royal Arcanum, 407-9 Shawmut Ave., 

Boston, Mass. 
Royal League, 1601 Masonic Temple. Chi- 
cago, 111. 
Royal Neighbors of America, Rock Island, 

111. 
South Slavonic Catholic Union, Ely, Minn. 
Switchmen's Union of North America, 326 

Brisbane Bldg., Buffalo, N. Y. 
Travelers Protective Association, 915 Olive 

St., St. Louis, Mo. 
United Order of Foresters, 106 Mason St., 

Milwaukee, Wis. 
United Order of Golden Cross of the 

World, Knoxville, Tenn. 
Womans Benefit Association of the Mac- 
cabees, Maccabee Temple, Port Huron, 

Mich. 
Women's Catholic Order of Foresters, 127 

N. Dearborn St., Chicago, 111. 
Woodmen Circle, 14th and Farnam Sts., 

Omaha, Neb. 
Woodmen of the World, 14th and Far- 
nam Sts., Omaha, Neb. 

Assessment Companies 

American Mutual Life Insurance Com- 
pany, 2nd and Chestnut Sts., Seymour, 
Ind. 

American Travelers Association, 517 Mer- 
chants Bank Bldg., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Bankers Mutual Life Company, N. Galena 
Ave. and Exchange St., Freeport, 111. 

Business Men's Accident Association of 
America, Keith & Perry Bldg., Kansas 
City, Mo. 

Business Men's Indemnity Association, 835 
Lemcke Bldg., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Central Business Men's Association, 1100 
Westminster Bldg., Chicago, 111. 



Church Members Relief Association, 1001 
W. 33rd St., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Detroit Casualty Company, 533 Majestic 

Bldg-., Detroit, Mich. 
Empire Health and Accident Insurance 
Company, 308-13 Majestic Bldg., Indian- 
apolis, Ind. 

Federal Savings and Insurance Company, 
Kahn Bldg., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Fidelity Health and Accident Company, 
Hinckley Block, Benton Harbor, Mich. 

Ft. Wayne Mercantile Accident Company, 
913-15 Calhoun St.. Ft. Wayne, Ind. 

Fraternal Protective Association, 12-20 
Pemberton Square, Boston, Mass. 

Guarantee Fund Life Association, Brandeis 
Bldg., Omaha, Neb. 

Home Accident and Health Insurance Com- 
pany, 315 Dean Bldg., South Bend, Ind. 

Hoosier Casualty Company, Fletcher Trust 
Bldg., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Illinois Bankers Life Association, W. First 
Ave., Monmouth, 111. 

Income Guaranty Company, Niles, Mich., 
Ex. Office, South Bend, Ind. 

Indiana Travelers Accident Association, 725 
State Life Bldg., Indianapolis, Ind. 

International Business Men's Assurance 
Company, Indianapolis, Ind. 

Inter-State Business Men's Accident Asso- 
ciation, Fourth and Chestnut Sts., Des 
Moines, la. 

Jeffersonville Mutual Protective Insurance 
Company, 441 Spring St., Jeffersonville, 
Ind. 

Masonic Mutual Accident Company, 121 
State St., Springfield, Mass. 

Merchants Reserve Life Insurance Com- 
pany, 5 N. LaSalle St., Chicago, 111. 

National Accident Society, 820 Broadway, 
New York, N. Y. 

National Life Association, 10th floor, S. & 
L. Bldg., Des Moines, la. 

Neighbors Benefit Union, State Life Bldg., 
Indianapolis, Ind. 

Peoples Health and Accident Insurance 
Company, New Aldrich Block, Grand 
Rapids, Mich. 

Police and Firemen's Insurance Associa- 
tion, 805 Law Bldg., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Rex Health and Accident Insurance Com- 
pany, 634 Lemcke Bldg., Indianapolis, 
Ind. 

Standard National Life Insurance Com- 
pany, 113 S. Lafayette St., South Bend, 
Ind. 

Star Health and Accident Company, Gary, 
Ind. 

Western Life Indemnity Company, 159 
State St., Chicago, 111. 

Woodmen Accident Company, 13th and N 
Sts., Lincoln, Neb. 



Auditor of State 



Fire Companies, "Stock" 
Aetna Insurance Company, Hartford, 

Conn. 
Agricultural Insurance Company, 203 

Washington St., Watertown, N. Y. 
Allemania Fire Insurance Company, 316 

Fourth Ave., Pittsburg, Pa. 
Alliance Insurance Company, 232 Walnut 
St., Philadelphia, Pa. (Western Dept.) 
76 W. Monroe St., Chicago, 111. 
American Alliance Insurance Company, 1 
Liberty St., New York, N. Y. (Western 
Dept.) ,76 W. Monroe St., Chicago, 111. 
American Insurance Company, 70 Park 
Place, Newark, N. J. (Western Dept.) 
Rockford, III. \ 

American National Fire Insurance Com- 
pany, Columbus, Ohio. 
American Central Insurance Company, 816 

Olive St., St. bonis. Mo. 
American Eagle Fire Insurance Company, 
80 Maiden Lane, New York, N. Y. 
(Western Dept.) 137 S. LaSalle St., Chi- 
cago, III. 
American Druggists Fire Insurance Com- 
pany, 1215 Mercantile Library Bldg., 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Arizona Fire Insurance Company, Noll 

Bldg., Phoenix, Ariz. 
Associated Industries Fire Insurance Com- 
pany, 226 S. LaSalle St., Chicago, 111. 
Automobile Insurance Company, 650 Main 

St., Hartford, Conn. 
Boston Fire Insurance Company, 87 Kilby 

St., Boston, Masa. 
Buffalo Insurance Company, 447-449 Main 

St., Buffalo, N. Y. 
Camden Fire Insurance Company, 434 

Federal St., Camden, N. J. 
Capital Fire Insurance Company, 7th and 

J Sts., Sacramento, Cal. 
Central National Fire Insurance Company, 

402-16 Clapp Bldg., Des Moines, la. 
Citizens Insurance Company, Pierce Bldg., 

St. Louis, Mo. 
City of New York Insurance Company, 
Maiden Lane and William St., New 
York, N. Y. 
Cleveland National Fire Insurance Com- 
pany, 1108 Illuminating Bldg., Cleveland, 
Ohio. 
Columbia Insurance Company, 2nd and 

Jefferson Sts., Dayton, Ohio. 
Columbia Insurance Company, 15 Exchange 
Place, Jersey City, N. J. Ex. Office, 37 
Wall St., New York, N. Y. 
Columbian Insurance Company, 430 N. 

Penn. St., Indianapolis, Ind. 
Columbian National Fire Insurance Com- 
pany, 201 Madison Theatre Bldg., De- 
troit, Mich. 



Commerce Insurance Company, 57 State 

St., Albany, N. Y. 
Commercial Union Fire Insurance Com- 
pany, 55 John St., New York, N. Y. 
Commonwealth Insurance Co., The, 76 Wil- 
liam St.. New York, N. Y. 
Concordia Fire Insurance Co., W. Water 

and Wells Sts., Milwaukee, Wis. 
Connecticut Fire Insurance Co., 51 Pros- 
pect St., Hartford, Conn. 

Continental Insurance Company, 80 Maiden 

Lane, New York, N. Y. 
County Fire Insurance Co., 110 S. 4th St.. 
Philadelphia, Pa. Ex. Office, Manchester, 
N. H. 

Detroit Fire and Marine Insurance Com- 
pany, 95 Shelby St., Detroit, Mich. 

Detroit National Fire Insurance Company, 
11-13 Lafayette Blvd., Detroit, Mich. 

Dubuque Fire and Marine Insurance Com- 
pany, Bank and Insurance Bldg., Du- 
buque, la. 

Equitable Fire and Marine Insurance Com- 
pany, 1 Custom House St., Providence, 
R. I. 

Farmerg Fire Insurance Company, 53 E. 
Market St., York, Pa. 

Federal Insurance Co., 15-17 Exchange 
Place, Jersey City, N. J. 

Fidelity-Phenix Fire Insurance Company 
of New York, 80 Maiden Lane, New 
York, N. Y. 

Fire Association of Philadelphia, Fourth 
and Walnut Sts., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Firemen's Fund Insurance Company, Cali- 
fornia and Sansome Sts., San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

Firemen's Insurance Company, 780 Broad 
St., Newark, N. J. 

Franklin Fire Insurance Company, 421 
Walnut St., Philadelphia. Pa. Ex. Office. 
56 Cedar St., New York, N. Y. 

German Fire Insurance Company, 113-115 
Jefferson St., Peoria, 111. 

Girard Fire and Marine Insurance Com- 
pany, Chestnut and Seventh St., Phila- 
delphia. Pa. 

Glens Falls Insurance Company, 191 Glen 
St., Glens Falls, N. Y. 

Globe Insurance Company of Pennsylvania, 
216-18 Fourth Ave.. Pittsburg, Pa. 

Globe and Rutgers Fire Insurance Com- 
pany, 111 William St., New York, N. Y. 

Granite State Fire Insurance Company, 46- 
50 Congress St.. Portsmouth, N. H. 

Great American Insurance Co., 1 Liberty 
St., New York, N. Y. Western Dept., 
76 W. Monroe St., Chicago, 111. 

Hanover Fire Insurance Company, 34-36 
Pine St., New York, N. Y. Western 
Dspt., Insurrnce Exchange, Chicago, 111. 



134 



Year Book 



Hartford Fire Insurance Company, 125 
Trumbull St., Hartford, Conn. 

Henry Clay Fire Insurance Company, Fay- 
ette National Bank Bldg., Lexington, 
Ky. 

Home Fire and Marine Insurance Company 
of California, San Francisco, Cal. (Cen- 
tral Dept.) 39 S. LaSalle St., Chicago, 
111. 

Home Insurance Company, 56 Cedar St., 
New York, N. Y. 

Humboldt Fire Insurance Company, 1310 
Beaver Ave., Pittsburg, Pa. 

Imperial Assurance Company, 100 William 
St., New York, N. Y. 

Insurance Company of North America, 232 
Walnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Insurance Company of the State of Penn- 
sylvania, 308-10 Walnut St., Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

Inter-State Fire Insurance Company, 141 
Griswold St., Detroit, Mich. 

Marquette National Fire Insurance Com- 
pany, 1821 Insurance Exchange, Chicago, 
111. 

Maryland Motor Car Insurance Company, 
Garrett Bldg., Baltimore, Md. . 

Massachusetts Fire and Marine Insurance 
Company, 95 Water St. and 65 Kilby 
St., Boston, Mass. 

Mechanics Insurance Company, 500-502 
Walnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Mechanics and Traders Insurance Co., New 
Orleans, La. 

Mercantile Insurance Company of Amer- 
ica, 76 William St., New York, N. Y. 

Merchants Fire Assurance Corporation of 
New York, 2 Liberty St., New York, 
N. Y. 

Merchants Fire Insurance Company, 804 
Merchants Bank Bldg., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Merchants National Fire Insurance Com- 
pany, 29 S. LaSalle St., Chicago, III. 

Michigan Commercial Insurance Company, 
116 W. Ottawa St., Lansing, Mich. 

Michigan Fire and Marine Insurance Com- 
pany, Penobscot Bldg., Detroit, Mich. 

Milwaukee Mechanics Insurance Company, 
First National Bank Bldg., Milwaukee, 
Wis. 

National Ben Franklin Fire Insurance 
Company, 120-122 W. Ohio St., N. S. 
Pittsburg, Pa. 

National Fire Insurance Company, 95 
Pearl St., Hartford, Conn. 

National Liberty Insurance Company of 
America, 62 William St., New York, N. 
Y. (Western Dept.) 160 W. Jackson 
Blvd., Chicago, 111. 

National Trades Fire Insurance Company, 
332 Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 



National Union Fire Insurance Company, 
Oliver Bldg., Pittsburg, Pa. 

Newark Fire Insurance Company, 41 Clin- 
ton St., Newark, N. J. (Western Dept.) 
160 W. Jackson Blvd., Chicago, 111. 

New Brunswick Fire Insurance Company, 
40 Patterson St., New Brunswick, N. J. 
(Western Dept.) Insurance Exchange, 
Chicago, 111. 

New Hampshire Fire Insurance Company, 
876 Elm St., Manchester, N. H. 

New Jersey Insurance Cortipany, 40 Clin- 
ton St., Newark, N. J. 

Niagara Fire Insurance Company, 25 
Liberty St., New York, N. Y. 

North River Insurance Company, 95 Wil- 
liam St., New York, N. Y. 

Northern Fire Insurance Company, 1 Lib- 
erty St., New York, N. Y. 

Northwestern National Insurance Com- 
pany, Wisconsin and Jackson Sts., Mil- 
waukee, Wis. ' 

Old Colony Insuralnse Company, 87 Kilby 
St., Boston, Mass. Ex. Office, Lansing, 
Mich. 

Orient Insurance Company, 20 Trinity St., 
Hartford, Conn. 

Pacific Fire Insurance Co., Ill William 
St., New York, N. Y. 

Pennsylvania Fire Insurance Company, 510 
Walnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. Western 
Dept., 175 W. Jackson Blvd., Chicago, 
111. 

Peoples National Fire Insurance Company, 
Third and Walnut Sts., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Phoenix Insurance Company, 35 Pearl St., 
Hartford, Conn. 

Potomac Insurance Company, Washington, 
D. C. 

Providence-Washington Insurance Com- 
pany, 20 Market Square, Providence, R. 
I. 

Queen Insurance Company of America, 84 
William St., New York, N. Y. (West- 
ern Dept.) 160 W. Jackson Blvd., Chi- 
cago, 111. 

The Reliable Fire Insurance Co., 44-46 S. 
Jefferson St., Dayton, Ohio. 

Reliance Insurance Company, 429 Walnut 
St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Rhode Island Insurance Company, 17 Cus- 
tom House St., Providence, R. I. 

Rocky Mountain Fire Insurance Company, 
601 Central Ave., Great Falls, Mont. 

Safeguard Fire Insurance Company, 57-59 
William St., New York, N. Y., Ex. Office, 
20-22 Trinity St., Hartford, Conn. 

Security Fire Insurance Company, 217 W. 
Fourth St., Davenport, la. 

Security Insurance Company, 49 Elm St., 
New Haven, Conn. 



Auditor of State 



135 



standard Fire Insurance Company, 18 

Asyliim St., Hartford, Conn. 
Standard Fire Insurance Company, 15 N. 

State St., Trenton, N. J. 
Sterling Fire Insurance Company, 115 N. 

Penn. St., Indianapolis, Ind. 
Springfield Fire and Marine Insurance 

Co., 195 State St., Springfield, Mass. 
St. Paul Fire and Marine Insurance Com- 
pany, Fifth and Washing-ton Sts., St. 

Paul, Minn. 
Subscribers at United States Lloyds, 3 

S. William St., New York, N. Y. 
Teutonia Fire Insurance Company, 735 E. 

Ohio St., N. S. Pittsburg, Pa. ^ 

United States Fire Insurance Company, 95 

William St., New York, N. Y. 
United States Lloyds, Inc., 3 S. William 

St., New York, N. Y. 
Vulcan Insurance Co., 89 Fulton St., New 

York. N. Y. 
Wabash Fire Insurance Company, Wabash, 

Ind. 
Westchester Fire Insurance Company, 100 

William St., New York, N. Y. 
Wheeling Fire Insurance Company, 1219 

Chapline St., Wheeling, W. Va. 

Fire Companies, "Foreign" 

Atlas Assurance Company, Ltd., London, 
England, U. S. Branch, 100 William St., 
New York City, N. Y. 

British America Assurance Company, 18-22 
E. Front St., Toronto, Canada. 

Caledonian Insurance Company, Kingdom 
of Great Britain g,nd Ireland, U. S. 
Branch, 50-52 Pine St., New York, N. Y. 

Christiania General Insurance Company, 
Ltd., Christiania, Norway, U. S. Branch, 
100 William St., New York, N. Y. 

Commercial Union Assurance Company, 
Ltd., London, England, U. S. Branch, 
55 John St., New York, N. Y. 

Eagle, Star and British Dominions Insur- 
ance Company, London, England, U. S. 
Branch, 123 S. William St., New York, 
N. Y. 

Fire Re-Assurance Company, Republic of 
France, U. S. Branch, Farmington Ave. 
and Broad St., Hartford, Conn. 

General Fire Assurance Company, Paris, 
France, U. S. Branch, 123 William St., 
New York, N. Y. 

Indemnity Mutual Marine Assurance Com- 
pany, Ltd., London, England, U. S. 
Branch, 3 S. William St., New York, 
N. Y. 

Jakor Insurance Company, Moscow, Rus- 
sia, U. S. Branch, 80 Maiden Lane, 
New York, N. Y. 

Law Union and Rock Insurance Company, 
London, England, U. S. Branch, 49 John 
St., New York, N. Y, 



Liverpool and London and Globe Insurance 
Company, Ltd., Great Britain, U. S. 
Branch, 80 William St., New York, N. 
Y. 

London Assurance Corporation, Kingdom 
of Great Britain, U. S. Branch, 84 Wil- 
liam St., New York, N. Y. 

London and Lancashire Fire Insurance 
Company, Liverpool, England. U. S. 
Branch, 55-57 William St., New York. 
N. Y. 

National Fire Insurance Company, Repub- 
lic of France, U. S. Branch, 17 Custom 
House St., Providence, R. I. 

Netherlands Fire and Life Insurance Com- 
pany, The Hague, Holland, U. S. Branch, 
175 W. Jackson Blvd., Chicago, 111. 

Norske Lloyd Insurance Company, Chris- 
tiania, Norway, U. S. Branch, 3 S. Wil- 
liam St., New York, N. Y. 

North British and Mercantile Fire Insur- 
ance Company, London and Edinburg, 
Great Britain, U. S. Branch, 76 William 
St., New York, N. Y. 

Northern Assurance Company, Ltd., Lon- 
don, England, U. S. Branch, 55 John St., 
New York, N. Y. 

Norwegian Assurance Union, Ltd., The, 
Christiania, Norway, U. S. Branch, 3 S. 
William St., New York, N. Y. 

Norwich Union Fire Insurance Society, 
Ltd., Norwich, England, U. S. Branch, 
59 John St., New York, N. Y. 

Palatine Insurance Co., Ltd., London, 
England, U. S. Branch, 55 John St., 
New York, N. Y. 

Patriotic Assurance Company, Ltd., The, 
Dublin, Ireland, U. S. Branch, 54 Pine 
St., New York, N. Y. Western Dept., 
76 W. Monroe St., Chicago, 111. 

Phenix Fire Insurance Company, Republic 
of France, U. S. Branch, 17 Custom 
House St., Providence, R. I. 

Phoenix Assurance Company, Ltd., Lon- 
don, 100 William St., New York, N. Y. 

Rossia Insurance Company, Petrograd, 
Russia, U. S. Branch, 1565 Broad St, 
Hartford, Conn. 

Royal Exchange Assurance Company, 
Kingdom of Great Britain, U. S. 
Branch, 92 William St., New York, N. 
Y. 

Royal Insurance Company, Ltd., Kingdom 
of Great Britain, U. S. Branch, 84 Wil- 
liam St., New York, (Western Dept.) 
160 W. Jackson Blvd., Chicago, 111. 

Scandinavian American Assurance Cor- 
poration, Ltd., Christiania, Norway, 37- 
43 Wall St., New York, N. Y. 

Scottish Union and National Insurance 
Company, Edinburg, Scotland. U. S. 
Branch, 75 Elm St., Hartford, Conn, 



136 



Year Book 



state Assurance Company, Ltd., Kingdom 
of Great Britain. U. S. Branch, 75 Elm 
St., Hartford, Conn. 

Sun Insurance Office, London, England. 
U. S. Branch, 54 Pine St., New York, 
N. Y. Western Department, 76 W. Mon- 
roe St., Chicago, 111. 

Svea Fire and Life Insurance Company, 
Gothenberg, Sweden. U. S. Branch, 100 
William St., New York, N. Y. 

Swiss National Insurance Company, Basle, 
Switzerland. U. S. Branch, 80 Maiden 
Lane, New York, N. Y. 

The Tokio Marine and Fire Insurance 
Company, Ltd., Tokio, Japan. U. S. 
Branch, 3 So. William St., New York, 
N. Y. 

Union Assurance Society, Ltd., London, 
England. U. S. Branch, 55 John St., 
New York. N. Y. 

Union Fire Insurance Company, Paris, 
France. U. S. Branch, 17 Custom House 
St., Providence, R. I. 

Union Marine Insurance Company, Ltd., 
Liverpool, England. U. S. Branch, 27 
William St.. New York, N. Y. 

United British Insurance Company, Ltd., 
London, England, 40 Clinton St., New- 
ark, N. J. 

Urbane Fire Insurance Company, Paris, 
France. U. S. Branch. 123 William St., 
New York, N. Y. 

Western Assurance Company, 22 Welling- 
ton St., Toronto, Canada. 

Life Companies, "Stock" 
Aetna Life Insurance Company, 650 Main 

St., Hartford, Conn. 
American Bankers Insurance Company, 

43 East Ohio St., Chicago, 111. 
American Central Life Insurance Com- 
pany. American Central Life Building, 

Indianapolis, Ind. 
Bankers Reserve Life Company. Omaha, 

Neb". 
Central Life Assurance Society, 7th and 

Grand Ave., Des Moines, la. 
Central States Life Insurance Company, 

202-212 Ben-Hur Building, Crawfords- 

ville, Ind. 
Century Life Insurance Company, Law 

Building, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Columbia Life Insurance Company, Fourth 

and Elm Sts., Cincinnati, O. 
Conservative Life Insurance Company, 117 

So. Lafayette St., South Bend, Ind. 
Continental Assurance Company, 910 Mich- 
igan Ave., Chicago, 111. 
Crescent Life Insurance Co., 1506 Fletcher 

Trust Bldg., Indianapolis, Ind. 
Equitable Life Assurance Society, 165 

Broadway, New York, N. Y, 



Equitable Life Insurance Company, Sixth 
and Locust Sts., Des Moines, la. 

Farmers National Life, Insurance Com- 
pany, Huntington, Ind. Ex. Offices, 3401 
So. Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Federal Life Insurance Company, 166-68 
Michigan Blvd., Chicago, 111. 

Gary National Life Insurance Company, 
Gary Theater Building, Gary, Ind. 

The Guardian Life Insurance Company, 50 
Union Square, New York, N. Y. 

Indiana National Life Insurance Company, 
316 North Meridian St., Indianapolis, 
Ind. 

Intermediate Life Assurance Company, In- 
termediate Life Building, Evansville, 
Ind. 

International Life Insurance Company, In- 
ternational Life Building, St. Louis, 
Mo. 

Inter-Southern Life Insurance Company, 
Fifth and Jefferson Sts., Louisville, Ky. 

Kentucky Central Life and Accident In- 
surance Company, Anchorage, Ky. 

Life Insurance Company of Virginia, Cap- 
itol and Tenth Sts., Richmond, Va. 

Lincoln National Life Insurance Company, 
219 E. Berry St., Ft. Wayne, Ind. 

Manhattan Life Insurance Company, 64-70 
Broadway, New York, N. .Y. 

Marquette Life Insurance Company, Ridge- 
ly Bank Bldg., Springfield, 111. 

Maryland Assurance Corporation, Mary- 
land Casualty Building, Baltimore, Md. 

Merchants Life Insurance Company, Na- 
tional State Bank Building, Des Moines, 
la. 

Michigan Mutual Life Insurance Company, 
150 Jefferson Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

Missouri State Life Insurance Company, 
Chemical Building, St. Louis, Mo. 

The Morris Plan Insurance Society of N. 
Y., 52 William St., New York, N. Y. 

National Life Insurance Company of U. 
S. A., 29 So. LaSalle St., Chicago, III. 

National Life and Accident Insurance 
Company, 302 Seventh Ave., N., Nash- 
ville, Tenn. 

North American Life Insurance Company, 
36 S. State St., Chicago, III. 

Northern Assurance Company of Michi- 
gan, 306-11 Dime Bank Bldg., Detroit, 
Mich. 

Noithern States Life Insurance Company, 
Citizens German National Bank Bldg., 
Hammond, Ind. 

Ohio State Life Insurance Company, 33 
N. High St., Columbus, O. 

The Pacific Mutual Life Insurance Com- • 
pany, 6th and Olive Sts., Los Angeles, 
Cal. 



Auditor of State 



137 



Pan-American Life Insurance Company, 
New Orleans, La., Meridian Branch, 307 
N. Pennsylvania St., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Peninsular-Guardian Life and Accident In- 
surance Company, 627-31 Majestic Bldg., 
Detroit, Mich. 

Peoples Life Insurance Company, 324 W. 
Madison St., Chicago, 111. 

Peoples Life Insurance Company, Ameri- 
can National Bank Bldg., Frankfort, 
Ind. 

Philadelphia Life Insurance Company, 111 
N. Broad St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Protective League Life Insurance Com- 
pany, 364 W. William St., Decatur, 111. 

Provident Life and Trust Company, Fourth 
and Chestnut Sts., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Prudential Insurance Company of Amer- 
ica, 755-69 Byroad St., Newark, N. J. 

Prussian Life Insurance Company, Berlin, 
Germany, Farmington Ave. and Broad 
St., Hartford, Conn. 

Public Savings Insurance Company, 147 E. 
Market St., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Reliance Life Insurance Company, Fifth 
Ave. and Wood St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Reserve Loan Life Insurance Company, 
429 North Pennsylvania St., Indianap- 
olis, Ind. 

Rockford Life Insurance Company, Trust 
Bldg., Rockford, III. 

Scranton Life Insurance Company, 131-33 
Washington Ave., Scranton, Pa. 

Security Life Insurance Company, Rookery 
Bldg., Chicago, 111. 

Union Central Life Insurance Company, 
1-7 W. Fourth St., Cincinnati, O. 

United States Life Insurance Company, 
273-277 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

Western Reserve Life Insurance Company, 
514 Wysor Block. Muncie, Ind. 

Western and Southern Life Insurance Com- 
pany, Fourth and Broadway, Cincinnati, 
O. 

Wisconsin National Life Insurance Com- 
pany, 14-16 Washington St., Oshkosh, 
Wis. 



Life Companies, "Mutual" 

Bankers Life Company, Sixth and Locust 
Sts., Des Moines, la. 

Berkshire Life Insurance Compauy, corner 
North and West Sts., Pittsfield, Mass. 

Connecticut Mutual Life Insurance Com- 
pany, 36 Pearl St., Hartford, Conn. 

The Fidelity Mutual Life Insurance Com- 
pany, 112-116 N. Broad St., Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

Home Life Insurance Company, 256 Broad- 
way, New York, N. Y. 

Indianapolis Life Insurance Company, 302- 
312 Board of Trade, Indianapolis, Ind. 

.Tohn Hancock Mutual Life Insurance Com- 
pany, 178 Devonshire St., Boston, Mass. 

Lafayette Life Insurance Company, 603 
Main St., Lafayette, Ind. 

Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Com- 
pany, 500 Main St., Springfield, Mass. 

Metropolitan Life Insurance Company, No. 
1 Madison Ave., New York, N. Y. 

Mutual Benefit Life Insurance Company, 
750 Broad St., Newark, N. J. 

Mutual Life Insurance Company of New 
York, 32 Nassau St., New York, N. Y. 

National Life Insurance Company, 116 
State St., Montpelier, Vt. 

New England Mutual Life Insurance Com- 
pany, 87 Milk St., Boston, Mass. 

New /ork Life Insurance Company, 346 
Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

Northwestern Mutual Life Insurance Com- 
pany, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Penn Mutual Life Insurance Company, 921- 
925 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Phoenix Mutual Life Insurance Company, 
49 Pearl St., Hartford, Conn. 

State Life Insurance Company, State Life 
Bldg., Indianapolis, Ind. 

State Mutual Life Assurance Company, 340 
Main St., Worcester, Mass. 

Travelers Insurance Company, 700 Main 
St., Hartford, Conn. 

Union Mutual Life Insurance Company, 
396 Congress St., Portland, Me. 



STATEMENT SHOWING THE AMOUNT OF PREMIUMS COLLECTED AND THE 
AMOUNT OF LOSSES PAID IN INDIANA FOR YEAR 1917 

Life Companies, "Stock and Mutual" 

Net Premiums Losses 

Collected Paid 

Indiana Companies $4,071,106 62 $712,907 08 

Foreign Companies 17,791,035 82 6,439,459 91 

Total $21,862,142 44 $7,152,366 99 



138 Year Book 

Fir0 Companies, "Stock, Mutual and Foreign" 

Indiana Companies $312,280 14 $1 10,147 67 

Foreign Companies 10,193,457 68 4,885,581 99 



Total ; $10,505,737 82 $4,995,729 66 

Miscellaneous Companies, "Stock and Mutual" 

Indiana Companies $259,782 85 $93,968 89 

Foreign Companies 4,646,334 69 1,775,897 18 



Total $4,906,117 54 . $1,869,866 07 

Assessment Companies and Associations 

Indiana Companies $737,362 03 $329,056 20 

Foreign Companies 445,120 84 258,078 04 



Total $1,182,482 87 $587,134 24 

-^ 

Fraternal Societies 

Indiana Societies $473,257 04 $341,960 36 

Foreign Societies 2,317,251 83 1,817,618 12 



Total $2,790,508 87 $2,159,578 48 

RECAPITULATION 

Premiums Losses 

Received Paid 

Life Companies. "Stock and Mutual" $21,862,142 44 $7,152,366 99 

Fire Companies, "Stock, Mutual and Foreign" 10,505,737 82 4,995,729 66 

Miscellaneous Companies, "Stock and Mutual" 4,906,117 54 1,869,866 07 

Assessment Companies and Associations 1,182,482 87 587,134 24 

Fraternal Societies 2,790,508 87 2,159,578 48 



Grand total $41,246,989 54 $16,764,675 44 



REPORT OF STATE BOARD OF TAX COMMISSIONERvS 



MEMBERS OF BOARD 

WILLIAM A. ROACH, Chairman, Ex-Officio. 
OTTO L. KLAUSS, E^^-Officio. 
STRANGE N. CRAGUN, Appointive Member. 
FRED A. SIMS, Appointive Member. 
PHILIP ZOERCHER, Appointive Member. 

HISTORY 

The Federal Constitution guarantees to the several States of the 
Union the management of their own domestic affairs, one of which is to 
provide for revenue to meet the needs of local government. 

The Constitution of the State of Indiana, in Section 193 of Article 
10 reads as follows : 

"The General Assembly shall provide, by law, for a uniform 
and equal rate of assessment and taxation; and shall prescribe 
such regulations as shall secure a just valuation for taxation of 
al] property, both real and personal, excepting such only, for 
municipal, educational, literary, scientific, religious or charitable 
purposes, as may be especially exempted by law." 

The General Assembly of the State in 1852, the year following the 
adoption of the Constitution which provided for its existence, met and 
adopted a code of laws, including in same the Federal and State Con- 
stitutions. Among other things, it provided a scheme of taxation to se- 
cure revenue to meet the requirements of the State and its several di- 
visions. This scheme is based on ad valorem values of all property in 
the State, real and personal, except such as was exempted as set out 
above. It is commonly referred to as the "general property tax" sys- 
tem, and is employed wholly or in part in every State of the Union. 

The administration of the tax law, so far as the listing of values is 
concerned, is now put into the hands of three agencies: (1) Town- 
ship Assessors and their deputies; (2) County Boards of Review; (3) 
State Board of Tax Commissioners. The assessors make original as- 
.sessments on personal property every year and on realty every fourth 
year. Boards of Review make original assessments on certain public 
utilities and other corporate properties, and review and equalize the as- 
sessments of township assessors. The State Tax Board makes original 
assessments of certain other public utilities doing interstate and intra- 
state business; equalize assessments as between counties and, on ap- 
peals, reviews assessments passed by Boards of Review. 

Prior to the adoption of the present Constitution of Indiana in 1852, 
there was no state board to make original assessments of taxable prop- 
erty, nor any to review the assessments made by county boards on ap- 
peal. The State Auditor, however, was required to make original as- 
sessments of state bank stock for a time, and hear certain grievances of 
individual taxpayers on assessments made by county boards of review. 

(139) 



140 Year Book 

In 1852, the General Assembly provided for boards of equalization in 
counties, congressional districts and the State. The county board con- 
sisted of the county auditor, the appointed appraisers, and the county 
commissioners; the district board, of the county auditors of the district; 
and the state board, of the State Auditor and delegates selected by the 
district boards. The state board was authorized to equalize real prop- 
erty, but was permitted to remain in session only ten days. 

In 1872, the Legislature provided that the State Board of Equaliza- 
tion should consist of the Governor, Lieutenant-Governor, Secretary of 
State, Auditor of State, and Treasurer of- State. It was given original 
jurisdiction in the assessment of railroad, telegraph and domestic cor- 
poration properties. The right to assess the last named class of prop- 
erty was repealed a few years later. A little later still the Attorney- 
General was made a member of the board. 

Not until 1891, was there a State Board of Tax Commissioners, so 
called. It was made to consist in the beginning of the Governor, Secre- 
tary of State, Auditor of State and two appointive members not of the 
same political party — the Governor making the appointments. In 1907, 
the Governor was dropped from the board and a third appointive mem- 
ber provided for, and thus it remains. 

THE commission's ACTIVITIES 

It is the duty of the Commission, or some member of it, to visit each 
county in the State at least once a year to confer with the local taxing 
officers and to advise with them as to their duties. These officers consist 
of county and township assessors, county auditors and county treasurers. 
Boards of Review are also visited and a-dvised as to matters they have 
under consideration. All these things are done with a purpose to secure 
intracounty and intercounty equalization of assessments. Better re- 
sults, perhaps, were obtained this year than in many former years in 
this particular, but far from satisfactory to either the Commission or 
local authorities. In total personal and corporate assessments, however, 
there has been an increase of about $110,000,000 in the State, but this 
increase is not proportionate to the increase in values of these classes of 
property generally. This may be accounted for partly in the fact of 
large investments in war securities which are not taxable. 

ECONOMIES of ADMINISTRATION 

The Commission, during the year, sought by every means possible to 
conserve the State's finances by practicing economies wherever it could 
be done without sacrificing efficiency. It has been customary to have 
several employes in the office to do the clerical work of the board — all 
efficient enough but with limitations. These employes embraced a 
clerk at .$2,400 a year; a stenographer at $1,200 a year, and official re- 
porters during the sessions of the board at average salaries of about 
$1,000 a year — in all about $4,600. In addition to this, the board as 
previously organized, employed an attorney at an expense of $2,500 a 
year. This, added to the expense for clerk hire, etc., made $7,100. The 
present board has depended upon the office of the Attorney-General for 
such advice as was formerly given by the special attorney. The expense 



State Board Tax Commissioners 141 

of the. department, therefore, as at present organized, is as follows: 
Clerk and reporter, which is now the same person, $2,800 a year; as- 
sistants during the closing days of sessions about $160, in all $2,960. 
This shows a saving to the department of about $4,140 a year. 

There was another item of expense of $3,000 which did not properly 
belong to the business of the department for the fiscal year ending Sep- 
tember 30, 1918. In August, 1916, the Western Union Telegraph Com- 
pany filed a suit in the circuit court of Marion County, asking that the 
State Auditor and the State Tax Board be enjoined from certifying to 
the several counties of the State an assessment placed against it by the 
board. In 1917 a similar action was taken in regard to the assessment 
for that year. In 1917, also, five public utilities of Indianapolis, took 
similar action in regard to the assessments placed against them for 
that year. Temporary injunctions were granted by the court in all of 
these cases, the aggregate values being $26,254,627. The board em- 
ployed .special council, which co-operating with the legal department of 
the State, had the injunctions dissolved. The assessments were then 
certified and placed upon the tax duplicates of the State. This item of 
expense was properly chargeable to previous years, but of necessity is 
included in this year's expenditures. The expenditure is further amply 
justified in the fact that the taxes have been paid, together with penal- 
ties for delinquency, the latter alone amounting to about $50,000. 

TAX LEVIES 

Under the general property tax system, assessment values and tax 
levies are the factors that determine public revenue. When values and 
rates are applied to the problem of revenue getting, the amount of rev- 
enue is determined by the product of the assessment and the rate. As 
values are increased, the rates may be reduced in the same ratio and 
yield the same revenue, and vice versa. 

In some localities, and in many individual cases throughout the State, 
there is a disposition to strive for low assessments, in violation of law, 
and it is sometimes the case that assessing officers, through misconception 
of the statute, or through ulterior motives, are parties to the miscar- 
riage of the good intentions of the Legislature which framed and passed 
the tax law. In some instances incompetency without bad intent brings 
the same result of under-assessment. In any event, however, depreci- 
ated values have usually been compensated for by appreciated tax rates, 
although one authority determines values, and a different authority fixes 
the tax rates. 

Admitting the fact that low assessments and high levies may yield 
the same revenue as high assessments and low levies, it is regrettable 
that it is not always clear, judging by acts of taxpayers and taxing of- 
ficers, that the latter is far better than the former, provided assess- 
ments are within the statutory limitation of "true cash value," and the 
levies based on the actual needs of government for revenue. High levies 
drive intangible property out of the country, or force it into hiding, 
while low levies invite capital to come in and manifest itself in business. 

In some municipalities of the State, high levies have become a menace 
to prosperity, for the individual and the community, almost compelling 
dishonesty in the listing of property for taxation. The conscientious 



142 Year Book 

owner of property sees his income confiscated, and is therefore tempted 
above that which he is able to bear, and not infrequently lays his con- ' 
science aside and purposely fails to list his property. When this 'is done, 
those who continue to have regard for their obligations to the govern- 
ment are penalized for their integrity. 

Low assessments and high levies necessarily go together, except in 
some cases where extraordinary conditions exist, compelling high levies 
even with reasonably high assessments. The tax rate tables which fol- 
low in this report will afford an interesting study for all who give the 
subject of taxation thoughtful consideration. 

INHERITANCE TAX DEPARTMENT 

The inheritance tax department was under the direction of Albert E. 
Humke, Inheritance Tax Investigator, from the enactment of the law 
until August 1, 1918, at which time Frank D. Hughes was appointed 
to succeed Mr. Humke. 

The inheritance tax law after five years, during which there have 
been two sessions of the Legislature, remains practically as originally 
enacted. But few amendments have been made, and those mainly to 
make clear ambiguities in the original act and to make it more efficient. 
There have been no changes in the rates. Criticism of the law so fre- 
quently indulged in at the start, that it was unfair, has practically 
ceased. The law has proved workable and the resulting revenue has 
met expectations. 

The inheritance tax law taxes the transfer, not the property itself; 
it is a tax upon the privilege of receiving property from an ancestor, 
which right exists only by reason of permission of law. However, the 
tax remains a lien on the property transferred until paid, and the per- 
sons to whom the property is transferred and the administrators and 
executors are personally liable for such taxes until paid. The pos- 
sibilities of this provision might well be considered in connection with 
the purchase of real estate. 

The administration of the inheritance tax law by the county officials 
is generally to be commended. However, in a few localities there is a 
tendency to laxness, especially in permitting the tax to remain unpaid 
after the amount has been determined by the court. There is reason to 
believe that some of the safe deposit institutions of the State have failed 
to take cognizance of the provisions of the law concerning contents of 
deposit boxes. The attention of such companies is called to Section 2 of 
the Inheritance Tax law. But few attempts to avoid payment of the full 
amount of tax have been detected in the past year, and the number of 
errors due to inadvertence is decreasing. If county clerks were required 
to report immediately all applications for letters of administration, the 
work of the inheritance tax department would be somewhat increased, 
but it is believed that the cost of such additional work would be more 
than repaid by the additional tax derived from estates now being over- 
looked. Also, the work on estates which would not pay a tax would be 
more than compensated for by the advantages received by the people at 
large, for the reason that long-drawn-out administrations, with conse- 
quent expense and dissipation of property would be prevented and the 
probate records and titles to property placed in much better condition* 



State Board Tax Commissioners 143 

The amount assessed by the courts for the fiscal year is shown by the 
table below. These figures do not represent the amounts actually col- 
lected, as inheritance taxes often are not paid for considerable time fol- 
lowing their assessment. To encourage early payment, a discount of 
five per cent is given if paid within one year and for failure to pay 
within eighteen months a penalty of ten per cent is imposed. In a 
gradually increasing number of cases advantage is being taken of this 
discount. 

The annual tax upon property is in most cases greater than the in- 
heritance tax paid upon the transfer of the same property at the death 
of the owner. When heirs, devisees and legatees who frequently do noth- 
ing to earn the property they receive pay less tax on the transfer than 
the owner who earned or produced the property paid annually, the latter 
as a general property taxpayer is the one who is unjustly treated. 

There has been a noticeable tendency among the States having a 
transfer tax law to increase primary rates, and the Indiana rates are 
appreciably lower than some of the States having older laws than ours. 
There is also a tendency to lower the point at which the higher rates 
take effect. As the smaller estates are much more numerous, the effect 
of such a change in this State would become quite material. 

Since the adoption of the law, but few decisions have been handed 
down by our Supreme Court in construing the law, and precedents in 
other States having similar laws must necessarily be resorted to by the 
officials who have to do with its administration. 

The original inheritance tax act provided that the taxes collected, less 
expenses of collection, should be paid into the treasury of the State for 
the use of the State, applicable to the expenses of the State govern- 
ment, and to such other purposes as the Legislature should direct. The 
Legislature of 1917 directed that the proceeds should go into the state 
highway fund. Litigation questioning the validity of the state highw^ay 
law is still pending and the greater part of the moneys transferred to 
this fund are still in the fund. The net amount of collections since 
April 1, 1917, was $754,442.50, of which $535,676.03 was paid during the 
fiscal year. 

In the past year there have been but four estates administered in 
which the tax amounted to more than $10,000, the largest being $13,- 
678.43. Approximately 400 cases have been appraised wherein no tax 
was found to be due. The average number of estates handled each 
month since the law went into effect is 118.1, and the average amount 
of taxes assessed per month during the same time is $28,576.96. During 
the past year the average number of estates per month w^as 173.8 and 
the average amount assessed per month was $37,706.71. The cost of ap- 
praisements has been 3.131 per cent of the taxes assessed. 

The taxes assessed by the different courts for the fiscal years ending 
September 30, since the passage of the law, are as follows : 

1914, estates taxed, 623, tax imposed $191,669 44 

1915, estates taxed, 1,439, tax imposed 300,507 24 

1916, estates taxed, 1,709, tax imposed 323,139 43 

1917, estates taxed. 1,819, tax imposed 589,705 6L 

1918, estates taxed, 2,086, tax imposed 452,480 5o 

Totals 7,676 $1,857,502 30 



144 



Year Book 



AVERAGE TOTAL TAX LEVIES FOR QUADRENNIAL PERIOD 

1915, 1916, 1917 AND 1918 FOR COUNTIES, CITIES, 

TOWNS AND TOWNSHIPS 

The following tables show the average total levies in the several 
counties of the State for county, cities, towns and townships for the 
years 1915, 1916, 1917 and 1918; also the average of the State on county, 
city, town and township levies, separately and collectively, for the same 
years : 

AVERAGE LEVIES 19L5 



Counties 


>> 

1 


o 


ss 


S 

S 

H 


Counties 


1 


"43 

o 


1 


1 
1 




$2 975 
2 54.^ 
2 49P 

2 685 

3 110 

2 360 

3 060 

2 S30 

3 160 

2 725 

3 200 

2 340 

3 510 
2 840 
2 925 

2 820 
2 425 
2 885 
2 435 
2 235 

2 425 

2 700 

3 285 
2 890 
2 950 

2 680 

3 310 

2 745 
2 980 

2 255 

3 000 

2 son 

2 630 
2 690 

2 985 
2 665 
2 850 
2 960 

2 820 
2 936 

2 285 

3 280 

2 400 

2 130 

3 485 
2 495 


$4 93 
3 00 
3 08 

'4'4l' 

3 22 

4'56" 
3 70 
3 72 

3 90 

3 08 

'sm 

3 74 

3 74 
3 46 
3 50 
3 25 
3 65 

3 18 

3 12 

4 27 

•4-i6- 

4 09 
4 69 
4 20 
3 45 

3 26 

■3'27 

4 00 

4 04 

3 58 

4 14 
4 23 

3 61 

3 76 

2 94 

4 35 

3 36 

'4'55 

4 20 


S3 90 
3 65 

2 87 

3 49 

3 30 
3 34 

3 91 

4 52 
3 51 

3 81 
3 13 
3 93 
3 42 
3 32 

3 08 
3 21 
3 51 
3 56 
2 93 

2 64 

2 96 

3 58 
3 00 

3 51 

2 97 

4 01 

3 10 
3 69 

2 74 

3 23 
3 11 
3 03 
3 44 

3 74 

3 42 

4 19 
3 75 

2 93 

3 74 

2 92 

3 60 

2 98 

2 75 

3 51 
3 74 


S2 58 
2 35 
2 29 
2 25 

2 47 

1 97 

3 01 

2 54 
2 83 
2 43 

2 79 

2 03 

3 28 
2 51 
2 67 

2 61 

1 97 

2 47 
2 1] 

1 76 

2 19 
2 51 
2 89 
2 85 
2 60 

2 34 
2 50 
2 16 
2 30 

1 93 

2 84 
2 57 
2 12 
2 50 

2 52 
2 38 
2 54 
2 48 

2 72 

2 79 
2 00 
2 87 

1 97 

1 91 

2 89 
2 28 




$3 06(1 
2 915 
2 130 

2 590 

3 160 

3 435 
3 250 
2 820 
2 770 
2 610 

2 175 

2 950 

3 530 
3 025 

2 625 

3 030 
2 540 
2 720 

2 625 

3 315 

2 740 
2 990 
2 980 

2 465 

3 130 

2 090 
2 770 

4 010 
2 590 

2 680 

3 240 
3 280 
2 475 
2 540 

2 425 
2 580 
2 985 

2 770 

3 140 

2 955 

2 975 

3 070 

2 326 

2 920 

3 365 
2 300 


$4 45 
4 37 

2 55 

3 68 

4 05 

4 26 

5 08 

3 78 

4 06 

3 11 

3 66 

3 68 

'4*74' 
3 93 

3 70 

3 77 

3 72 

4 06 

3 00 

3 72 

'.s'ei' 
3 75 

3 82 
3 76 
3 12 
3 90 

3 58 

3 22 

4 32 

's'si' 

3 32 

4 60 
3 73 
3 24 


$d 36 
3 43 

2 30 

3 78 

4 06 

4 21 
4 24 
3 17 
3 14 

3 45 

2 72 

'4*59* 

4 31 

2 85 

3 18 
3 76 
3 53 
3 00 
3 97 

3 40 
3 41 

3 55 

2 71 

3 59 

2 48 

3 17 

4 78 
3 53 
3 37 

3 89 
3 40 
3 18 
3 10 

3 23 

2 72 

3 61 
3 33 

3 49 

4 05 
3 38 
3 37 

2 42 

3 26 

4 23 
3 41 


$2 69 


AUen 




2 31 


Bartholomew. 


Marion 


1 75 


Benton 


Marshall 

Martin . ... 


1 89 


Blackford 


2 86 


Boone . 


Miami 

Monroe 

Montgomerj' 


2 92 


Brown 


2 85 


Carroll 


2 36 


Cass 


Moro'an 


2 58 


Clark . 


Newton 


2 20 


Clay 


Noble 


1 86 


Clinton 


Ohio 


2 78 


Crawford 


Orange 


3 18 


Daviess 


Owen 

Parke 


2 83 




2 52 


Decatur 


Perry 


2 82 


Dekalb 


Pike 


2 27 




Porter 


2 35 


Dubois 

Elkhart 


Posey 

Pulaski 


2 33 

3 10 


Fayette.. 

Floyd.. 

Fountain 


Putnam. 


2 49 


Randolph 


2 58 


Ripley 


2 71 


Franklin 


Rush 


2 29 


Fulton 


Scott 

Shelby 

Spencer 


3 04 


Gibson 


2 00 


Grant 


2 44 


Greene. 

Hamilton 

Hancock 


Starke 

Steuben 

St. Joseph 


3 67 
2 12 
2 17 


Harrison 

Hendricks. . 

Henry 

Howard. . . . •. 


Sullivan 

Switzerland 


2 74 

3 16 
2 27 


Tipton 

Union 

Vanderburgh 

Vermillion 

Vigo 


2 13 




2 16 


Jackson . . 


2 28 




2 24 


Jay . 


2 64 




Wabash..'. 


2 78 




Warren 


2 59 


Johnson 


Warrick 


2 73 


Knox 


Washington .. 

Wayne. 


2 87 


TCo.<?riii«!kn 


2 17 


Lagrange 

Lake 


Wells 


2 51 


White 


2 87 


Laporte 


Whitley 


1 98 




4iverigp 


$2 8J8 


S3 834 


S3 361 


?2 465 













Average of State for all cities, towns and townships, $2,803 



State Board Tax Commissioners 



146 



AVERAGE LEVIES 1916 



CoxmTiBs 


1 

s 


•1 

O 






Counties 


>> 

"a 
§ 



1 




i 


a. 

1 
1 




S3 035 
2 620 
2 550 

2 870 

3 705 

2 520 

3 235 
3 280 
2 960 

2 700 

3 050 

2 365 

3 630 
2 855 
2 890 

2 820 

2 490 

3 165 
2 460 
2 .550 

2 575 

2 850 

3 260 
3 260 
2 920 

2 890 

3 430 

2 960 

3 390 
2 465 

2 990 


$5 14 
3 04 
3 38 

■508' 

3 16 

477' 
3 60 
3 67 

3 91 

3 68 

■3 95" 
3 88 

3 74 
3 63 
3 96 
3 33 
3 94 

3 18 

3 40 

4 30 

■3"72' 

4 14 
4 84 
4 40 
4 30 
3 00 


$3 95 
3 47 

2 89 

3 77 

3 47 

3 81 

4 44 
4 11 
3 08 

3 55 

3 08 

4 18 
3 33 
3 30 

3 02 
3 30 

3 85 
3 58 
3 26 

2 96 

3 06 
3 62 
3 31 
3 35 

3 34 

4 18 

3 28 

4 03 
3 04 

3 06 
3 54 
3 24 
3 68 

3 81 

3 46 

4 14 

3 88 

2 91 

4 11 

3 14 
3 52 

3 01 

2 63 

3 34 

4 20 


$2 64 
2 43 
2 35 
2 38 
3^02 

2 16 

3 12 
2 98 
2 67 
2 43 

2 69 

2 07 

3 32 
2 58 
2 61 

2 63 

1 99 

2 71 
2 13 
2 07 

2 31 

2 66 

2 81 

3 24 
2 66 

2 46 
2 60 
2 68 
2 73 
2 15 

2 87 
2 93 
2 35 
2 69 

2 70 
2 42 
2 71 
2 63 

2 75 
2 90 
2 20 
2 93 

2 10 

1 92 

2 70 
2 38 




.$3 280 
2 920 
2 395 

2 690 

3 165 

3 675 
3 270 
3 040 
2 990 
2 810 

2 295 

3 010 
3 705 
3 100 

2 800 

3 110 

2 650 
2 795 

2 620 

3 325 

3 110 
3 160 
3 140 

2 630 

3 240 

2 175 

2 625 

3 855 
2 850 

2 815 

3 355 
3 190 
2 545 
2 670 

2 450 
2 570 


14 72 
4 24 

2 G9 
4 09 

3 97 

4 38 
4 98 
4 00 
4 20 

3 37 
3 86 

:::::: 
3 74 

'4"40' 
3 91 

3 86 
3 91 

3 70 

4 10 

3 14 
3 57 

'4'64' 
3 75 

3 SO 
3 60 
3 18 
3 94 

'.^,38 


n 69 

3 41 

2 54 

3 76 

4 12 

4 37 
4 20 
3 37 
3 41 

3 69 

2 81 

'4"86 

4 15 

3 13 

3 17 
3 88 
3 61 
3 06 
3 99 

3 76 
3 63 
3 76 

2 87 

3 96 

3 04 

3 03 

4 60 
3 61 

3 44 

4 00 
3 25 
3 20 
3 33 

3 20 

3 95' 
3 66 

3 80 

4 09 

3 38 

3 72 

2 71 

3 50 

4 13 
3 59 


?2 88 


AUen 


Madison ... 


2 ?.8 


Bartholomew. . 


Marion 


1 89 


Benton . 


Marshall. . . 


2 0'' 


Blackford 


Martin 


2 87 


Boone 


Miami 


3 28 






2 90 


Carroll 




2 59 


Cass 


Morgan 


2 79 


Clark 


Newton 

Noble . . . 


2 37 


Clay 


1 97 


Clinton ;.... 


Ohio 


2 80 


Crawford. . . . 


Orange 


3 25 




Owen 


2 94 


Dearborn. 


Parke 


2 65 




Perry 


2 92 


Dekalb 


Pike 


2 38 


Delaware 


Porter 

Posey 


2 46 


Dubois 


2 32 


Klk-hart., , 


Pulaski 

Putnam 


3 11 


Fayette . ... 


2 88 


Floyd. . . 


Randolph 


2 72 




Ripley 


2 87 


Franklin 


Rush 


2 47 


Fulton 


Scott 


3 10 


Gibson 


Shelby 


2 05 


Grant 




2 30 


Greene 


Starke 


3 53 


Hamilton 


Steuben 


2 37 


Hancock 


St. Joseph 

Sullivan 


2 31 


Harrison 


2 88 


Hendricks 

Henry 


3 190l 

2 860 .^ 86 


Switzerland 

Tippecanoe 

Tipton 


3 11 

2 35 


Howard 


2 870 

3 135 

2 725 

3 010 
3 120 

2 850 

3 080 

2 535 

3 320 

2 490 

2 140 

3 315 
2 605 


4 08 

4 34 

3 86 

4 62 
4 55 

3 67 
3 98 

3 16 

4 41 

3 45 

'4'6r 

4 24 


2 24 


Htratington 

Jackson . . . 


Union 

Vanderburgh. 


2 20 
2 27 


Jasoer 




3 320 4 10 

2 880 3 24 

3 260 ' 4 10 

3 010 

3 080 4 34 
3 340 

1 

2 460 3 30 

3 085 5 12 
3 305 3 84 
2 425 3 36 


2 54 


Jay. . 


Vigo 

Wabash 


2 72 


Jefferson 


2 83 


Jftnnings , 


Warren 


2 65 


Johnson 


Warrick 


2 84 


Knox 


Washington 


3 08 


Kosciusko 


2 23 


Lagrange 


Wells 


2 58 


Lake ... 


White 


2 81 


Laporte 


Whitley . ... 


2 10 




Average 






$2 943 S3 948 


S3 487 


?2 577 



Average of State for all cities, towns and townships, $2,922. 



Ifr— lt96< 



146 



Year Book 



AVfiRAGEfiLEVIES 1917 



Counties 


>> 


j 


1 


.2* 


Counties 








^ 


a 

H 




$3 075 
^ 785 
2 405 

2 855 

3 480 


$5 13 
3 32 
3 70 

'5'65" 

3 00 

'4'84' 
3 60 

3 8b 

4 11 

3 55 

3 81 

3 74 
3 80 
3 90 

3 41 

4 25 

3 28 

3 40 

4 33 

■3' 04' 

4 12 
4 99 
4 41 
4 07 

2 70 

■3'94 

3 98 

4 62 

3 94 

4 56 
4 66 

4 08 
3 00 

3 16 

4 77 

3 82 

'iho 

4 42 


$4 01 
3 55 

2 81 

3 77 

3 47 

3 96- 

4 69 
4 19 
3 10 

3 53 

2 99 

4 13 

3 42 
3 13 

2 85 

3 37. 
3 7e 
3 S6 
3 50 

3 08 
3 03 

3 49 

2 97 

4 02 

3 37 

4 08 
3 50 
3 77 
3 13 

3 38 
3 94 
3 17 

3 25 

4 01 
3 81 

3 77 

4 Ob 

3 03 

4 29 
3 52 
3 57 

3 04 

2 S5 

3 33 

4 20 


«2 68 
2 61 
2 28 
2 36 
2 69 

2 17 

3 14 
3 14 
2 82 
2 51 

2 71 
2 06 
2 95 
2 63 
2 46 

2 61 
2 05 

2 77 
2 07 
2 14 

2 44 
2 48 

2 74 

3 08 
2 69 

2 52 
2 71 
2 70 
2 51 

2 20 

3 07 
3 34 
2 33 
2 70 

2 82 
2 59 

2 89 

2 82 

2 82 
2 97 

2 38 

3 10 

2 20 
2 02 
2 59 
2 61 




S3 610 
2 820 
2 420 

2 840 

3 220 

3 750 
3 325 
3 105 
3 000 
2 920 

2 475 

2 935 

3 840 
3 300 

2 905 

3 330 
2 720 
2 780 

2 750 

3 350 

3 270 
3 150 
3 280 

2 775 

3 290 

2 110 

3 080 
3 870 
2 975 

2 750 

3 365 
3 220 
2 625 
2 560 

2 535 

2 700 

3 390 
3 000 

3 315 

2 940 

3 250 
3 545 

1 500 
3 240 
3 430 
2 605 


S4 97 
4 18 

2 75 

3 SI 

4 30 

4 78 

5 08 
4 05 
4 00 

■3 84 

3 92 

4 16 

"4 70* 

3 92 

4 56 
4 00 
4 14 
3 98 

3 22 
3 99 

■4' 23" 
3 93 

3 77 
3 72 
3 58 

3 80 

'§'83" 

4 78 

3 38 

4 10 
■4'72 

3 28 

5 42 
3 66 
3 86 


U 37 
3 25 

2 67 

3 98 

4 28 

i 31 

4 09 

3 45 
3 48 

3 85 

2 99 

'4' 8.3" 

4 20 

3 25 

3 44 
3 79 
3 51 

3 31 

4 20 

3 80 
3 65 
3 79 

3 27 

4 00 

3 06 

3 52 

4 58 
3 73 
3 31 

3 89 
3 47 
3 24 
3 31 

3 37 

3'87' 
3 46 

3 79 
3 98 

3 95 

2 74 

3 65 

4 36 
3 65 


.*3 15 


Allen 


Madison 


2 29 




2 00 


Benton 


Marshall 


2 17 


Blackford 


Martin 

Miami 

Monroe . 


2 86 

3 40 




2 525 

3 275 
3 435 
3 000 

2 765 

3 090 

2 330 

3 370 
2 935 

2 740 

2 760 

2 560 

3 170 
2 460 
2 690 

2 075 

2 730 

3 185 

2 880 

3 100 

2 925 

3 490 
3 015 
3 155 

2 495 

3 195 
3 595 
2 815 

2 835 

3 290 

2 025 

3 lOo 
3 305 

2 950 


Brown 


2 99 


CarroU 




2 65 


Cass 


Morgan . . 


2 70 


Clark 




2 46 


Clay 


Noble 


2 11 




Ohio 


2 69 


Crawford . . 


Orange 


3 45 


Davdess 


Owen . . 


3 04 


Dearborn 


Parke 

Perry 

Pike 


2 75 


Decatur, 


3 08 


Dekalb 


2 48 


Delaware 


Porter 


2 41 




2 41 


Elkhart 


Pulaski 

Putnam 

Randolph 

Ripley 


3 07 


Fayette 


3 03 


Floyd 


2 68 




3 02 


Franklin 


Rush 


2 60 


Fulton 


Scott 


3 15 


Gibson 


Shelby . . 


1 98 


Grant 




2 74 




Starke 


3 56 


Hamilton 


Steuben 


2 50 


Hancock 

Harrison . . . 


St. Joseph 

S\illivan 


2 22 
2 97 






3 06 


Henry 


Tippecanne 


2 41 




Tipton 

Union 1 


2 10 


Huntington 


2 26 


Jackson 


Yanderburgh 

Vermillion 


2 28 




2 63 


Jay 


2 89 


Jefferson 


Wabash 


2 94 


Jennina;s. . . . 


3 140 

2 760 

3 500 

2 575 

2 230 

3 325 

2 825 


Warren 

Warrirk 


2 60 




2 98 


Knox . . . . 


Washington 

Wayne 

Well=! 


3 27 


Kosciusko 


2 26 


Lagrange 

Lake 


2 73 . 


White 

Whitley ... 


2 91 


Laporte 


2 27 




Average .... 






,|3 OOC 


$4 088 


.53 547 


S2 638 



Average for State for all cities, towns and townships, $2.! 



State Board Tax Commissioners 



147 



AVERAGE LEVIES 1918 



Counties 



Adams 

AUen 

Bartholomew. 

Benton 

Blackford . . . . 



Boone. 
Brown . 
Carroll. 
Cass. . . 
Clark . 



Clay 

Clinton. . 
Crawford . 
Daviess . 
Dearborn . 

Decatur. . 
Dekalb... 
Delaware 
Dubois... 
Elkhart. . 



Fayette. . 
Floyd. . . . 
Fountain. 
Franklin. 
Fulton... 



Gibson . . . 

Grant 

Greene. . . 
Hamilton. 
Hancock . 



Harrison . . 
Hendricks . 

Henry 

Howard. . . 



Huntington. 

Jackson 

Jasper 

Jay 



Jefferson . 
Jennings . 
Johnson. 
Knox . . . . 



Kosciusko. 
Lagrange. . 

Lake 

Laporte . . . 



$3 106 
2 882 
2 415 

2 866 

3 556 

2 392 

3 331 
3 907 
3 299 

2 815 

3 552 

2 629 

3 481 
2 913 
2 632 

2 769 

2 169 

3 213 
2 489 
2 749 

2 784 

2 780 

3 105 

2 606 

3 152 

3 15') 
3 571 

2 962 

3 295 
2 343 

2 958 

3 630 
2 854 

2 998 

3 079 

2 859 

3 117 
3 078 



3 251 
3 263 

2 684 

3 470 

2 584 

2 437 

3 546 
2 663 



$5 47 
3 68 
3 98 



5 35 



5 40 
4 32 
4 56 



4 28 
4 26 

4'20' 

2 51 

4 00 

3 93 

4 38 
3 5^ 
3 28 

3 63 

3 72 

4 43 



3 80 

4 3.5 

5 47 
4 49 
3 80 
2 90 



3 98 

4 30 

4 46 
4 02 
4 54 

3 24 

4 20 

3 07 
J 36 

4 90 

4 35 

's'oi' 

3 74 



$4 10 
3 65 

2 67 

3 86 



3 42 

3 98 
5 35 

4 48 
3 19 

3 63 

3 08 

4 15 
3 19 

3 27 

2 88 

3 40 



3 37 
3 08 
3 34 

2 78 

3 90 



3 69 

4 17 

4 43 
3 85 

2 84 

3 09 

4 00 
3 23 
3 8S 

3 61 

3 78 

3 87 

4 05 



$2 06 
2^69 
2 20 
2 36 
2 66 

2 01 

3 20 
3 57 
2 98 
2 49 

2 62 
2 OS 
2 74 
2 55 
2 49 

2 5S 
2 11 
2 76 
2 07 
2 23 

2 40 
2 47 
2 64 
2 54 
2 76 

2 67 
2 67 
2 63 

2 75 
2 Co 

2 86 

3 35 
2 33 

2 80 

2 61 
2 50 
2 89 
2 73 

2 M 
2 93 

2 30 

3 02 

2 16 
2 15 

2 84 
2 61 



Counties 



Lawrence 

Madison . . . . 

Marion 

Marshall . . . . 
Martin 

Miami 

Monroe 

Montgomery 

Morgan 

Newton 

Noble 

Ohio 

Orange 

Owen 

Parke 

Perry 

Pike 

Porter 

Posey 

Pulaski 

Putnam 

Randolph . . . 

Ripley 

Rush 

Scott 

Shelby 

Spencer 

Starke 

Steuben 

St. Joseph. . 

Sullivan 

Switzerland . , 
Tippecanoe. . 
Tipton 

Union 

Vanderburgh 
Vermillion . . . 
Vigo 

Wabash 

Warren 

Warrick 

Washington. 

Wayne 

WeUs 

White 

Whitley 

Average 



$3 478 
2 818 

2 498 

3 408 
3 548 

3 871 
3 424 
3 118 
3 928 

3 140; 

2 472 

2 974 

3 451 
3 080 

2 828 

3 195 
2 862 
2 862 

2 965 

3 642 

3 174 
3 233 
3 390 

2 595 

3 .255 

2 214 

3 025 
3 880 
3 027 

2 899 

3 278 
3 112 

2 908 
2 722 

2 581 

2 861 

3 519 

2 923 

3 462 

2 688 

3 097 
3 390 

2 577 

3 683 
3 509 
2 780 



S5 24 
4 64 
2 82 
4 61 

4 31 

5 46 
5 30 
4 31 
4 12 



3 27 

4 00 



4 12 



3 44 
3 95 



4 32 
4 40 

3 72 

3 72 

4 35 
4 54 



4 76 



3 50 
5 34 

4 27 
4 72 



$3 069 $4 188 



$3 94 

3 27 
2 73 

4 13 
4 65 



3 07 



4 60 
4 17 
3 22 

3 37 

4 00 
3 67 

3 48 

4 44 



3 94 

2 29 

4 15 

3 15 

3 51 

4 76 
3 78 
3 58 

3 78 
3 47 
3 61 
3 52 

3 41 

4'6o' 

3 77 



3 82 
3 33 
3 85 

2 85 

3 94 

4 33 
3 75 



$3 619 



Average for State for all cities, towns and townships, i3.018. 



148 Year Book 

RECAPITULATION OF AVERAGE TAX LEVIES IN INDIANA AND 
OTHER INFORMATION 

1915 1916 1917 1918 

1. Average of Total Levies of All Cities, 

Towns and Townships of State $2,803 $2,922 $2,988 $3,018 

2. Average Tax Levy of All Counties of 

State 2.818 2.943 3.000 3.069 

3. Average Total Tax Levy of All Cities 

of State 3.834 3.948 4.088 4.188 

4. Average Total Tax Levy of All Towns 

in State 3.361 3.487 3.547 3.619 

5. Average Total Tax Levy of All Town- 

ships in State 2.465 2.577 2.638 2.641 

Explanation — 
No. 1 is obtained by dividing the sum of the total levies of all cities, 

towns and townships in the State by 1,543, the total number of 

cities, towns and townships in the State. 
No. 2 is obtained by adding the average of the total tax levies in all 

the counties of the State and dividing same by 92, the number 

of counties in the State. 
No. 3 is obtained by dividing the sum of the total levies of all cities in 

the State by the number of cities in State. 
No. 4 is obtained by dividing the sum of the total levies of all towns in 

the State by the number of towns in the State. 
No. 5 is obtained by dividing the sum of the total levies of all town- 
ships in the State by 1,016, the number of townships in the 

State. 

LOWEST AND HIGHEST TOWNSHIP LEVIES 

Among the 1,016 townships of the State, the first ten in the list given 
below have the lowest total levies, and the last ten have the highest 
total levies in the State: 

Addison, in Shelby County $1 29 

Wayne, in Noble County 1 35 

Eel, in Cass County 1 40 

Turkey Creek, Kosciusko County 1 40 

Portage, St. Joseph County 1 43 

Sugar Creek, Clinton County 1 44 

Cicero, Tipton County 1 54 

Harrison, Kosciusko County 1 56 

Clay, Bartholomew County 1 57 

Center, Boone County 1 58 

****** 

Butler, Miami County 3 81 

Jackson, Carroll County 8 89 

Jackson, Starke County 3 90 

Carrollton, Carroll County 3 94 

Monroe, Carroll County 3 94 

Union, Miami County 3 96 



Tmk 






4 15? 



TAX i^: 



Tie ~ntT n vw ' n^ Taiiic Mmmk tt 
ji^ns uTfT jUM>ni»tTTgs in. eadi. «f 1 

ZTTTsi »• i i.h ~7Te ^LLTiLy Jixiv i Rg ~h e 
cy Ae ngg IiieB u at aid 5d 



rtrrt<»«gr iVT^aUK -umi ~?IX JiV v i r^- TDt- 




150 



Year Book 



TOTAL TAX LEVIES IN CITIES 

The total tax levies for the ninety-eight cities in the State in 1918, for 
taxes due and payable in 1919 are as follows, those with the highest total 
levies being named first and so on through the list to the lowest, which is 
the place of honor: 



City Levy 

1 — Hammond $5.80 

2— Gas City 5.78 

3— Mitchell 5.70 

4 — Elwood 5.69 

5 — Montpelier 5 . 64 

6— East Chicago 5.48 

7 — Decatur 5.47 

8— Peru 5.46 

9— Delphi 5.40 

10— Gary 5.40 

11— Marion 5.36 

12— Bluffton 5.34 

13 — Bloomington 5 .30 

14— Bicknell 5.19 

15— Hartford City 5.06 

16— Dunkirk 4 . 92 

17— Greencastle 4.90 

18 — Veedersburg 4 . 84 

19 — Linton 4 . 82 

20— Clinton 4.78 

21— Bedford 4.78 

22— Boonville 4.76 

23 — Valparaiso 4.76 

24— Columbia City 4 . 72 

25 — Laporte 4 . 66 

26— Plymouth 4.61 

27— South Bend 4.61 

28 — Jeff ersonville 4.56 

29— Portland 4.56 

30 — Michigan City 4.54 

31 — Rensselaer 4 . 54 

32 — Tipton 4.54 

33— Mt. Vernon 4.54 

34— Goshen 4.52 

35— Auburn 4.48 

36— Elkhart 4.46 

37 — Huntington 4.46 

38 — Cannelton 4 . 42 

39 — Winchester 4 . 42 

40 — Alexandria 4 . 39 

41 — Muncie 4 . 38 

42— Batesville 4:38 

43— Princeton 4.36 

44— Wabash 4 .36 

45 — Warsaw 4 . 35 

46— Lafayette 4.35 

47 — Vincennes 4.34 

48— Angola 4.32 

49 — Logansport 4 . 32 



City Levy 

50 — Crawfordsville $4.31 

51 — Ladoga 4 . 31 

52 — Ligonier 4.31 

53 — Kokomo 4.30 

54— Brazil 4.28 

55— Crown Point 4.28 

56 — Monticello 4 . 27 

57— Frankfort 4.26 

58— Aurora 4.25 

59 — Covington ., 4 . 22 

60— Attica 4.22 

61— Washington 4.20 

62— Madison 4.20 

63 — Jasonville 4.17 

64— Martinsville 4.12 

65— Whiting 4.10 

66— Rising Sun 4 . 06 

67— Evansville 4.02 

68 — Seymour 4 . 02 

69 — Greensburg 4.00 

70— Rushville 4.00 

71— Union City ; . 4.00 

72 — Mishawaka 4.00 

73— Columbus 3 . 98 

74— New Castle 3.98 

75— Mt. Vernon 3.. 97 

76— Rockport 3.95 

77— Anderson 3 .83 

78— Tell City 3 .82 

79— Rochester 3 . 80 

80— Nobles ville 3.80 

81— Garrett 3.74 

82— Sullivan 3.72 

83— Vevay 3.72 

84— New Albany ..3.72 

85— Ft. Wayne 3 . 68 

86— Terre Haute 3.68 

87— Kendallville 3.64 

88 — Lawrenceburg 3 . 64 

89— Connersville 3 . 62 

90— Jasper 3.60 

91— Butler 3.56 

92— Richmond 3.50 

93— Huntington 3.46 

94— Shelbyville 3.44 

95— Fra-nklin 3 .36 

96— Greenfield 2.90 

97— Lebanon 2.86 

98— Indianapolis .' 2 .82 



State Board Tax Commissioners 



151 



TOTAL TAX LEVIES IN TOWNS 

The total tax levies for the four hundred towns in the State in 1918, 
for taxes due and payable in 1919, are as follows, those with the highest 
total levies being named first, and so on through the list to the lowest, 
which is the place of honor: 



Towns Le 

1 — Converse $6 

2— South Peru 5 

3— Flora 5 

4 — Knox 5 

5 — Monroe 5 

6 — Lowell 5 

7— Perry City 5 

8 — Morocco 5 

9 — Amboy 5 

10— Waikel 5 

11— Redkey 5 

12— Culver 5 

13 — Winamac 5 

14 — Royal Center 5 

15 — Jonesboro 5 

16— English 4, 

17 — Camden 4 , 

18— Walkerton 4, 

19 — Francisville 4 

20— Van Buren 4 

21— Wolcott 4 

22— Albany 4 

23— Geneva 4 

24 — N. Manchester 4 

25 — North Judson 4 

26— Oakland City 4 

27— Bunker Hill 4 

28 — Shoals 4 

29— French Lick 4 

30 — Ossian 4 

31— West Shoals 4 

32— Hobart 4 

33— Orleans 4 

34— Paoli 4 

35— West Baden 4 

36 — Nappanee 4 

37— Makin 4 

38 — Marengo 4 

39— Walton 4 

40— Goodland 4 

41 — Ashley 4 

42 — Argos 4 

43 — Wakarusa 4 

44 — Hudson 4 

45 — Spencer 4 

46 — Fairmount 4 

47 — Newburg 4 

48 — Sheridan 4 

49 — Campellsburg 4 

50 — Roanoke 4 

51 — Warren 4 

52 — Danville 4 

53— Leavenworth 4 

54 — Fairland 4 



.08 
.84 
.80 
.68 
.56 
.40 
.^0 
.29 
.11 
.10 
.09 
.06 
.06 
.00 
.00 
.95 
.90 
.90 
86 



85 



36 



Towns 



Levy 



55— Westville .$4.36 

56— Brook 4.33 

57 — Corydon 4.33 

58— Ashley (DeKalb) 4.32 

59 — Andrews 4.30 

60— Ft. Branch 4.30 

61— Upland 4.30 

62— Hamlet 4.29 

63— Universal 4 29 

64— Shirley City 4 . 28 

65 — Grandview 4.27 

66— Pittsboro 4 . 27 

67— Oolitic 4.26 

68— Frankton 4.25 

69— Petersburg 4.25 

70— Salem 4.22 

71— Clayton 4.20 

72 — Monon 4.20 

73 — New Carlisle 4.20 

74 — Brookston 4.19 

75 — Greenwood 4 . 18 

76 — Medaryville 4.18 

77 — Bremen -....4.17 

78— Dale 4.17 

79— Bloomfield 4.16 

80— New Ross 4.15 

81— Scottsburg 4.15 

82— Boswell 4 14 

83— Fulton 4.14 

84 — Kewanna 4 . 14 

85— Ferdinand 4.13 

86— Newport 4.13 

87— Clay City 4.12 

88— Milan 4.11 

89— Sunman 4.10 

90 — West Lebanon 4.10 

91— Chalmers 4 . 09 

92— Sellersburg 4 . 09 

93— Cayuga 4 . 08 

94 — Hardinsburg 4 . 07 

95— Brownstown 4.06 

96— Crothersville 4.06 

97— Roann 4.06 

98— Miller 4.04 

99— W. Lafayette 4.04 

100— Williamsport 4.04 

101— Bourbon 4 . 03 

102— Ridgeville 4.03 

103— Atlanta 4.02 

104— Eaton 4.02 

105— Fowler 4 . 02 

106— W. Terre Haute 4.02 

107— Fowlerton •: 4.01 

108— North Salem 4.01 



152 



Year Book 



Towns Levy 

109— Bryant $3.99 

110— Cicero 3.98 

111— Macy 3.98 

112— Nashville 3.98 

113— Lynn 3.96 

114— Pendleton 3.96 

115— Stinesville 3.96 

116— Westfield 3.96 

117— Carlisle 3.94 

118— Hymera 3.94 

119— Reynolds 3.93 

120— Salamonia 3 .93 

121— Waterloo 3.93 

122— Coatesville 3 .92 

123— Hebron 3.92 

124— Mooresville 3.92 

125— Thorntown 3 . 92 

126— Earl Park 3.91 

127— Berne 3.90 

128— Elnora 3.90 

129— Amo - .83 

130— Gosport 3 . S8 

131 — Greentown 3 . 88 

132— Pekin 3 . 88 

lh6 — Lizton 3 . 87 

134— Shelburn 3 . 87 

135— Bloomingdale 3.86 

136— Chrisney 3.86 

137— Birdseye 3 . 85 

138— Alamo 3.84 

139 — Brownsburg 3.84 

140— Bronson 3 . 84 

141— Knightsville 3.84 

142— Lapel 3.84 

143— Ridgeville 3 . 84 

144— South Whitley 3.84 

145— Fairview Park 3 . 83 

146— Cambridge City 3 . 82 

147 — Farmersburg 3 . 82 

148— Galveston 3 . 82 

149— Normal City 3 . 82 

150— Francisco 3.80 

151— Elizabeth 3.80 

152 — Remington 3.80 

153— Schneider 3 .80 

154— Osgood 3.80 

155 — LaGrange 3.79 

156— Hazelton 3 . 78 

157— Arcadia 3 . 78 

158— Poneto 3 .78 

159— Milltown 3 .77 

160— Riverside 3 .76 

161— New Chicago 3.76 

162— Parker City 3.76 

163 — Gaston 3.76 

164— Winslow 3.7li 

165 — Fremont 3 . 74 

166— Little York 3.73 

167— Middletown 3.73 

168— Russelville 3 .72 

169— Brooklyn 3.71 

170— Hope 8.71 



Towns Levy 

171 — Merom $3 . 70 

172 — Mathews 3.70 

173— Oaktown 3.70 

174 — Owensville 3 . 69 

175— Blountsville 3 . 89 

176— Charlestown 3 . 68 

177— Akron 3 . 68 

178— East Gary 3 . 68 

179 — Summitville 3 . 68 

180— Plainfield 3.67 

181— Monterey '. 3.66 

182— East Modoc «... 3 . 66 

183— Windfall 3.66 

184— Dana 3.66 

185 — Churubusco 3 . 66 

186 — Hanover 3 . 65 

187 — New Richmond 3 . 65 

188— Wingate 3.65, 

189— Cloverdale 3 . 64 

190— Kingman 3 . 64 

191— Carthage 3.62 

192 — Fredericksburg 3.62 

193 — West Harrison 3 . 62 

194— Huron 3.62 

195— Griffin 3 . 61 

196— Westport 3.61 

197— Montezuma 3.60 

198— Rockville 3.60 

199— West Modoc 3.60 

200— Versailles 3.60 

201— Kirklin ; 3 . 60 

202— Lagro 3.60 

203 — Sidney 3 . 60 

204— Highland 3.60 

205— Carmel 3 . 59 

206— Kentland 3.58 

207— Porter 3.58 

208— North Liberty 3.58 

209— Sulphur Springs 3.58 

210— Silver Lake 3.58 

211— Hessville 3.58 

212— Center Point 3.57 

213— New Harmony 3.57 

214— Mooreland 3.57 

215 — Bainbridge 3 . 56 

216— Pine Village 3.56 

217— State Line 3.56 

218— Monroeville 3.56 

219— Selma 3.56 

220 — Mauckport 3 . 55 

221— Sanborn 3.54 

222 — Altoona 3.54 

223— Aetna 3.54 

224— W. College Corner 3.53 

225— Seeleyville 3.52 

226— Montgomery 3.52 

227— Oldenburg 3 . 52 

228— Moores Hill 3.51 

229— Livonia 3.50 

230— Bristol 3.50 

231 — Glenwood 3.50 

232— Ellettsville 3.50 



State Board Tax Commissioners 



15Z 



Towns Levy 

233— Poseyville $3.48 

234— Ambia 3.47 

235— Ladoga 3.47 

236— Darlington 3.46 

237— New Haven 3.45 

238— Alton 3.45 

239 — Georgetown 3 . 45 

240— Mt. Summit 3 . 45 

241— Mellott 3.44 

242— Worthington 3 . 44 

243— Clarkshill 3.43 

244— Zionsville 3.42 

245— Shirley 3.41 

246— Waveland 3\41 

247— Dugger 3.41 

248— Oden 3.40 

249 — Millersburg # 3.40 

250— Fishers 3.40 

251— Springport 3.40 

252— Dyer 3.40 

253— Patriot 3.40 

254 — Jamestown 3.38 

255— New Market 3.38 

256 — Kempton 3.38 

257— Otterbein 3.37 

258— Laurel 3 .37 

259— Troy 3.37 

260— Port Fulton 3.36 

261— Lakeville 3.36 

262— Battle Ground 3.36 

263 — Staunton 3 . 35 

264— Mt. Ayr 3 .35 

265 — Saltillo 3 . 35 

266— Milltown (C) 3 .34 

267— Fortville 3 .34 

268— Uniondale 3.34 

269— Linden 3,34 

270 — Patoka 3 . 33 

271— Monroe City 3.33 

272— Milford 3.33 

273— Brookville 3,32 

274— Etna Green 3.32 

275— Saratoga 3 .32 

276— Centerville 3.30 

277— Dillsboro 3.29 

278— Leesburg 3.29 

279— Cromwell 3.29 

280— Liberty 3 .28 

281— Albion 3.28 

282— Winona Lake 3 .28 

283— Mentone 3 . 26 

284— North Grove 3.26 

285 — Cynthiana 3.26 

286— Moorefield 3.26 

287— Carbon 3.25 

288— Dublin 3.25 

289— Hillsboro 3 .24 

290— Colfax 3 22 

291— Medora 3.22 

292— Griffith 3.22 

293— St. John 3.22 

294— GraybiU 8.21 



Towns Levy 

295— Lyons $3.21 

296— St. Leon 3.20 

297— Wallace 3.20 

298— Chesterfield 3.20 

299 — Newtown 3.19 

300— Cadiz 3.19 

301— Straughn 3.19 

302— Whiteland 3.19 

303— Hartsville 3 . 17 

304 — Lanesville 3 . 17 

305— Pennville 3.17 

306— Morristown 3.16 

307— Orland 3.14 

308— Shirley 3.14 

309— New Amsterdam 3 . 13 

310— Vernon 3.13 

311 — Cannelsburg 3 . 12 

312— Kennard 3.12 

313— Southport 3.11 

314— E, Connersville 3.10 

315 — Laconia 3.10 

316— Knightstown 3.10 

317— Topeka 3.10 

318— LaFontaine 3.10 

319— Syracuse 3 . 09 

320— Boston 3 . 09 

321— Fountain City 3 . 08 

322— Avilla 3 . 05 

323— New Point 3.04 

324— Judson 3 . 04 

325— Gentryville 3 . 03 

326— Munster 3.02 

327 — University Heights 3 . 01 

328— Edinburg (J.) 3.00 

329— Paragon 2.99 

330— Advance 2.98 

331 — Bargerville 2 . 98 

332 — Lynnville 2 . 98 

333— Michigantown 2.97 

334— Yorktown 2.97 

335— Glenwood 2.96 

336— Spiceland 2.96 

337 — Tennyson 2.96 

338 — Coruna 2.95 

339— Pierceton 2.95 

340— Roseland 2 . 94 

341— Elberfeld 2.94 

342— Edinburg (B.) 2.94 

343— Milltown (Har.) 2.92 

344— La Paz 2.91 

345— Newberry 2.91 

346— Whitewater 2.90 

347— Lewisville 2.90 

348— Mt. Etna 2.88 

349— Vera Cruz 2.88 

350— Swayzee 2 . 86 

351— Orestes 2.85 

352 — New Providence 2.84 

353— Marshall 2.84 

354— Claypool 2.82 

355— WolcottviUe (L.) 2.82 

356— North Madison 2.81 



154 



Year Book 



Towns Levy 

357— New Palestine $2.79 

358 — Waynetown 2 . 76 

359— Castleton 2.74 

860 — Hagerstown 2 . 74 

S61— Greendale 2.73. 

362— Morgantown 2.71 

363— Shererville 2,70 

364— Greenville 2.70 

365— Beech Grove 2.70 

366— Wolcottville (N) 2.67 

367— Middleburg 2.66 

368— Clermont 2.62 

369 — Greensboro 2 . 62 

370— CIdysburg 2.61 

371— Green Fork 2.59 

372— St. Joe 2.58 

373— New Middletown 2 . 58 

374— College Park 2.56 

375— Dunreith 2.56 

376— Milton 2.56 

377 — Brooksburg 2 . 55 

378— Palmyra 2.55 



Towns Levy 

379— Woodruff Place $2.54 

380— Clifford 2.54 

381— Clarksville 2.54 

382— Rossville 2.54 

383 — Millhousen 2.53 

384 — East Germantown 2.53 

S85— Osceola 2.52 

386— Broad Ripple .' 2.50 

387— Shipshewana ^. 2.49 

388 — Cedar Grove ' 2.46 

389— Rosedale 2.40 

390— Ingalls 2.39 

391— Milford 2.33 

392— Spring Grove 2.29 

393— Mt. Carmel 2.24 

394— Haubstadt 2.24 

395— St. Meinrad 2.20 

396— Wilkinson 2.20 

397— Mt. Auburn 2.08 

398— Markleville 2.02 

399— Elizabethtown 1 .90 

400 — Jonesville 1.74 



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164 Year Book 

TABLE No. 11 



Showing Assessment of Telephone, Telegraph, Express and Sleeping 

Car Companies in the State of Indiana, for the Year 1918 as Fixed 
by the State Board of Tax Commissioners. 

TELEPHONE COMPANIES 

Miles. 

Adams & Jay Telephone Co 50 

A. & G. Telephone Co 50.50 

Advance Telephone Co. of Advance. 305 

Advance Telephone Co. of St. Joseph 13 

Akers Telephone Co 219.25 

Akron Telephone Co 285 

Alamo Co-operative Telephone Co 175 

Alexandria Telephone Co 160 

AUentown Telephone Co 5.50 

Amboy Home Telephone Co 150 

American Telephone & Telegraph Co 37,296.23 

Antwerp Telephone Co 387.34 

Arcadia Telephone Co 120 

Arlington Telephone Co 368 

Aroma Farmers Telephone Co 145.50 

Art Mutual Telephone Co 13 

Attica Telephone Co 300 

Avery Co-operative Telephone Co 155.50 

Avilla Mutual Telephone Co 369.75 

Bainbridge Telephone Co 100 

Bakers Corner-Horton Telephone Co 240 

Banner Telephone Co 9 

Barton-Stacer Telephone Co 35 

Batesville Telephone Co 194 

Battle Ground Telephone Co 147.50 

Beech Grove Farmers Telephone Co 3 

Beech Valley Rural Telephone Co 4.50 

Bell Mutual Telephone Co 9 

Bellmore & Mansfield Citizens Telephone Co 80 

Bethlehem Telephone Co 9 

Big Springs Telephone Co 155 

Bippus Telephone Co 300 

Blue River Telephone Co 8 

Blue River Valley Telephone Co 29 

Blue Top Telephone Co 16 

Boone Township Telephone Co 15 

Boswell Telephone Co 271 

Brookville Telephone Co 340 

Brookville & Oldenburg Telephone Co 30 

Brownsville Telephone Co 123 

Burlington Telephone Co 117.50 

Burrows Telephone Co 151 

Butler Telephone Co 120 

Byron Telephone Co 55 

Cadwallader Telephone Co 1,325 

Camden Co-operative Telephone Co 180 

Carlisle Co-operative Telephone Co 394 

Carroll Telephone Co 239 

Carrollton Telephone Co 32 

Castleton Telephone Co.,. 15 

Cedar Line Telephone Co 15 



' Mile. 


Amount. 


$20 


$1,000 


25 


1,387 


25 


7,625 


30 


390 


30 


6,577 


35 


9,975 


6 


1,050 


20 


3,200 


20 


110 


50 


7,500 


84 


3.132,883 


30 


11,620 


75 


9,000 


18 


6,624 


30 


4,365 


20 


260 


57 


17,100 


10 


1,555 


25 


9,244 


15 


1,500 


20 


4,800 


12 


108 


15 


625 


50 


9,700 


20 


2,950 


50 


150 


40 


180 


30 


270 


15 


1.200 


30 


270 


25 


3,875 


85 


10,500 


50 


'400 


25 


725 


25 


400 


30 


450 


40 


10,840 


50 


17,000 


30 


900 


20 


2,460 


35 


4,113 


30 


4.530 


150 


18,000 


10 


550 


35 


46,375 


27 


4,860 


22 


8,668 


75 


17.925 


20 


640 


30 


525 


25 


376 



State Board Tax Commissioners 165 



Miles. 

Center Point Telephone Co 47 

Centerville Co-operative Telephone Co 200 

Central Telephone Co 18 

Central Indiana Telephone Co 200 

Central Mutual Telephone Co 224 

Central Union Telephone Co 205,312.76 

Chalmers Telephone Co 262.30 

Chandler Telephone Co 82 

Charlottesville Telephone Co 2 

Charlottesville Northern Telephone Co 5 

Cherryvale Mutual Telephone Co 9 

Chicago Telephone Co 22,709.90 

Churubusco Telephone Co 922 

Citizens Telephone Co. of Clay Co 2,122.25 

Citizens Telephone Co. of Cambridge Cit^ 1,049.75 

Citizens Telephone Co. of Columbus 3,836.10 

Citizens Telephone Co. of Decatur 376.98 

Citizens Telephone Co. of Dunkirk 550 

Citizens Telephone Co. of Edinburgh 300 

Citizens Telephone Co. of Fairmount 1,058 

Citizens Telephone Co. of Gessie. 30 

Citizens Telephone Co. of Hancock Co 56.75 

Citizens Telephone Co. of Kokomo 1,927 

Citizens Telephone Co. of Marshall 265 

Citizens Telephone Co. of Macy 296.32 

Citizens Telephone Co. of Upland 140 

Citizens Telephone Co. of White Co 160 

Citizens Telephone Co. of Zionsville 266 

Citizens Co-operative Telephone Co. of Kempton 320 

Citizens Independent Telephone Co. of Terre Haute 3,523.05 

Citizens Mutual Telephone Co. of Cortland 211 

Citizens Mutual Telephone Co. of Cory 40 

Citizens Mutual Telephone Co. of Dana 23 

Citizens Mutual Telephone Co. of Libertyville 100 

Citizens Mutual Telephone Co. of Newport 134 

Citizens Mutual Telephone Co. of St. Bernice 63 

Clarksville Telephone Co 21.50 

Clay City Telephone Co 17 

Coffman-Heller Telephone Co 8 

College Corner Telephone Co. of Greenfield 5.50 

College Corner Telephone Co. of Ohio 271 

Commercial Telephone Co 643.50 

Consolidated Telephone Co 1,872 

Converse Consolidated Telephone Co 441 

Co-operative Telephone Co 408.55 

Crown Point Telephone Co 798.55 

Cutler Co-operative Telephone Co 56.50 

Cyclone Co-operative Telephone Co 100 

Cynthianne Telephone Co 10 

Cypress Telephone Co 90 

Daleville Telephone Co 95 

Darlington Telephone Co 270 

Darmstadt Telephone Co • 75 

Decatur County Independent Telephone Co 1,639 

Deer Creek Co-operative Telephone Co 100 

Deming Telephone Co 200 

Denver Co-operative Telephone Co 62 

Disko-Laketon Telephone Co 338 

Dolan Telephone Co 8 

Dubois County Telephone Co .' 491 

Dunlaps Mutual Telephone Union 205.50 



Per Mile. 


Amount. 


50 


$2,350 


35 


7,000 


40 


720 


65 


13,000 


45 


10,080 


37 


7,596,572 


27 


7,082 


25 


2,050 


175 


350 


60 


300 


60 


540 


47 


1,067,365 


25 


23,050 


40 


84,890 


60 


62.985 


17 


65,212 


120 


45,238 


25 


13,750 


50 


15,000 


20 


21,160 


40 


1,200 


30 


1,702 


75 


144,525 


15 


3,975 


25 


7,408 


35 


4.900 


30 


4,800 


35 


9,310 


35 


11,200 


133 


468.566 


30 


6,330 


20 


800 


170 


3,910 


25 


2,500 


30 


4,020 


40 


2,520 


50 


1,075 


50 


850 


25 


200 


35 


192 


40 


10,840 


90 


57,915 


27 


50,544 


24 


10,584 


32 


13,074 


25 


19,964 


75 


4,238 


12 


1,200 


75 


750 


15 


1.350 


55 


5,225 


40 


10,800 


25 


1,875 


30 


49,170 


35 


3,500 


20 


4,000 


45 


2,790 


25 


8,450 


50 


400 


90 


44,190 


45 


9,247 



166 Year Book 



Miles. 

Eastern Indiana Telephone Co 692 . 50 

Eckhart, J. C. Telephone Co '. . . 435 

Eckerty, Branchville «& Cannelton Telephone Co 501 

Eel River Telephone Co 470 

Ekin Mutual Telephone Co 290 

Elberfeld & Millersburg Telephone Co 10 

Elizaville Co-operative Telephone Co 70 

Elnora Co-operative Telephone Co 14 

Eureka Telephone Co 741.50 

Excelsior Telephone Co 60 

Extra Telephone Co 5 

Fairbanks Mutual Telephone Co 300 

Fairview Co-operative Telephone Co 125 

Fairview & East Enterprise Telephone Co 6 

Fall Creek Telephone Co 30 

Falmouth Mutual Telephone Co 206 

Farmers Telephone Co 468 

Farmersburg Telephone Co 150 

Farmers & Citizens Telephone Co 101 

Farmers Co-operative Telephone Co. of Silver Lake 217 

Farmers Mutual Telephone Co. of Bear Branch. 49 

Farmers Mutual Telephone Co. of Columbia City 1,400 

Farmers Mutual Telephone Co. of East Enterprise. ... 30 

Farmers Mutual Telephone Co. of Millersburg 240 

Farmers Mutual Telephone Co. of Moorefield 39 

Farmers Mutual Telephone Co. of Patriot 90 

Farmers Mutual Telephone Co. of Rexville 60 

Farmers Mutual Telephone Co. of Shipshewanna 138 

Farmers Mutual Telephone Co. of Vevay 2 

Farmers Mutual Telephone Exchange 28 

Farmers Rural Telephone Co 20 

Farmers Union Telephone Co. of Borden 142 

Farmers Union Telephone Co. of Uniontown 110 

Farmers White Line Telephone Co 3 

Farmland Telephone Co 264.75 

Fishers Telephone Co 32 

Flat Rock Telephone Co 195 

Flora Telephone Co 408 

Forest Telephone Co 232 

Fortville Telephone Co 108 

Fountain Telephone Co 21 

Four Corners Mutual Telephone Co 22 

Franklin Telephone Co 245 

Fulton Telephone Co . . 180 

Garrett Telephone Co. . . 346.25 

Gaston Home Telephone Co 360 

Geneva Telephone Co 82 

German Telephone Co. of Craigville 319 

German Telephone Co. of Cumberland 13 

Germany Mutual Telephone Co 40.50 

Gilboa Telephone Co , 5 

Goldsmith Co-operative Telephone Co 200 

Greencastle Telephone Co .♦ 150 

Greencastle & Bell Union Telephone Co 12 ' 

Greene County Telephone Co 287.50 

Greenleaf Bridge Mutual Telephone Co 9.76 

Greens Fork Co-operative Telephone Co 301.50 

Greentown Telephone Co ; 185 

Hamilton Home Telephone Co 36 

Harmony Telephone Co 14 

Harrison Telephone Co 20 



Per Mile. 


Amount. 


60 


$41,550 


23 


10,005 


15 


7.515 


58 


27,260 


15 


4,350 


20 


200 


40 


2,800 


135 


1.890 


25 


18,537 


25 


1,500 


25 


125 


12 


8,600 


60 


7,500 


50 


300 


30 


900 


25 


5.150 


25 


11,700 


30 


4,500 


90 


9,090 


18 


3,906 


40 


1,960 


28 


39,200 


60 


1,800 


25 


6,000 


30 


1,170 


20 


1,800 


25 


1,500 


25 


3,450 


1,200 


2,400 


60 


1,680 


.30 


, 600 


15 


2,130 


15 


1,650 


40 


120 


32 


8,472 


50 


1,600 


25 


4,875 


37 


15,096 


25 


5,800 


80 


8,640 


700 


14,700 


30 


660 


130 


31,850 


35 


6,300 


80 


27,700 


35 


12,600 


50 


4.100 


40 


12,760 


40 


520 


33 


1,336 


60 


300 


30 


6,000 


150 


22,500 


35 


420 


40 


11,500 


40 


390 


25 


7,537 


55 


10,175 


35 


1,260 


60 


840 


40 


800 



State Board Tax Commissioners 167 



Miles. 

Harrison County Telephone Co 819 

Harrison County Farmers Telephone Co 40 

Harrison Township Telephone Co 100 

Harristown Telephone Co 26 

Hazelrigg Co-operative Telephone Co 222 

Hazelton Telephone Co 66 

Hicksville Telephone Co 46.50 

HoUansburg Home Telephone Co 70 

Home Telephone Co. (Hancock Co) 4.50 

Home Telephone Co. of Angola 1,829 

Home Telephone Co. of Bicknell ,. 450 

Home Telephone Co. of Brownstown 102 

Home Telephone Co. of Elkhart 1,600 

Home Telephone and Telegraph Co. of Ft. Wayne 1,200 

Home Telephone Co. of Noblesville 100 

Home Telephone Co. of Portland 1,161 

Home Telephone Co. of Wabash 921 

Home Telephone Co. of Warren 4 

Home Mutual Telephone Co. of Stony Point , 605.50 

Honey Creek Mutual Telephone Co 200 

Hoosier Telephone Co 733 

Hope Independent Telephone Co 288 

Hymera Telephone Co 62 

Idaville Co-operative Telephone Co 108 

Independent Telephone Co 75 

Independent Long Distance Telephone & Telegraph Co 705.50 

Independent Ten Telephone Co 22 

Indiana Telephone & Telegraph Co 1,387.50 

Indiana Union Telephone & Telegraph Co 598.25 

Indianapolis Telephone Co 50,716 

Irvine Telephone Co 50 

Jackson Township Telephone Co 150 

Jasper County Telephone Co 403 

Jefferson Co-operative Telephone Co 161.50 

Jennings County Telephone Co 159 

Johnsons Fork & Rockdale Telephone Co 43 

Kansas Telephone Co 10 

Kingman Telephone Co 247 

Kinloch Long Distance Telephone Co. of Mo 87.50 

Kirklin Telephone Co 222 

Knightstown Telephone Co 374.76 

Ladoga Telephone Co 263 

La Fayette Telephone Co. . , 15,992 

La Fontaine Telephone Co 775 

La Gro-Andrews Telephone Co 218.50 

Lancaster & Monroe Twps. Independent Telephone Co 27 

Landessville Rural Telephone Co 200 

La Porte Telephone Co 1,147.19 

Lawrence Telephone Co 49.50 

Lebanon Telephone Co 325 

Leisure Telephone Co 102 

Leiters Ford Telephone Co 101 

Lewis Telephone Co Ill 

Liberty Telephone Co 688.50 

Liberty Center Telephone Co 164.50 

Linden Telephone Co 260 

Logansport Home Telephone Co 1,925 

London Telephone Co 70 

Lost Creek Mutual Telephone Co 8.50 

Louisville Home Telephone Co 2,426.82 

Lynn Local Telephone Co 1,201.81 



Per Mile. 


Amount. 


7 


$5,733 


30 


1,200 


80 


3,000 


30 


780 


15 


3.880 


60 


3,960 


50 


2.325 


60 


4,200 


80 


360 


40 


73.160 


32 


14,400 


120 


12,240 


105 


168,000 


600 


720,000 


330 


33,000 


35 


40,635 


70 


64,470 


60 


240 


24 


14,532 


25 


5,000 


32 


23,456 


50 


14,400 


55 


3,410 


20 


2,160 


20 


1,500 


70 


49,385 


12 


264 


40 


55,500 


32 


19,144 


30 


1,521,480 


12 


600 


10 


1,500 


56 


22,568 


8 


1,292 


40 


6,360 


80 


1,290 


20 


200 


25 


6,175 


100 


8,750 


35 


7,700 


45 


16.864 


60 


15,780 


15 


239,880 


20 


15,500 


75 


16.387 


30 


810 


15 


3.000 


130 


149.134 


60 


2.970 


130 


42,250 


20 


2,040 


30 


3.030 


30 


3,330 


30 


20,655 


30 


4.935 


30 


7.800 


65 


125,125 


27 


1.890 


25 


212 


40 


97,072 


24 


28.843 



168 Year Book 

Miles. 

McCarter Telephone Co 204 

Madison Telephone Co 700 

Majenica Telephone Co 1,188.50 

Markleville Co-operative Telephone Co 10 

Martinsville Telephone Co 800.25 

Mellott Telephone Co 103 

Merchants Mutual Telephone Co. 1,363.40 

Merom Telephone Co 60 

Mexico Home Telephone Co 52.50 

Michigantown Co-operative Telephone Co 222 

Mill Creek Telephone Co... 54 

Millville Telephone Co 60 

Mitchell Telephone Co 404 

Modoc Telephone Co 400 

Mohawk Telephone Co 98 

Monroe County Telephone Co 88 

Monroe Telephone System 69 

Monroeville Home Telephone Co 1,500 

Monrovia Mutual Telephone Co .^. 50 

Monticello Telephone Co 298 

Montmorenci Telephone Co 115 

Moreland Rural Telephone Co 250 

Moores Hill Telephone Co 100 

Mooresville Telephone Co 191 

Morgantown Telephone Co 251 

Morrison, S. Telephone Co 649 

Mt. Comfort Telephone Co 28 

Mt. Lebanon Telephone Co 7.50 

Mt. Summit Rural Telephone Co 60 

Mt. Zion Telephone Co 144 

Mutual Telephone Co 86 

Napoleon Telephone Co : 32 

Nappanee Telephone Co 672.02 

Needmore Telephone Co 73 

New Eden Telephone Co 50 

New Home Telephone Co 1,236.77 

New Lebanon Mutual Telephone Co 80 

New Lisbon Telephone Co 98 

New Market Co-operative Telephone Co 150 

New Palestine Telephone Co 42 

New Paris Mutual Telephone Co 52 

New Richmond Co-operative Telephone Co 215 

New Salem Telephone Co 120 

New Washington Telephone Co 205 

New Winchester Farmers Mutual Telephone Co 75 

Newton & Jasper Counties Telephone Co 240 

Newtown Telephone Co 114 

Nine Mile Telephone Co 80 

Noble County Telephone Co 604 

Noblesville & Ohio Telephone Co 10 

Northern Ind. & Southern Mich. Tel., Tel. & Cable Co 1,874.30 

North Manchester Telephone Co 249 

North Vernon & Vernon Telephone Co 220 

Northwestern Indiana Telephone Co. . . 597 

Oakland City Telephone Co 170 

Oaklandon Rural Telephone Co 4 

Oaklandon Western Telephone Co 8 

Ohio River Telephone Co 767 

Ohio State Telephone Co 86 

Orange Mutual Telephone Co 185 

Oregtes Telephone Co , , , 77 



Per Mile. 


Amount. 


15 


$3,060 


60 


42.000 


17 


20,204 


100 


1,000 


70 


21,017 


40 


4,120 


70 


95.438 


40 


2,400 


32 


1,680 


20 


4,440 


20 . 


1,080 


40 


2,400 


40 


16.160 


25 


10.000 


25 


2,450 


40 


3,520 


80 


5.520 


16 


24.000 


70 


3,500 


90 


26.820 


35 


4,025 


30 


7.500 


20 


2.000 


70 


13,370 


28 


7,028 


40 


25,960 


40 


1,120 


40 


300 


20 


1,200 


50 


7,200 


30 


1,080 


15 


480 


30 


20.161 


20 


1.460 


50 


2,500 


50 


61.838 


25 


2.000 


60 


5.880 


30 


4,500 


70 


2,940 


100 


5.200 


30 


6.450 


25 


3,000 


30 


6,150 


12 


900 


45 


10,800 


35 


3.990 


50 


4,000 


30 


18,120 


40 


400 


30 


56,229 


25 


6,225 


40 


8,800 


150 


89.550 


50 


8.500 


30 


120 


70 


560 


40 


30.680 


100 


8.600 


25 


4.625 


80 


■ 2.310 



State Board Tax Commissioners 169 

Miles. Per Mile. Amount. 

Osgood Telephone Co 90 80 $7,200 

Otterbein Telephone Co 212 50 10,600 

Otter Creek Telephone Co 23 40 920 

Oxford Telephone Co 284 50 14,200 

Palmyra Independent Telephone Co 160 40 6,400 

Paris Crossing Telephone Co 88 20 1,760 

Parke County Telephone Co 1,084.49 27 29,281 

Parkersburg Telephone Co 17 60 1,020 

Pendleton Telephone Co 300 30 9,000 

Pennville Telephone Co 275 35 9,625 

Peoples Co-operative Telephone Co. of Bowers 40 35 1,400 

Peoples Co-operative Telephone Co. of Colfax 215 20 4,300 

Peoples Co-operative Telephone Co. of Jan^estown 250 27 6,750 

Peoples Co-operative Telephone Co. of Manson 369.75 8 2,958 

Peoples Co-operative Telephone Co. of Mulberry 521 20 10,420 

Peoples Mutual Telephone Asso. of La Grange 218 40 8,720 

Peoples Mutual Telephone Co. of Silver Lake 871 25 21,775 

Peoples Mutual Telephone Co. of Topeka 225 30 6.750 

Peoples Mutual Telephone Co. of Wolcottville 113 25 2,825 

Peoples Union Telephone Co 242 12 2,902 

Perkinsville & Lapel Telephone Co 102.47 20 2,049 

Perry Telephone Co 16 30 480 

Perry Hill Telephone Co 8 60 480 

Philadelphia Farmers Telephone Co 15 30 450 

Pierceton Telephone Co 232 40 9,280 

Pigeon Roost Telephone Co 8 12 96 

Pike County Telephone Co 595 , 160 95,200 

Pikes Peak Telephone Co 61 40 2,440 

Plainville Telephone Co 37 110 4,070 

Pleasant View Telephone Co 5.50 60 330 

Poland Telephone Co 61 20 1,220 

Portage Home Telephone Co 567 25 14,175 

Posey County Home Telephone Co 267 72 19,224 

Prairie Telephone Co 478 22 10.516 

Prairie Branch Telephone Co 9 20 180 

Prairie Creek Mutual Telephone Co 325 30 9,750 

Pretty Prairie Telephone Co 120 40 4.800 

Princeton Telephone Co 300 100 30,000 

Providence Telephone Co 155 35 5,425 

Public Service Telephone Co 328.87 50 16.443 

Putnam County Telephone Co 72 50 3,600 

Range Line Telephone Co 5 50 250 

Red Key Telephone Co 418.25 25 10,456 

Rees Mills Co-operative Telephone Co 295 12 3.540 

Richmond Home Telephone Co 955 222 212,010 

Ridgeville Telephone Co 338 25 8,450 

Ripley Farmers Co-operative Telephone Co 678 25 16,950 

Roachdale Telephone Co 171 50 8,550 

Roann Telephone Co 391 30 11,730 

Roanoke Telephone Co 390 25 9,750 

Rochester Telephone Co 1,803.95 22 39,686 

Rockfield Co-operative Telephone Co 102 20 2,040 

Rosedale Mutual Telephone Co 60 150 9,000 

Rossville Home Telephone Co 255 40 10,200 

Royal Telephone Co 488 27 13,122 

Royal Center Telephone Co 138 45 6,210 

Rushville Co-operative Telephone Co 480.50 100 48,050 

Russiaville Co-operative Telephone Co ' 200 25 5,000 

Salamonia Telephone Co 300 18 5.400 

Salem Co-operative Telephone Co 152 15 2,280 

Sand Bank Telephone Co 72 30 2.160 



170 Year Book 

Sanford Mutual Telephone Co 21 .50 

Scircleville Telephone Co 215.75 

Scott County Telephone Co 241.75 

Seymour Mutual Telephone Co 251 

Shady Grove Telephone Co 4.50 

Shannondale Co-operative Telephone Co 130 

Sharpesville Telephone Co 315 

Shawnee Telephone Co .'. . . 376 

Shiloh Farmers Telephone Co 7 

Shirley Telephone Co. 175 

Shoals & Dubois Telephone Co 14.75 

Shoals, Indian Springs & Bedford Telephone Co 60 

Sidney Telephone Co 214 

Sims Co-operative Telephone Co 177 

Six Mile Telephone Co 3.50 

South Raub Co-operative Telephone Co 200 

Southern Telephone Co. of Indiana 48,933.67 

Southern Indiana Telephone Co. of Aurora 352.50 

Southern Indiana Telephone Co. of McCutchanville 185 

Southern Michigan Telephone Co 7 

South Side Telephone Co 60 

Sparta & Hogan Mutual Telephone Co 19 

Spiceland Co-operative Telephone Co .-. 258 

Springport Rural Telephone Co 96 

Spurgeon Home Telephone Co 114 

Stanford Telephone Co 15 

Stansbury Mutual Telephone Co, 6 

Star Telephone Co. of French Lick 217 ' 

Star Telephone Co. of Geneva 51 

Star Line Telephone Co 7.25 

Star City Telephone Co 164.50 

Stendal Home Telephone Co 160 

Stotts Creek Telephone Co 8 

Sullivan Telephone Co 943.50 

Sulphur Spring Co-operative Telephone Co 90 

Summitville Telephone Co 168.45 

Swayzee Co-operative Telephone Co 170 

Sweetser Rural Telephone Co 551 

Syracuse Home Telephone Co 385 

Talma Telephone Co 65 

Taylorville Telephone Co 60 

Terhune Co-operative Telephone Co 147 

Thorntown Telephone Co 550 

Tilden Mutual Telephone Co 26 

Tipton Telephone Co 1,386 

Tobinsport Telephone Co 60 

Tocsin Telephone Co 68 

Turman Township Telephone Co 480 

Twelve Mile Telephone Co 90 

Union Telephone Co. of Carmel 162 

Union Telephone Co. of Riley , 150 

Union City Telephone Co 657 

Union Home Telephone Co 38 

Uniondale Rural Telephone Co 273 

Unionville Telephone Exchange 12 

United Telephone Co 5,851.40 

Urbana Independent Telephone Co 141 , 

Veedersburg Telephone Co 445 

Velpen Home Telephone Co •. . . 85 

Vernon Township Farmers Telephone Co 28 

Vevay, Mt. Sterling & Sugar Branch Telephone Co 75 

Waldron Telephone Exchange 182 



80 


$1,720 


30' 


6.472 


25 


6,033 


150 


37,650 


20 


180 


25 


3,250 


30 


9,450 


17 


6,392 


30 


210 


35 


6,125 


30 


442 


40 


2,400 


30 


6.420 


30 


5,310 


40 


140 


14 


2.800 


21 


1,027,606 


130 


45,825 


30 


5.550 


30 


210 


30 


1,800 


30 


570 


40 


11,320 


20 


1,920 


20 


2,280 


60 


900 


60 


360 


40 


8,680 


20 


1,020 


40 


290 


50 


8,225 


15 


2.400 


60 


480 


45 


42.457 


40 


3.600 


35 


5,895 


80 


13,600 


20 


11,020 


30 


11,550 


60 


8,900 


60 


3,600 


20 


2,940 


20 


11,000 


35 


910 


27 


37,422 


15 


900 


30 


2,040 


12 


5.760 


40 


8,600 


50 


8.100 


30 


4.500 


65 


42.705 


80 


8.040 


25 


6.825 


60 


720 


60 


851,084 


40 


5,640 


25 


11.125 


40 


1,400 


30 


840 


20 


1.500 


35 


6.370 



State Board Tax Commissioners 171 

Miles. Per Mile. Amount. 

Walkerton Telephone Co 283.25 40 $11,330 

Warren Telephone Co 324.75 50 16,237 

Warrington Telephone Co 20 60 1,200 

Warrington & Markleville Telephone Co 26 30 7/^C 

Waupecong Home Telephone Co 11 30 330 

Waveland Telephone Co 100 40 4,000 

Western Grove Telephone Co 9.75 60 585 

Westland Telephone Co 10.50 60 630 

West Fork & Sulphur Home Telephone Co 46 30 1.380 

West Newton Telephone Co 240 40 9,600 

West Point Co-operative Telephone Co Ill 60 6,660 

Wheatland Independent Telephone Co 60 70 4,200 

Whippoorwill Telephone Co y 91 50 4.550 

Whiteland Telephone Co 346.50 35 12.128 

White River Valley Telephone Co 109 45 4,905 

White Star Telephone Co 240 35 8,400 

Whitestown Citizens Telephone Co 161 60 9,660 

Whitesville Co-operative Telephone Co 75 35 2,625 

Whitley County Telephone Co 1,170 50 58,500 

Wilkinson, Simmons & Woods Telephone Co 7 60 420 

Wilkinson Switchboard & Telephone Co 60 40 2,400 

Williams County telephone Co 92.50 30 2,775 

Willshire Telephone Co 51 60 3,060 

Winona Telephone Co 1,817 60 109,020 

Yeoman Telephone Co 145 20 2,900 

Zenas Independent Telephone Co 95 35 3,325 

Total $21,251,268 

TELEGRAPH COMPANIES 

Fort Wayne Postal Telegraph Co '. 44 $455 $20,020 

Postal Telegraph Cable Co. of Indiana 11,081 .87 45 498,684 

Western Union Telegraph Co 53,240.87 66 3,513,897 

Total $4,032,601 

SLEEPING CAR COMPANY 

Pullman Co 3,972.30 $353 $1,402,222 

Total $1,402,222 

EXPRESS COMPANIES 

Adams Express Co 2,366.33 $218 $515,861 

American Express Co 2,838 . 73 120 340.648 

National Express Co 402.82 100 40.282 

Southern Express Co 246.72 90 22.205' 

Wells Fargo & Co 2.665.18 120 319.822 

Total , $1,238,818 



172 Year Book 



TABLE No. 12 



Final Assessments in Indiana of Pipe Line Companies Having Lines Ex- 
tending Into More Than One County, as Made by the State Board 
of Tax Commissioners in 1918. (These Assessments Are Exclusive 
of Real Estate, Buildings, Machinery, Wells, etc. — All of Which Are 
Subject to Local Taxation.) 

Names of Companies. Assessment. 

Batesville Gas Co $9,690 

Blue River Natural Gas Co 1,232 

Cambridge Natural Gas Co 20,563 

Central Indiana Gas Co • 499,110 

Charlottesville Natural Gas Co 1,300 

Citizens Natural Gas, Oil & Water Co 36,350 

Fuel Gas Co. of Indiana 12,344 

Illinois Pipe Line Co 5,377,708 

Indiana Gas Light Co. 121,117 

Indiana Gas Transportation Co 150,945 

Indiana Natural Gas & Oil Co 521,180 

Indiana Pipe Line Co 5,051,365 

Interstate Public Service Co 14,720 

Knightstown Natural Gas & Fuel Co 4,800 

Logan Natural Gas & Fuel Co 901,045 

Rushville Natural Gas Co 30,974 

Springport & Mt. Summit Gas Co 2,608 

Tide Water Pipe Co 1,306,402 

Union Heat, Light & Power Co 46,982 



Total ,.,,,.,,.,,,, , : r r r r ■ $14,110,435 



State Board Tax Commissioners 173 

TABLE No. 13 



Final Assessments in Indiana of Transportation Companies, as Valued 
by the State Board of Tax Commissioners in 1918. These Assess- 
ments are Subject to an Excise Tax of One Per Cent, and Payable 
to the Auditor of State in the Month of November. 

Names of Companies. Assessment. 

Aetna Explosive Co $10,000 

American Agricultural Chemical Co 1,500 

'American Cotton Oil Co .\ 17,200 

American Linseed Co 7,200 

American Refrigerator Transit Co 46,200 

American Tar Products Co 3,500 

Armour & Co 76,800 

Arms Palace Horse Car Co 2,000 

Barrett Co , 21,000 

Beaver Refining Co 1,500 

Capitol Refining Co 3,200 

Cedar Rapids Refrigerator Line 17,000 

Chicago, New York & Boston Refrigerator Co 10,300 

Cincinnati Refrigerator Express 1,000 

Cleveland Provision Car Co 500 

Contact Process Co •. 1,500 

Crescent Tank Line (General Chemical Co., Owner) 25,000 

Cruikshank Brothers Co /. . . . 500 

Crystal Car Line 14,000 

Cudahy, Milwaukee Refrigerator Co 22,000 

Cudahy Packing Co 9,000 

Dold Refrigerator Car Line 7,000 

Doud Stock Car Co 2,000 

DuPont, E. I. DeNemours & Co 4,000 

Eastern Live Stock Exchange Co 4,000 

Express Car Line 1,000 

Fleischman Transportation Co 10,000 

Fruit Growers Express (Inc.) 130,000 

General American Tank Car Corporation 40,000 

General Electric Co. 600 

Globe Soap Co 2,000 

Graver Tank Works, Wm 600 

Gulf Refining Co 1,800 

Hammond, Standish Co 500 

Hegeler Zinc Co 20,000 

Heinz, H. J. Co 7,000 

Hyman Pickle Co 1,500 

Indian Refining Co 150,000 

Indianapolis Abattoir Co 3,000 

Indianapolis Refrigerator Express 5,000 

Jap Rose Tank Line 900 

Kansas Oil Refining Co 7,000 

Kerns Live Stock Express 1,500 

Kingan Refrigerator Line 60,000 

Larkin Co 2,000 

Lemac Carriers Co 6,000 

Libby, McNeill & Libby (Refgr. Line) 2,000 

Liquids Despatch Line 5,000 

Live Poultry Transit Co • 6,000 

Louisville Soap Co. of New Jersey 6,000 

Lutz & Schramm Co 600 



174 



Year Book 



Names of Companies. Assessment. 

Mather Stock Car Co f $20,000 

Matthiessen & Hegeler Zinc Co , 3,500 

Marsh Refrigerator Service Co 8,000 

Mineral Point Zinc Co 18,000 

Missouri River Despatch Co 10,000 

Morrell Refrigerator Car Co 15,000 

Morris & Co. Refgr. & Tank Lines 35,000 

National Petroleum Co — 

Canfield Tank Line Co 4,000 

Conewango Refining Co 1,500 

Cornplanter Refining Division, The Ohio Cities Gas Co 2,500 

Crew Levick Co 2,000 

Crystal Oil Works 300 

Emlenton Refining Co 3,500 

Empire Oil Works 8,000 

Germania Refining Co 1,200 

Independent Refining Co 4,000 

Island Petroleum Co 2,000 

National Pipe Line Co 1,200 

Paragon Refining Co 5,000 

Pure Oil Co 1,000 

Seneca Oil Works 3,000 

Superior Oil Works (Ltd) 1,000 

Union Petroleum Co 5,000 

Warren Refining Co 2,500 

Waverly Oil Works Co 2,500 

Pacific Fruit Express 125,000 

Philadelphia Quartz Co 4,000 

Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co 300 

Pittsburgh Provision & Packing Co 300 

Proctor & Gamble Transportation Co 35,000 

Penn American Refining Co 1,200 

Prudential Oil Corporation 500 

Republic Creosoting Co 3,500 

Santa Fe Refrigerator Despatch Co. 80,000 

St. Louis Independent Packing Co 4,000 

St. Louis Refrigerator Car Co 60,000 

Semet-Solvay Co 10,000 

Silurian Spring Co 1,000 

Southern Cotton Oil Co 3,000 

Spencer, Kellogg & Sons (Inc.) 8,000 

Squire Dingee Co 2,000 

Streets Company 12,000 

Swifts Refrigerator Transportation L-o 75,000 

Swifts Live Stock Transportation Co 10,000 

Titusville Oil Works. 6,000 

Toledo Seed & Oil Co 2,000 

The Texas Co 50,000 

Union Refrigerator Transit Co 32,000 

Union Tank Line Co 400,000 

Valvoline Oil Works (Ltd.) 2,000 

Wetsern Heater Despatch Co 10,000 

Western Live Stock Express Co 12,000 

White City Refrigerator Despatch 4,500 

Wilburine Oil Works 8,000 

Wilson Car Lines 25,000 

Wood Products Co 4,000 

Total ,.$1,927,900 



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(175) 



REPORT OF ATTORNEY-GENERAL'S OFFICE 



(For fiscal year beginning October 1, 1917, and ending September 80, 

1918.) 

REGISTER OF DEPARTMENT OF LAW 

ELE STANSBURY, Attorney-General. 

U. S. LESH, Assistant Attorney-General. 

ELMER E. HASTINGS, First Deputy, January 1, 1916 to 

September 1, 1918. 
EDWARD M. WHITE, First Deputy, September 1, 1918 to 

December 31, 1918. 
DALE F. STANSBURY, Second Deputy. 
JOHN G. McCORD, Traveling Deputy. 
HARRIETTE HARRIS, Stenographer and Clerk. 
MABEL STINE, Stenographer. 

The office of Attorney-General was created by an act of the Legisla- 
ture, approved February 1, 1855. This law provided that the office of 
Attorney- General should be filled by the qualified voters of the State. 
The interim between the passage of the law and the first general election 
was filled by an election of the General Assembly, and accordingly James 
Morrison, on the 5th day of March, 1855, became Attorney-General. At 
the October election for the year 1857, Hon. Joseph McDonald was elected 
Attorney-General by the qualified voters of the State. 

Since then this office has been filled by the following persons : 

Joseph E. McDonald, from December 17, 1856. 
James G. Jones, from December 17, 1859 (died). 
John P. Usher (appointed), from November 10, 1861 (resigned). 
John F. Kibby (appointed), from March 19, 1862. 
Oscar B. Hord, from November 3, 1862. 
Delana E. Williamson, from November 3, 1864. 
Bayless W. Hanna, from November 3, 1870. 
James C. Denny, from November 6, 1872. 
Clarence A. Buskirk, from November 6, 1874. 
Thomas W. Woollen, from November 6, 1878. 
Daniel P. Baldwin, from November 6, 1880. 
Francis T. Hord, from 1882 to 1886. 
Louis T. Michener, from 1886 to 1890. 
Alonzo G. Smith, from 1890 to 1894. 
. William A. Ketcham, from 1894 to 1898. 
William L. Taylor, from 1898 to 1903. 
Charles W. Miller, from 1903 to 1907. 
James Bingham, from 1907 to 1911. 
Thomas M. Honan, from 1911 to 1915. 

Richard M. Milburn, from January 1, 1915, to November 9, 1915. 
Evan B. Stotsenburg, from November 11, 1915 to January 1, 1917. 
Ele Stansbury, from January 1, 1917 to . 

(176) 



Attorney- General 177 

As already stated, it is provided in the law creating the office that 
the Attorney- General shall be elected by the qualified voters of the State, 
and his duties and powers being prescribed by law, it is not difficult to 
comprehend the purpose for which the office was created. The necessity 
for its creation is found in the condition of affairs existing in this State 
prior to the passage of the act of February 27, 1855, when the legal af- 
fairs of the State were managed by a prosecuting attorney or by those 
specially employed for that purpose, as the occasion for such employment 
arose. It was a system that had grown up under the Constitution of 
1816, suited, perhaps, to the age of the State, its population and partial 
and somewhat indifferent development, but wholly inadequate for our 
present advanced condition of civilization. 

The act of March 5, 1889, cast^ the responsibility of prosecuting and • 
defending all suits instituted by or against the State of Indiana upon 
the Attorney- General; and in all cases where the prosecution or defense 
of any case has not been provided for by law, and the interest of the 
State is involved therein, he may be required by the Governor or a ma- 
jority of the State officers to appear and prosecute or defend all such 
suits. And it is made the duty of the Attorney-General to represent the 
State in all criminal cases in the Supreme or Appellate Courts, and to 
defend all suits brought against the State officers. 

The General Assembly of 1917 abolished the positions of attorney 
for the Public Service Commission, the State Board of Accounts and the 
State Board of Tax Commissioners, for which services the State had 
been paying $11,300, and it was made the duty of the Attorney- General 
to bring suits upon all claims against public officers and on their bonds 
presented by the State Board of Accounts; to conduct all litigation and 
suits brought by the Public Service Commission and all the legal matters 
including litigation on behalf of the State Board of Tax Commissioners, 
also to legally advise said commissions and boards. In fact it is the duty 
of the Attorney- General to conduct every species of litigation to protect 
the rights and interests of the State and the people wherever the services 
of an attorney are required. 

It is also the duty of the Attorney- General to appear in all suits 
where the interests of all of the people of the whole State are involved, 
especially, when pending in the Supreme or Appellate Courts, whatever 
may be the style of the controversy. Several very important cases of 
that character have appeared during the term of the present incumbent. 
Among these were the suits involving the validity of the State Highway 
Law, the Woman's Suffrage Act, the act providing for a Constitutional 
Convention, the Prohibition Act of 1917, and also the case of Otho Poer 
V. State of Indiana, ex rel. Arthur M. Hinshaw, which involves the 
integrity and the stability of the public school system. 

The Prohibition Act passed by the General Assembly of 1917 imposed 
upon the Attorney-General the duty of enforcing that law in counties 
where the local officers fail or refuse to do their duty. It is very ap- 
parent in the light of the few weeks' experience since the Supreme Court 
sustained the validity of that law that the Attorney-General's depart- 
ment will find a great amount of work to do, not so much on account of 
che unwillingness of the local authorities to enforce the law, but because 

12—13956 



178 Year Book 

of their inability owing to local conditions to enforce it. The General 
Assembly which enacted that law failed to provide an appropriation or 
additional assistance to this department for that work, but the Legis- 
lature of 1919 evidently will give it proper consideration. 

SECRETARY OF STATE 

All questions arising in the office of the Secretary of State, relating to 
the formation of corporations under the laws of this State, or the ad- 
mission of foreign corporations to do business in this State; the limita- 
tions within which the corporate activities must be restricted, the manner 
in which they may be held within the proper scope of their business 
activites as well as the amount of fees and taxes which must be paid 
for such privileges, are submitted to the Attorney-General and upon his 
counsel and advice these questions are disposed of. 

In addition to questions of this character, many others of a miscel- 
laneous character relating to the proper conduct of said office arise from 
time to time and are submitted to this office for solution. 

AUDITOR OP STATE 

In the office of the Auditor of State many questions arise relating to 
the organization of banks and trust companies and the manner in which 
they may conduct the banking and trust company business within the 
law; the organization of insurance companies and the manner in which 
this business must be conducted under the law. These questions are sub- 
mitted to the Attorney-General for formal opinions. 

In addition to these departments the Attorney- General is called upon 
to advise the State Treasurer, the State Superintendent of Public In- 
struction, the State Veterinarian, the State Geologist, the State Statis- 
tician and the various heads of the State Penal and Benevolent Institu- 
tions, as well as all other branches of the state government in connection 
with the conduct of their official duties. 

OFFICIAL OPINIONS RENDERED SINCE OCTOBER 1, 1917 

As Attorney-General I have rendered one hundred fifty-six: opin- 
ions upon questions of law to state officers, heads of institutions and 
such officers as are entitled to such opinions. In addition thereto, I have 
advised the several officers upon many occasions. 

In rendering these opinions, it must be understood that this depart- 
ment is without briefs or argument, and in that respect is unlike the 
Supreme and Appellate Courts. The opinions are generally asked for 
by men who have a very good understanding of the law affecting their 
particular offices, and only such questions reach this department as are 
too complicated for the officers themselves to determine. 

The official opinions rendered are of record in this office, where they 
can be seen by anyone desiring to make use of them. 

SOME OF THE MORE IMPORTANT CASES HANDLED DURING 

THE YEAR 

While the statute defining the duties of the Attorney- General requires 
him to give his legal opinion to either house of the General Assembly on 



Attorney-General 179 

the constitutionality of any proposed law, whenever required so to do by 
resolution of such house, yet seldom, if at all, has either branch of the 
legislative body seen fit to avail itself of this privilege, and therefore, 
it so happens that the Attorney-General is frequently called upon to 
defend the constitutional validity of statutory enactments on account of 
infirmities for which he has assumed no responsibility. 

The failure of the legislative body to avail itself of the privilege re- 
ferred to, perhaps largely arises out of the fact that it usually contains 
in its own membership, lawyers of recognized ability, but, under the 
pressure of the legislative business, it would seem obvious that these 
members would not find sufficient^ time to make those careful investiga- 
tions which should precede the expression of opinions upon such im- 
portant questions. 

The last session of the General Assembly enacted several important 
measures which have been the subject of litigation during the year. 

THE CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION CASE 

In the casfe of Bennett v. Jackson, Secretary of State, the validity 
of the act providing for a constitutional convention was brought into 
question, and after an exhaustive presentation of the authorities by way 
of written briefs, supplemented by oral arguments, the Supreme Court 
held that under the limitations contained in our present state constitu- 
tion, it was not competent for the Legislature to call a constitutional 
convention without first submitting the question to the electors of the 
State and obtaining a verbal expression from them at the polls. This 
casejs reported in 116 N. E. p. 921. 

WOMAN SUFFRAGE CASE 

, In the case of Knight v. Board of Election Commissioners, the validity 
of the Partial Woman's Suffrage Act was assailed. This act assumed 
to give women the right to vote for officers other than those who were 
candidates for offices created by the constitution, in other words, for 
the so-called statutory and municipal officers. But the Supreme Court, 
in deciding the case, held that under the limitations of our constitu- 
tion, it was not competent for the Legislature to extend the right of fran- 
chise to women as it would relate to statutory offices other than per- 
haps school offices, and, therefore, the enactment in question was void. 
This case is reported in 117 N. E. 565. 

STATE EX REL. V. SUN INSURANCE OFFICE ET AL 

This was an action brought in the Marion Superior Court, Room 4, 
seeking to hold various insurance companies in contempt of court for 
violating an injunction against maintaining a combination to control the 
insurance business in this State. While the court held that no contempt 
had been committed, the investigations made, and disclosed by the evi- 
dence, revealed a situation which ought to be dealt with by supplement- 
ary legislation. It appeared from the evidence in the case, which was 
not disputed, that practically all of the stock companies engaged in 
writing fire and tornado insurance in this State have formed a close com- 



180 Year Book 

bination to control rates and other conditions upon which insurance it^ 
written. In order to carry out their combination they have established 
a so-called inspection bureau, under the operations of which the various 
properties are arbitrarily rated by the inspection bureau, under the di- 
rection of a single man. In order to force all of the allied companies to 
write at the estimated rates, the combination has also established an 
auditing bureau, whereby they require all the local agents to send their 
daily reports of insurance written through the auditing department, and 
whenever it appears that a policy has been written at a rate less than 
that prescribed by the inspection bureau, this fact is reported by the 
auditing department to the company in question, and the company is 
thereupon required to obtain the full rate or cancel the policy. 

If the statute against trusts and combinations were to be so amended 
as to specifically include insurance, there would be but little difficulty 
encountered in efforts to break up this combination, and it is to be hoped 
that the coming session of the General Assembly will, in some appropri- 
ate way, provide a more efficient remedy on the subject. 

THE CASE OF MOORE OIL COMPANY V. CALDWELL, SUPERVISOR OF OIL 

INSPECTION 

The original suit was brought against Behymer as State Super- 
visor of Oil Inspection, and upon his resignation, and by successive 
resignations in office, Caldwell was finally substituted as defendant. The 
action assailed the validity of the Oil Inspection Act of 1901 on the 
ground that the provisions in said act, requiring the collection of fees in 
excess of the amount required to maintain the inspection department, 
and placing said excess in the state treasury, violated the provisions of 
the federal constitution against imposing unlawful burdens on inter- 
state commerce. From the decision of the Federal District Court, an 
appeal has been taken to the Supreme Court of the United States where 
the cause is now pending. In the meantime, a number of other cases 
incident to and growing out of the oil inspection department have en- 
tailed a great deal of labor, and there is, on account of the various de- 
cisions made and causes pending, a great deal of confusion in the oil 
inspection laws. This matter will doubtless be clarified by supplemental 
legislation at the coming session. 

WESTERN UNION TELEGRAPH COMPANY V. KLAUSS, AUDITOR OF STATE 

This was an action brought to restrain the State Auditor from certi- 
fying to the various counties of the State the assessments of the State 
Tax Board against the Western Union Telegraph Company. A tem- 
porary restraining order was issued, but thereafter, upon motion, was 
dissolved. Following this, the question arose as to the right of the com- 
pany to pay the taxes due without penalty and, upon the strength of an 
opinion by the Attorney-General, the Western Union was required to 
and did pay penalties aggregating about $50,000. 

INDIANAPOLIS TRACTON AND TERMINAL COMPANY V. PUBLIC SERVICE 

COMMISSION 

This was an action to compel the Public Service Commission to con- 
sider the! petition of the Traction Company for an increase of rates in 



Attorney-General 181 

excess of the rates prescribed in a certain franchise contract entered into 
between the Traction Company and the city of Indianapolis. The ques- 
tion was presented as to whether the Commission had the power to 
authorize an increase in excess of the rates prescribed in the contract. 
The Marion Circuit Court held that to grant such an increase as against 
the consent of the city of Indianapolis, would be to impair the obligation 
of a contract, contrary to the provisions of the state and federal con- 
stitutions, but on appeal the Supreme court held that under the emer- 
gency clause of the Public Service Commission Act, an increase of rates 
in excess of those prescribed in the contract might be granted and that 
it was the duty of the Commission to consider and act upon the petition 
for an increase. The case is one of importance as bearing upon the 
franchise contracts entered into between municipalities and public service 
corporations and the right of the Public Service Commission to authorize 
and require rates at variance with those prescribed in such franchise 
contracts. This opinion is reported in 120 N. E. p. 129. 

STATE, EX REL. LEE V. PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION 

This was an action brought by Edwin M. Lee to compel the members 
of the Public Service Commission to recognize him as a member of said 
body after the Governor entered an order removing said Lee from office. 
While the action was pending undisposed of, the Governor appointed a 
successor in office, and thereupon an action was brought against said 
successor in the nature of quo warranto. 

These actions involved the question as to the authority of the Gov- 
ernor to remove a member of the Public Service Commission for cause, 
upon notice, as well as whether such power, assuming it to exist, was 
rightfully exercised in this particular case. 

The cases required a comprehensive investigation into the authorities 
relating to the subject of removal from office, and while they have not 
been finally disposed of, rulings made in joining the issues tend to in- 
dicate that the Governor acted within the scope of his authority in mak- 
ing the order of removal. 

GENERAL LEGAL MATTERS IN CONNECTION WITH THE SEVERAL DEPARTMENTS 
OF THE STATE GOVERNMENT 

As previously stated in this report, by an act of the General Assem- 
bly which took effect on the 29th day of February, 1917, it was pro- 
vided that the Attorney-General should thereafter be the legal counsel 
for the Public Service Commission, and as such he is required to prose- 
cute all cases in which the Commission may be interested; to advise the 
Commission on all legal matters arising in the discharge of their duties 
and represent the Commi^ion in all suits to which the Commission is a 
party. At the time of this enactment there were pending a large num- 
ber of cases to which the Public Service Commission was a party in the 
various courts of the State and which had, theretofore, been mainly looked 
after by the legal counsel for the Commission, the further charge of 
which was imposed upon the Attorney- General. To the cases which 
were then pending many new ones have been added. A number of these 
cases are specifically referred to in the Year Book for 1917, since the 



182 Year Book 

publication of which some twenty-five additional actions have been 
brought. 

Believing, however, that no useful purpose can be served by pre- 
senting an abstract statement of these various cases, I will merely direct 
attention to some of the important features of the subject. They are 
instituted in the various courts throughtout the State, including the 
Federal Court, and they involve questions ranging from the validity of 
city and town ordinances affecting rates for public service companies to 
the constitutional validity of statutory provisions; from the validity of 
orders relating to the furnishing of shipping facilities by a given carrier, 
to questions of freight and passenger rates affecting carriers generally. 

In one of these actions brought in the Federal Court, the validity of 
our state statute, prescribing the two cents per mile passenger fare was 
assailed, but after the hearing of the^evidence, and before the decision, 
the action of the Federal Government in taking over the railwaj^s oper- 
ated to abate further proceedings. 

In another case, brought in the Federal Court, the validity of the 
statute requiring companies furnishing street car services in the various 
municipalities of the State to grant free passage to policemen and fire- 
men, has been assailed as invading state and federal constitutional limita- 
tions. 

In another action, brought in a state court and from its decision ap- 
pealed to the Supreme Court, the validity of the contract between the 
city of Indianapolis and the Traction Company operating street cars 
over the streets in said city, was the subject of the litigation. 

While some of these numerous cases are of only local interest, as 
affecting the rights of the utilities and citizens in particular municipal- 
ities, in many instances they involve legal questions of far-reaching im- 
portance in blazing the way for the final settlement of the growing con- 
flict between public and private interests. To some of the more import- 
ant of these cases, more particular reference will hereinafter be made, 
but suffice it to here say that in order to aid the Public Service Com- 
mission and the courts in their efforts to arrive at a just settlement of 
these public questions, entails earnest and painstaking labor on the 
legal department of the state government. 

PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION CASES 

City of Muncie v. Public Service Commission and Muncie Electric Light Company. 
This was a suit to cancel an order of the Public Service Commission, fixing rates to be 
charged in the city of Muncie for furnishing heat. Trial before Judge Gauze, in the 
Delaware Circuit Court ; finding and judgment for defendants, upholding the order 
made by the Commission. 

Gratit County v. Public Service Commission. This case was tried in the Blackford 
Circuit Court. It involved the legality of an order made by the Public Service Com- 
mission, fixing passenger rates on the Indiana Union Tyaction Company's road through 
Grant County. Case briefed and argued. Still pending. 

Town of Fairmount V. Public Service Commission. Case tried in Blackford Circuit 
Court involving the legality of rates fixed by the defendant for passenger service of 
the Indiana Union Traction Company, in the town of Fairmount. Case briefed and 
argued. Still pending. 

L. E. & W. Ry. Company v. Public Service Commission in the Superior Court, Room 
3. Marion County. This was a suit to cancel an order entered by the Public Service 
Commission, requiring the L. E. & W. Ry. Company to exchange freight in car load 



Attorney- General 183 

lots with an interurban company at Michigan City, Case was tried, resulting in can- 
celing the order, and the Public Service Commission has appealed to the Supreme 
Court. Case is undisposed of. 

C. C. C. & St. L. Ry. Company v. Public Service Commission. In the Marion Cir- 
cuit Court. This was a suit to cancel an order of the Public Service Commission, re- 
fusing to permit the Railway Company to charge for disinfecting stock cars, the Com- 
mission holding that the company was compensated for such service by it increased live 
stock freight rates. After trial the court cancelled the order. 

Citizens New Telephone Company v. Public Service Commission. In the Monroe Cir- 
suit Court. In this suit plaintiff seeks to have set aside and canceled an order or re- 
fusal by the Commission (defendant) to make an order requiring the Central Union 
Telephone Company to connect its service lines with those of plaintiff and make joint 
rates for service, etc. The defendant, Commission, filed a motion to dismiss the cause, 
which is pending. 

Citizens Natural Gas, Oil and Water Company of Shelby ville v. Public Service Com- 
mission. In the Shelby Circuit Court. The plaintiff sought to cancel an order entered 
by the defendant Commission, refusing to permit it to install an artificial gas plant in 
Shelbyville because another company was serving the public, and public necessity did not 
call for installation of a competing company. Defendant secured a change of venue 
from Shelby County and the case was sent to the Rush Circuit Court. Defendant de- 
murred to the complaint and before the court ruled, plaintiff dismissed its suit. 

CRIMINAL CASES 

The following is a list and description of the criminal cases which 
have been given attention by this department since October 1, 1917. 

It must be borne in mind that when this department takes charge of 
a criminal case in the Supreme Court, it stands responsible for the work 
of other attorneys in the lower courts, and in many cases it would be 
much easier for this department if it had been in control of the cases 
from their inception. It is our duty simply to take the matter as we 
find it. However, we find it very important in a large number of cases 
to carefully investigate the proceedings and the facts and to counsel with 
attorneys and judges who were connected with the cases in the trial 
courts. 

The following criminal cases which were briefed in the attorney- 
general's office prior to October 1, 1917, have since been decided by the 
Supreme Court: 

John Krstovich v. State, No. 23,318, Lake Circuit Court. Appeal from conviction 
for employing minors in a saloon. The evidence showed that the boys were employed 
in a bowling alley operated by the appellant's bartender in the same building as oc- 
cupied by the saloon, but that appellant did not employ them, and they were not em- 
ployed in his saloon. Brief filed by Attorney-General August 22, 1917. Reversed October 
4, 1917. Lairy, J., holding evidence insufficient to warrant conviction. Report in 117 
N. E. 209. 

Masterson y. State, No. 23235, Marion Criminal Court. Appellant was convicted of 
perjury in a voluntary affidavit under Section 2376 Burns R. S. 1914. He contended that 
he should have been prosecuted under Section 2375. Brief filed by Attorney-General Sep- 
tember 8, 1917. Affirmed November 20, 1917, Spencer, C. J., holding that the prosecu- 
tion was under the proper statute. Reported 117 N. E. 645. 

Hunt V. State, No. 23319, Noble Circuit Court. Oscar Hunt appeals from an order 
of the court committing him to the Indiana State Farm under a sentence imposed five 
years previously and suspended by the court under Section 2174 Burns R. S. 1914. The 
construction and constitutionality of Section 2174 are challenged as well as the court's 
power to sentence appellant to the Penal Farm under his former jail sentence. Brief 
filed by Attorney-General July 27, 1917. Affirmed December 4, 1917, Lairy, J., holding 
that appellant having accepted the benefits of the court's order can not complain of its 
illegality. Reported 117 N. E. 856. 



184 Year Book 

Krempl v. State, No. 23325, Marion Criminal Court. Michael Krempl appealed from 
a conviction for operating a "Blind Tiger." The sufficiency of the evidence, and court's 
ruling on certain evidence are the questions involved. Brief filed by Attorney-General 
August 17, 1917. Affirmed December 11, 1917, Spencer, J., holding the evidence suf- 
ficient. Reported 117 N. E. 929. 

Dugan v. State, No. 23326, Marion Criminal Court. Michael Dugan appealed from a 
conviction for running and operating a "Blind Tiger." Appellant ran a licensed saloon, 
also a cafe where drinks were sold. He claims to have been within the law by requir- 
ing payment in advance for drinks sold at the cafe. Brief filed by Attorney-General 
September 8, 1917. Affirmed January 8, 1918, Lairy, J., holding the evidence sufficient 
to show sales made in cafe instead of barroom. Reported 118 N. E. 307. 

Barry v. State, No. 23333, Marion Criminal Court. The question arising in this 
case is similar to that in Dugan v. State. Brief filed by Attorney-General August 29, 
1917. Affirmed January 10, 1918. Myers, J. 

State V. O'Dell, Sullivan Circuit Court. Appealed by the State from an acquittal of 
Benjamin O'Dell for violation of the compulsory education law. Briefs filed by Attorney- 
General May 28, 1917, and July 26, 1917. Appeal sustained January 30, 1918. Spencer, 
C. J., holding that the compulsory education law applies to high schools as well as ele- 
mentary schools. Reported 118 N. E. 529. 

State v. Wiggam, No. 23167, Marion Criminal Court. This was a prosecution under 
Section 10435 Burns R. S. 1914, for fraudulent use of milk bottles bearing the trade 
mark of a rival concern. Appealed by the State from a ruling of the court sustaining 
appellant's motion to quash the affidavit on the ground that the act on which the prose- 
cution was based was unconstitutional. Briefs filed by Attorney-General December 20, 

1916, and March 23, 1917. Affirmed February 19, 1918, Townsend, J., holding the act 
in question to be a local and special law and unconstitutional. Reported 118 N. E. 684. 

King v. State, No. 23312, Lawrence Circuit Court. Van King appealed from a con- 
viction for voluntary manslaughter. The point involved is the sufficiency of the evi- 
dence. Brief filed by Attorney-General August 17, 1917. Affirmed March 1, 1918, Myers, 
J., holding the evidence sufficient. Reported 118 N. E. 809. 

State V. House, No. 23238, Knox Circuit Court. Appeal by the State from a judg- 
ment acquitting James M. House of the crime of misconduct in office as Mayor of Vin-- 
cennes. The principal question is on the regularity of the selection of the jury. Briefs 
filed by Attorney-General May 2, 1917, and July 23, 1917. Affirmed on rehearing April 
25, 1918, Myers, J., holding that the ruling of the trial "court on the challenge will be 
presumed correct in the absence of a contrary showing. 

Torphy v. State, No. 23325, Washington Circuit Court. Appeal from a conviction for 
operating a "Blind Tiger." The indictment contained a statement of a former con- 
viction for a similar offense, and the rulings of the court on this question form the 
principal point on appeal. Brief filed by Attorney-General October 11, 1917. Reversed, 
January 16, 1918, Spencer, C. J., holding that appellant's motion to strike out the ob- 
jectionable portion of the indictment should have been sustained. Reported 118 N. E. 
355. 

Smith v. State, No. 23323, Lake Circuit Court. Jess Smith was convicted of larceny, 
and he appeals. The principal question on appeal is whether the allegation of owner- 
ship in a bailee is sufficient. Appellant also contends that the goods were gambling de- 
vices, and as such not subject to larceny. Brief filed by Attorney-General October 17, 

1917. Affirmed March 13, 1918, Myers, J., denying both of appellant's contentions. Re- 
ported 118 N. E. 654, L. R. A. 1918-D 688. 

Powell V. State, No. 23352, Howard Circuit Court. Appeal from conviction for co- 
habitation in adultery. Appellant contends the evidence was insufficient to show co- 
habitation, or to identify the woman or to show that she was married. Brief filed by 
Attorney-General October 20, 1917. Reversed January 17, 1918, Spencer, C. J., holding 
the evidence wholly insufficient. Reported 118 N. E. 354. 

Gaughan et al v. State, No. 23258, Marion Criminal Court. Appellants were con- 
victed of misfeasance and malconduct in the discharge of their duties as police officers. 
The principal question is whether the cities and towns act of 1905 repealed the statute 
under which they were convicted. Brief filed by Attorney-General November 13, 1917. 
Reversed, January 29, 1918, Lairy, J., holding the statute repealed by the act of 1905. 
Reported 118 N. E. 565. 

Stipp v. State, No. 23336, Delaware Circuit Court. Appeal from conviction for run- 
ning and operating a "Blind Tiger." Numerous questions are raised on this appeal, 
among which are the overruling of appellant's plea in abatement alleging the disquali- 



Attorney-General 186 

fication of a grand juror, the exclusion of appellant's wholesale liquor license, and the 
sufficiency of the evidence to convict one of appellants. Brief filed by Attorney-Gen- 
eral November 17, 1917. Reversed February 26, 1918, Spencer, C. J., holding that a 
vacancy on a grand jury caused by excusing a juror from service must be filled by call- 
ing together the jury commissioners and drawing additional names. Reported 118 N. 
E. 818. 

State v. Surety Coupon Co., No. 23373, Vigo Circuit Court. This was a prosecution 
by indictment in two counts, returned by the grand jury of Vigo County against de- 
fendant, each count being based on an act of the General Assembly of 1915, entitled 
"An Act regulating and providing for a license for the handling of trading stamps, 
coupons or other similar devices." Motion was made by defendant to quash the indict- 
ment, which was sustained, and the State appealed the case to the Supreme Court on 
the order of the court quashing the indictment. Briefs filed by Attorney-General May 
28, 1917, and July 26, 1917. Appeal sustained January 30, 1918, Spencer, C. J. 

The following criminal cases on appeal have been briefed in the At- 
torney-General's office during the fiscal year ending September 30, 1918 : 

Berry v. State, No. 23251, Floyd Circuit Court. Edward Berry appeals from a con- 
viction of murder. Numerous questions are raised by appellant, all of which concern 
the admission and exclusion of evidence. Appellee's brief filed December 8, 1917. Pend- 
ing. 

Anderson v. State, No. 23376, Grant Circuit Court. Hank Anderson was convicted 
of a violation of Section 2498, Burns R. S. 1914, for keeping a place where intoxicating 
liquors are sold, within one mile of a soldiers' home. He had been previously convicted 
of a violation of Section 8351, for keeping a place where intoxicating liquors are sold 
in violation of law ; and pleads former jeopardy. Brief filed by Attorney-General De- 
cember 1, 1917. Reversed February 8, 1918, Lairy, J., holding the former prosecution 
a bar to the latter. Reported 118 N. E. 567. 

Wheeler v. State, No. 23359, Marion Criminal Court. Charles Wheeler was con- 
victed for the murder" of James D. Hagerty, a lieutenant of police, and appeals. Several 
questions are raised, the principal one concerning the method of selecting the trial jury. 
Brief filed by Attorney-General December 15, 1917. Pending. 

Torphy v. State, No. 23349, Monroe Circuit Court. David Torphy appeals from a 
conviction of operating a "Blind Tiger" in violation of Section 8351, Burns R. S. 1914. 
The principal question is on the ruling of the trial court in compelling him to go to 
trial on the admission by the State of part of his affidavit for continuance on the ground 
of absent witnesses. Brief filed by Attorney-General December 29, 1917. Affirmed, 
June 25, 1918, Spencer, C. J., holding that under the facts shown it would not have 
been error for the trial court to have overruled appellant's motion for a* continuance. 
Reported 119 N. E. 1002. 

Munce v. State, No. 23254, Delaware Circuit Court, Hagerman Munce appeals from 
a conviction for operating a "Blind Tiger." The question presented is on the action 
of the court in overruling appellant's motion for a change of judge. Brief filed by At- 
torney-General December 29, 1917. Reversed, March 15, 1918, Myers, J., holding the 
motion and affidavit sufficient. Reported 118 N. E. 953. 

Haymond V. State, No. 23381, Delaware Circuit Court. Odbert J. Haymond appeals 
from a conviction for operating a "Blind Tiger." The principal contention is that an 
indictment was pending against appellant at the time of the filing of the affidavit upon 
which he was convicted. The sufficiency of the affiidavit and the correctness of certain 
instructions are also challenged. Brief filed by Attorney-General December 29, 1917. 
Reversed March 19, 1918, Lairy, J., holding certain instructions ' erroneous. Reported 
119 N. E. 5. 

Bills V. State, No. 23345, Johnson Circuit Court. Floyd J. Bills was convicted of the 
crime of seduction, and appeals. The principal question is as to the admissibility of 
evidence of specific acts of unchastity on the part of the prosecution. Brief filed by 
Attorney-General January 18, 1918. Affirmed May 1, 1918, Lairy, J., holding such evi- 
dence properly excluded. Reported 119 N. E. 465. 

Bleiweiss v. State, No. 23386, Marion Criminal Court, Maurice Bleiweiss appeals 
from a conviction of assault and battery. The question is on the sufficiency of the evi- 
dence. Brief filed by Attorney-General January 28, 1918. Affirmed April 25, 1918, 
Spencer, C. J. 

State V. BrumHel, No. 234407, Grant Circuit Court. Appeal by the State from a 



186 Year Book 

judgment acquitting Oscar M. Brumfiel, a county commissioner of Grant County, of the 
offense of receiving compensation in addition to his salary, in violation of Section 6102, 
Burns R. S. 1914. The principal question is on the admissibility in evidence of the 
claim presented by appellant. Briefs filed by Attorney-General January 31, 1918, and 
May 13, 1918. Pending. 

Bass V. State, No. 23378, Delaware Circuit Court. Frank Bass appeals from a con- 
viction of operating a "Blind Tiger." The question is on the admissibility of evidence 
of gambling conducted on the premises. Brief filed by Attorney-General February 23, 
1918. Pending. 

Lewis V. State, No. 23412, Marion Criminal Court. Appeal from judgment convict- 
ing Max Lewis of operating a "Blind Tiger." Brief filed by Attorney-General March 
13, 1918. Reversed May 28, 1918, Lairy, J., holding the evidence all showing the 
offense to have been committed after the filing of the affidavit. Reported 119 N. E. 720. 

Scherer v. State, No. 23362, Hamilton Circuit Court. C. B. Scherer appeals from a 
conviction of operating a "Blind Tiger." About fifteen questions are raised by appel- 
lant, dealing with the sufficiency of the affidavit, certain rulings on evidence, and the 
giving of and refusal to give instructions. Brief filed by Attorney-General March 18, 
1918. Pending. 

Solomito v. State, No. 23411, Monroe Circuit Court. Appeal by Vito Solomito from 
a conviction for operating a "Blind Tiger." The question is on the sufficiency of the 
affidavit. Brief filed by Attorney-General May 9, 1918. Pending. 

Benadum v. State, No. 23406, Delaware Circuit Court. Chas. E. Benadum appeals 
from a conviction for operating a "Blind Tiger." The question is the same as in Stipp 
V. State, No. 23336. Brief filed by Attorney-General May 15, 1918. Pending. 

Duffey v. State, No. 23383. Appeal by Patrick Duffey from a conviction for oper- 
ating a "Blind Tiger." The question raised is the same as in Stipp v. State, No. 23386. 
Brief filed by Attorney-General June 17, 1918. Pending. 

Jackson v. State, No. 23428, Lawrence Circuit Court. Ray Jackson appeals from a 
conviction for abortion. The questions attempted to be raised concern the selection of 
the grand jury, evidence of venue, and certain instructions. Brief filed by Attorney- 
General June 26, 1918. Pending. 

Arbuckle v. State, No. 23422, Shelby Circuit Court. E. O. Arbuckle, a conductor on 
the I. & C. Traction Company's line, appeals from a judgment convicting him of an 
assault and battery on W. W. Wilcoxin, a passenger, by ejecting him from the car on 
account of his refusal to pay the through rate of fare instead of the sum of two local 
rates. The question is on the legality of a rule of the traction company. Brief filed 
by Attorney-General July 17, 1918. Pending. 

Sperry & Hutchinson Company v. State, No. 23417, Decaltur Circuit Court. Appeal 
from a conviction for violating the anti-trading stamp law of 1915. The question is on 
the constitutionality of the law under which appellant was prosecuted. Brief for the 
State filed July 19, 1918. Pending. 

Gable v. State, No. 23467, Delaware Circuit Court. Edward Gable appeals from a 
conviction for operating a "Blind Tiger." Several questions are raised relating to the 
admission and exclusion of evidence and the giving and refusal to give instructions. 
Brief filed by Attorney-General August 9, 1918. Pending. 

Heier v. State, No. 23428, Marion Criminal Court. Appeal by Fred Heier from a 
conviction for operating a "Blind Tiger." Appellant contends his sentence should have 
been to the State Farm instead of the county jail. Brief filed by Attorney-General Au- 
gust 9, 1918. Pending. 

Kline v. State, No. 23451, Marion Criminal Court. Charles Kline appeals from a 
conviction for a violation of Section 8325, Burns R. S. 1914, known as the Nicholson 
Law. The question is on the suflSciency of the affidavit. Brief filed by Attorney-General 
August 13, 1918. Pending. 

Spurlin v. State, No. 23351, Marion Criminal Court. Albert Spurlin appeals from a 
conviction for assault and battery with intent to murder. Numerous questions are raised, 
mostly dealing with the refusal of the court to give certain instrutions in regard to self- 
defense. Brief filed by^ Attorney-General August 30, 1918. Pending. 

Koehler v. State, No. 23387, Allen Circuit Court. John H. Koehler appeals from a 
conviction for rape. The questions raised are on the evidence and instruction. Brief 
filed by Attorney-General September 10, 1918. Pending. 

Marco v. State, No. 23480, Daviess Circuit Court. Hyman Marco was convicted of 
receiving stolen goods, and appeals. The questions raised concern the evidence and in- 
structions. Brief filed by Attorney-General September 10, 1918. Pending. 



Attorney- General 187 

INHERITANCE TAX CASES PENDING AND DISPOSED OF SINCE 

JANUARY 1, 1918 

Matter of Estate of Jacob Baughman, deceased. Pending in Lake Circuit Court. 
Motion for reassessment filed by the State, briefed and orally argued. In this case is 
involved the right of the State to collect inheritance tax on contingent remainders. Not 
yet decided. 

Matter of Estate of Francis Krump, deceased. In the Bartholomew Circuit Court. 
Assessed inheritance tax, but allowed a deduction of $8,000 on account of an alleged 
debt. State filed motion for rehearing and it was shown the debt did not exist. The 
$8,000 was therefore taxed. 

Matter of Estate of Flora L. Sherman, deceased. In the Tippecanoe Circuit Court. 
State filed motion to retax certain property and to prevent a deduction of $2,500 as a 
debt paid to certain heirs in compromise of suit for a portion of the estate. Cause still 
undisposed of. 

Matter of A. B. Meivhinney Estate^. In this cause, which is pending in the Vigo 
Circuit Court the State seeks to have a better appraisement of decedent's property, the 
State Tax Board claiming that the property is worth nearly $200,000 instead of $103,841, 
the value shown by the appraisement made by the county assessor. The cause is still 
pending. 

Estate of John Augusburger, deceased, who died a resident of Illinois, leaving real 
estate in Howard County, Indiana. The inheritance tax was assessed in the Howard 
Circuit Court. The question involved was how to divide the total debts of decedent and 
what proportion should be deducted from the Indiana assets. The case was briefed for 
the court and oral arguments made for the State. 

Estate of Mary A. Dixon, deceased. In assessing inheritance tax in this estate, it 
was claimed by the heirs that decedent owned only a life estate in the property sought 
to be taxed. The Rush Circuit Court set the cause for hearing and the State was able 
to show that decedent owned $6,000 of the property in question and it was accordingly 
taxed. 

Estate of Claude Malley, deceased. This was a proceeding in the Vanderburgh Pro- 
bate Court to assess inheritance tax. It was claimed by the heirs that the sum of $8,000 
paid to the Federal Government under the federal inheritance tax law should be deducted 
from the amount of the estate to be taxed under the Indiana law. The cause was tried, 
fully briefed and argued and the court held the federal tax so paid was not to be de- 
ducted from the value of assessed property under the Indiana law. 

Estate of Martha F. Davis, deceased. Proceeding to collect inheritance tax in the 
Delaware Circuit Court. In this case the deceased just before her death conveyed her 
farm in Delaware County to the Board of Foreign Missions as a gift, reserving to herself 
a life estate and requiring the grantor to pay a certain annuity to a named person. The 
court assessed the inheritance tax against the grantee, it not being exempt because the 
property was not to be used in Indiana. 

Estate of F. Reid Zeigler, deceased. Proceeding in the Fountain Circuit Court to 
have inheritance tax assessed. Motion for rehearing granted. There was involved in this 
case the question as to whether taxes paid on real estate outside of Indiana could be de- 
ducted as debts in Indiana. The cause was compromised by such taxes not being al- 
lowed as deductions and the estate paid additional inheritance tax in the sum of $150. 

MISCELLANEOUS CASES 

S^ate V. Mills, et al. In the Starke Circuit Court. This is a suit to quiet plaintiff's 
title to about 75 acres of meander swamp land in Starke County claimed by the de- 
fendants. Case not disposed of. 

Jewell Smith v. McAbee et al. This case was pending at the date of my last report 
(1917), in the Marion Circuit Court. It is a suit for false imprisonment against the 
assistant state chemist. Doctor Goot, member of the State Board of Medical Examiners, 
et al. It was tried in April, 1918, before a jury and resulted in a verdict against de- 
fendants for $1,500. Defendants filed a motion for a new trial which was granted. The 
case is still pending. 

William A. Spurgeon v. Board of Review of Delaware County. In the Delaware Cir- 
cuit Court, contained in my report of 1917, was appealed to the Appellate Court by 
Spurgeon and has been fully briefed in the higher court. The case has not yet been 
decided. 



188 Year Book 

Charles McClain v. Board of Review. In the Delaware Circuit Court, contained in 
my report of 1917, was appealed to the Appellate Court by McClain and has been fully 
briefed in that court and now awaits decision. 

Robert M. House v. Lorenzo H. Wright, et al. Action brought by Robert M. House, 
a taxpayer of Hamilton County, against the members of the State Highway Commission, 
the Treasurer of State, Auditor of State, County Treasurer, County Auditor, Board of 
County Commissioners and County Council of Hamilton County to enjoin the expenditure 
of funds for the construction of a main market highway through Hamilton County under 
the provisions of the Highway Commission Law of 1917 (Acts 1917, p. 253), Plaintiff 
contends that the law violates thirteen provisions of the federal and state constitutions. 
The Hamilton Circuit Court overruled a demurrer to the complaint and issued the injunc- 
tion prayed for. An appeal was immediately taken to the Supreme Court, briefs filed 
and oral arg-ument heard, and the cause is still pending. 

The above case involves the validity of the State Highway law, which provides for 
an expenditure of about $40,000,000 in the improvement of state highways, which money 
is to be furnished by the federal government, the State of Indiana, and the people of 
the counties through which the roads are to be improved. 

Henry Schmit V. F. W. Cook Brewing Company. The above suit was brought by 
the F. W. Cook Brewing Company against the appellant, as Chief of Police of the city 
of Evansville, in the Superior Court of Vanderburgh County, to enjoin and prevent the 
defendant from enforcing the prohibition law enacted by the General Assembly of 1917. 
The law was held invalid by the Vanderburgh Superior Court, and appealed to the 
Supreme Court of Indiana, where it was carefully briefed by different attorneys and 
orally argued, but the Supreme Court held the law to be valid and not subject to any 
of the many constitutional objections made by the complaint. 



INDIANA STATE BOARD OF ACCOUNTS' CLAIMS 

Since my last report, about one hundred additional claims have been 
certified by the State Board of Accounts to the Governor and transmitted 
by the Governor to this department for prosecution. From March 7, 
1917, to October 1, 1918, said claims to the number of two hundred sev- 
enty-seven were forwarded to this department. I entered an appearance 
for the plaintiff in two cases, one in the Tippecanoe Circuit Court and 
one in the Grant Circuit Court, which had been filed by Attorney-Gen- 
eral Bingham in the year 1911. Also, I assisted a prosecuting attorney 
in compromising claims set out in five reports against two former of- 
ficials, which reports had been sent to a former prosecuting attorney 
several years ago. Of said claims, one hundred seventy-eight have 
been settled, returned to the State Board of Accounts or withdrawn by 
that department. Some were returned because an investigation showed 
that the charges were not sustained by the facts or the law, and some 
because they could not be collected out of court and the amounts due 
were so small that it was not advisable to file suits to collect same. 
Ninety-eight claims, in addition to matters in court, are now pending, 
and of these four are mostly paid. 

During the fiscal year ending September 30, 1918, I collected on said 
claims which were disposed of or partly paid the sum of five thousand 
nine hundred thirty-five and 45/100 dollars ; and there was also collected 
through court on charges in reports heretofore transmitted to this de- 
partment, upon which suits had been brought, the sum of one thousand 
two hundred ninety-nine and 80/100 dollars; making total collections of 
seven thousand two hundred thirty-five and 25/100 dollars. Suits have 
been filed by me and are now pending to collect the sum of twenty-one 



Attorney-General 189 

thousand two hundred sixteen and 75/100 dollars. Other complaints 
have been prepared which will be filed soon if settlements are not made. 

On thirteen of said pending claims agreements of settlement have 
been reached and debtors have promised to pay more than fifty-five hun- 
dred dollars in adjustment of same in the near future. It has been the 
policy of this department to get as many of said claims as possible paid 
without bringing suit. In many matters this has not been accomplished, 
and several cases, important both as to the legal questions and as to 
the amount involved, will have to be brought in various parts of the 
State as soon as the necessary investigation and work in preparing the 
complaints can be done. 

The following cases, based on charges reported by the State Board 

of Accounts, are now pending: 

\ 

The State of Indiana, on the relation of James Bingham, Attorney-General, for the 
use and benefit of the Civil and School Townships of Tippecanoe, of Tippecanoe County, 
Indiana, vs. Jesse M. Chenoweth. In Tippecanoe Circuit Court. 

The State of Indiana, on the Relation of James Bingham, Attorney-General, etc., v. 
Francis M. Hardy et al. Filed in Madison Circuit Court, but now in Grant Circuit Court, 
on change of venue. This case will probably be compromised. 

State of Indiana, on the Relation of the Civil Town of West Terre Haute, in Vigo 
County, State of Indiana, v. I.ee Miller et al. In Vigo Circuit Court. On official bond. 
Demand, $3,300. 

State of Indiana, on the Relation of the City of Indianapolis, in Marion County, 
State of Indiana, v. Dennis J. Bush et al. In Marion Circuit Court. On official bonds. 
Demand, $14,000. 

State of Indiana, on the Relation of the City of Indianapolis, in Marion County, 
State of Indiana v. Dennis J. Bush et al. In Marion Circuit Court. On official bonds. 
Demand, $8,500. 



COLLECTION OF TRANSPORTATION TAX 

On August 15, 1918, the Auditor of State certified to this department 
the names of twenty-three transportation companies operating tank cars, 
stock cars and refrigerator cars within the State of Indiana, as having 
failed to pay taxes assessed against such cars for the year 1917, under 
the provisions of Section 10223, Burns R. S. 1914. The aggregate 
amount of these taxes was $667.20, but as the individual amounts in most 
cases were small, it was deemed advisable to exhaust other means of col- 
lection before instituting suits. Correspondence was entered into with 
the various concerns, which resulted in eighteen of the companies re- 
mitting their taxes in full, amounting to $452.25, leaving $214.95 of the 
total amount still due from five companies. Suits will be brought against 
these concerns if settlements are not soon made. 

COLLECTIONS AND DISBURSEMENTS FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 

1917-1918 

COLLECTIONS 

Unclaimed estates collected and paid to the Treasurer of State $4,053 15 

Unclaimed fees collected and paid to the Treasurer of State 4,987 72 

Rent for State land collected and paid to the Treasurer of State 507 50 

$9,548 37 



190 Year Book 



DISBURSEMENTS 

Attorney-General, salary $7,500 00 

Assistant Attorney-General, salary 3,600 00 

First Deputy Attorney-General, salary 2,600 00 

Second Deputy Attorney-General, salary 2,100 00 

Traveling Deputy Attorney-General, salary 1,600 00 

Stenographer and Clerk, salary 1,080 00 

Additional stenographer, salary 867 50 

Traveling expense 382 07 

Office expense. . '. 536 76 

Law Books 374 00 

Escheated Estates and other cases 2,860 76 

Anti-trust Fund 962 88 

Total $24,463 97 



REPORT OF ADJUTANT-GENERAL 



The changes in the organization of the Indiana Guard since the last 
report have been very great as we have followed the exact recommenda- 
tions and requirements of the War Department in the organization of 
the Indiana Guard so, as far as possible, to have a well balanced organi- 
zation and have the same distributed throughout the various cities in the 
State. This has been accomplished by the earnest co-operation of all the 
members of the field and staff of the Indiana Militia. 

The Liberty Guard organization has grov/n until it now consists of 
15 regiments of approximately 200 companies, varying anywhere in 
strength from 50 to 100 members. ^ The majority of its companies have 
been uniformed and equipped at their own expense and are certainly very 
patriotic and military organizations. 

Under the direction of the Governor the duties formerly performed 
by the Quartermaster-General of the State have been performed by the 
Adjutant-General. It is the desire of the Governor to consolidate all 
branches of the military government under one head and to make the 
Adjutant-General that responsible head. 

The duties required of the Adjutant-General under the Selective Service 
Law by the Provost Marshal General have been very heavy. Hundreds 
of letters are received and answered and practically the entire Con- 
scription Department has been placed in charge of the Adjutant-General. 

During the years 1917 and 1918 many claims against the Federal 
Government for supplies furnished by the State of Indiana during the 
mobilization of the Guard for Mexican Border service, have been per- 
fected and approved by various departments of the Army. This is also 
true of claims for money advanced and paid out by the State of Indiana 
during the mobilization and mustering out of the troops, and these claims 
are now before the United States Treasury for payment. It is possible 
that some action of Congress will be necessary before this money can be 
recovered, but the claims are just and it is believed will be paid in the 
very near future. 'During this same period of time the collections in the 
Adjutant-General's Department of money due the State from various 
sources has been very satisfactory and a large amount of money turned 
over to the treasury of the State. 

The call for volunteers for the United States Army has been answered 
by the State and, population considered, Indiana today ranks first in 
voluntary enlistments in the regular army. It is estimated that the 
number of these enlistments is more than five times the quota asked of 
the State. It is believed that this same thing is true relative to the 
enlistments in the Navy. Preparations are being made in the office of 
the Adjutant- General at this time, to get a complete report and arrange 
an alphabetical index of all soldiers enlisted from the State of Indiana, 
of all men drafted into federal service under the Selective Service Act 
and of all men in the Indiana National Guard. It is believed that a 
record of this kind should be made and kept in the office of the Adjutant- 
General. 

The financial report of the Adjutant-General's Office will be compiled 
and published as required by law about January 1, 1919. 

(191) 



REPORT OF CLERK OF SUPREME AND APPELLATE 

COURTS 



OFFICE FORCE 

J. FRED FRANCE, Clerk, 

SAM L. CALLAWAY, Deputy. 

EARL L. SULT, Assistant Deputy. 

FAE A. NISLEY, Fee Clerk. 

E STELLA A. CREAGH, Stenographer and Typist. 

Z. MARGUERITE WALTER, Record Clerk. 

HISTORY AND DUTIES ' 

Shortly after the admission of the State of Indiana into the Union, 
the Legislature created the office of Clerk of the Supreme Court, which 
was, under that law, filled by appointment by the Governor. The con- 
stitution of 1851 provided that the Clerk of the Supreme Court should 
be elected for four years, and since that time the following named per- 
sons have occupied and filled this office for the terms stated, to wit: 

Wm. B. Beach 1852 to 1860 

John P. Jones 1860 to 1864 

Laz Noble 1864 to 1868 

Theodore W. McCoy 1868 to 1872 

Charles Scholl 1872 to 1876 

Gabriel Schmuck 1876 to 1880 

*Daniel Royse 1880 to 1881 

t Jonathan W. Gordon 1881 to 1882 

Simon P. Sherrin 1882 to 1886 

Wm. P. Noble 1886 to 1890 

Andrew M. Sweeney 1890 to 1894 

Alexander Hess 1894 to 1898 

Robert A. Brown • 1898 to 1907 

Edward V. Fitzpatrick 1907 to 1911 

J. Fred France 1911 to 1919 

In 1891 the Legislature created the Appellate Court, consisting of 
six judges, and since that time the Clerk of the Supreme Court has been 
ex-officio Clerk of the Appellate Court, and performs the duties of clerk 
for both courts. The work of the clerk has to do entirely with these 
two courts. Causes are appealed to both of these courts, from courts of 
lesser jurisdiction, by the filing of a transcript of the record in the clerk's 
office. The clerk then dockets the case, and thereafter all motions, peti- 
tions, briefs and submissions are filed and entered of record by the 
clerk. When the cases are ready for the court's action, they are dis- 
tributed and placed in the hands of the court in numerical order, except 
cases which are ordered placed on the advance docket by the court, and 
criminal causes, which by law are advanced. When the court hands 
down opinions, the clerk files, copies and records them, and certi- 
fies them down to the county from which they were appealed. When 
causes are finally disposed of, the record is filed away in the archives 
of the clerk's office, where they may be inspected at any time. 



♦Died. 
fAppointed. 



(192) 



Clerk Supreme and Appellate Courts 193 

Since the creation of the office of Clerk of the Supreme Court, there 
have been twenty different clerks, but during this time one, Henry 
P. Coburn, served for thirty-two years by appointment, from 1820 to 
1852. 

The Clerk of the Supreme and Appellate Court, like all other state 
officials, is now paid a fixed salary and nothing more. All fees go into 
the State Treasury. In the fiscal year closing September 30, 1918., 
there was collected by the clerk and turned into the State Treasury in 
fees the sum of $ll,186.i0. 

Besides the clerk there are five assistants selected by him. 

The salaries of the clerk and assistants are paid by the State and 
are as follows: 

Clerk \ $5,000 

Deputy 2,400 

Assistant Deputy 1,500 

Fee Clerk 1,500 

Stenographer , 900 

Record Clerk : 900 

By the constitution of the State we have five judges of the Supreme 
Court who sit continuously in the State House from October to July of 
each year. When in session, they hear oral arguments, consider evidence 
taken from the records, decide cases and write opinions. They must 
write opinions in each case they decide, because the constitution pro- 
vides that this shall be done. 

Since the creation of this court there has been filed for their dis- 
posal 23,508 cases, and of this number they have decided 23,277 cases. 
At present the court is composed of the following judges : 

Chief Justice — David A. Myers, Greensburg. 

Associate Justices — Lawson M. Harvey, Indianapolis; Moses B. Lairy, 
Logansport; Howard L. Townsend, Fort Wayne; John W. Spencer, 
Evansville. 

The term of judges of the Supreme Court is six years and they 
are elected by the people. The term of the judges of the Appellate 
Court, who are elected, is four years. This court was created to re- 
lieve the crowded and congested condition of the Supreme Court docket, 
and the court is in continuous session from October to July of each 
year. It is not a court of last resort, but in most cases their decisions 
are final because litigants proceed no further. 

Since this court was created there has been filed therein 10,429 
cases and 9,783 cases have been decided and opinions written. Al- 
though not required by law to write opinions in all cases, the court has 
pursued the policy of giving written opinions in all cases they de- 
cide. This court is now composed of the following judges: 
-Chief Justice — Frederick S. Caldwell, Winchester. 

Associate Judges — Ethan A. Dausman, Goshen; Ira C. Batman, 
Bloomington; Edward W. Felt, Greenfield; Milton B. Hottel, Salem; 
Joseph G. Ibach, Hammond. 

The office of the Clerk of the Supreme Court is located in rooms 
16 and 17 on the first floor of the State House. 

18—18956 



REPORT OF REPORTER OF SUPREME COURT 



OFFICE FORCE 

WILL H. ADAMS, Reporter. 
WILBUR G. CARPENTER, Assistant. 
CONNOR D. ROSS, Assistant. 
LUCY WILHELM, Assistant. 

DUTIES 

It is the duty, under the statutes, of the Reporter of the Supreme 
Court to edit and publish the volumes containing the opinioils of the Su- 
preme and Appellate Courts.- Since the filing of the last report there 
have been published and distributed Volumes 62 and 63 of the Ap- 
pellate Court Reports, while Volume 64 is in an advanced state of prepa- 
ration. Volume 185 of the Supreme Court Reports has been distributed 
and Volume 186 is completed and will be available to subscribers of the 
reports at an early date. 

It is the aim of this department to publish reports that are com- 
prehensive and complete, and as free from error as possible, and as 
rapidly as circumstances permit. The reporter trusts that the work of 
his office will merit the approval of those using the reports. 



(194) 



REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF GEOLOGY AND 
NATURAL RESOURCES 

(Forty-Third Annual Report) 



EDWARD BARRETT, State Geologist. 

LIST OF ASSISTANTS 

L. P. DOVE, Field Assistant. 

L. F. BENNETT, Field i\ssistant. 

ALLEN D. HOLE, Field Assistant. 

ARTHUR J. COLEMAN, Taxidermist. 

FLOYD E. WRIGHT, State Supervisor of Natural Gas. 

DOROTHY BARRETT, Stenographer and Clerk. 

L. C. VANARSDALE, Custodian and Messenger. 

FOREWORD 

Early last spring a request was made by the U. S. Bureau of 
Mines for co-operative work in raw materials that would conduce 
to the winning of the, war. Acting on the suggestion of the above 
Bureau I selected three raw materials for the work of the field season: 

1. A survey of the pyrite of the coal fields. 

2. A survey of flints or cherts. 

3. A survey of molding sands. 

The pyrite is used in the manufacture of sulphuric acid, which is 
necessary in making high explosives. The flints or cherts are used as 
abrasives, and the molding sands are used in our steel and iron in- 
dustries. 

The field work was done under my direction, ably assisted by the 
men whose names appear at the head of the several surveys. 

INTRODUCTION 

BY EDWARD BARRETT, STATE GEOLOGIST 

The U. S. Geological Survey has divided the coal areas of the 
country into six large units or provinces, viz., the Eastern, the In- 
terior, the Gulf, the Northern Great Plain, the Rocky Mountain, and 
the Pacific Coast provinces. 

The Interior province includes all the bituminous coal fields of the 
Mississippi valley and the coal fields of Texas and Michigan. The In- 
terior province is again divided into the Eastern, Western, South- 
western, and Northern regions. The Western region embraces the coal 
fields of Iowa, Missouri, Kansas, Arkansas, and Oklahoma. The East- 
ern region embraces the coal fields of Illinois, western Kentucky, and 
Indiana. Thus it is seen that the Indiana coal fields belong to the 
Eastern region of the great Interior or Mid-Continent coal province, 
and it may be added that the coal fields of Indiana lie on the very east- 

(195) 



196 Year Booic 

ern margin of the great Interior province. To be more specific and to 
confine the discussion within the limits of the State of Indiana, we 
would say that the following sixteen counties are underlain with coal: 
Vermillion, Parke, Vigo, Clay, Sullivan, Greene, Knox. Daviess, Martin, 
Gibson, Pike, Dubois, Posey, Vanderburgh, Warrick, and Spencer. In 
addition to these the following nine counties are partially underlain 
with coal : Warren, Fountain, Montgomery, Putnam, Owen, Lawrence, 
Crawford, Orange, and Perry. The sixteen counties above comprise 
about 7,000 square miles, and this may be taken as a conservative esti- 
mate of the number of square miles of workable coal lands in Indiana. 

The coal regions of the great Interior province have a total thick- 
ness of about 2,000 feet in southeastern Illinois. The portion of the 
basin included in the Indiana field has a thickness of about 1,300 feet. 
Coal seams of various thicknesses to the number of thirty-four occur, 
and two-thirds of this number are fairly persistent over the entire coal 
area. The thickness of the seams varies from a few inches to 12 or 
14 feet. All of the coals of Indiana are of the bituminous class, and 
may be divided into Bituminous, Block, and Cannel coals. The prin- 
cipal workable seams of coal are numbered from the bottom upward, 
by using Roman numerals, from Coals I. to IX. Between any two 
seams of coal there are alternate layers of shale, sandstone, or lime- 
stone. 

The pyrite investigations made during the past summer under the 
direction of the writer and ably assisted by Mr. L. P. Dove, of North- 
western University at Evanston, Illinois, show that the best and most 
extensive pyrite-bearing seams are Coals III, V, and VI, and of these 
three seams, perhaps 80 per cent of the pyrite occurs in Coal V. The 
discussion of the origin, occurrence, and concentration of pyrite in our 
coal seams is found in another part of this report. And in addition 
to the above phases of the investigation, Messrs. Holbrook and Dove 
discuss the chemical and physical composition, and appearance of py- 
rites, as well as its uses and methods of recovery. The matter of the 
preparation of pyrite for the market and the question of a modern 
washery plant are also outlined by them. 



PRELIMINARY REPORT ON THE MOLDING SANDS OF INDIANA 

(By Allen D. Hole, Assistant, and Edward Barrett, State Geologist.) 

PREFACE 

In planning for the investigation of the molding sands of Indiana, 
it was thought desirable that information on the following points should 
be sought, namely: 

1. Data as to the amount, kinds, and value of molding sand used 
by foundries in Indiana the past year, together with information as to 
the present sources from which the molding sands used are secured. 

2. Data concerning deposits of sand within the State which are 
being used by foundries for molding sands, together with an examina- 
tion of the various grades which occur. 



Geology and Natural Resources 197 

3. The mode of occurrence of these deposits, for the purpose of de- 
termining conditions under which they were formed. 

4. The location of undeveloped deposits which give especial prom- 
ise for the production of sands of a desired quality under conditions 
which would make their exploitation economically possible. 

The work outlined above has been only partially completed, since 
the amount of time available for the work has been limited to a por- 
tion of the summer of 1918, but the results so far reached seem to be 
of sufficient importance to warrant the issuing of this preliminary re- 
port, since it has been found that there is a great demand for informa- 
tion in regard to the molding sands of the State both on the part of the 
owners of foundries and also on the part of the men who own land 
upon which deposits of sand are found which are thought to be suit- 
able for use as foundry sands. The conditions which make this demand 
for information particularly urgent are, briefly, the great increase in 
the iron industry in the State of Indiana in the past few years, to- 
gether with the fact that the opening up of new deposits of molding 
sand has not kept pace with the increased demand in the State. To 
these two conditions there are to be added two others, namely, the in- 
creased difficulty which foundrymen have experienced within the past 
year of securing cars for the transportation of molding sand as rapid- 
ly as it was needed, and the increased freight charges for the trans- 
portation of the sand, even after the cars heeded were secured. The 
effect of these conditions working together has of course been to stimu- 
late the search for suitable molding sands located as near as possible 
to the foundries in order that the cost, of transportation might be re- 
duced and that an ample supply when needed might be more sure. On 
the part of those owning deposits of sand suitable for use in the foundry 
there has also come the increased inducement of a higher price which 
the foundries can readily afford to pay in consideration of finding the 
sand nearer, so that even though a higher price per ton is paid for the 
sand desired the total cost when delivered to the foundry may be less 
because of the elimination of a considerable part of the increased freight 
charges. 

It is for the purpose therefore of assisting both the foundrymen 
and the owners of deposits of molding sand that this partial report is 
issued at this time. It is hoped that the investigations outlined above 
may soon be carried to completion and that a final report representing 
in an adequate way the molding sand industry in the State of Indiana 
may be given to the public. 

introduction 

The term molding sand as here used is intended to include those 
natural mineral deposits, largely siliceous, which are suitable for mak- 
ing molds or cores for use in casting metals, especially iron, steel, brass, 
aluminum and bronze. The materials suitable for such a purpose vary 
through a relatively wide range from a very coarse sand, or even fine 
gravel on the one hand to a heavy loam containing a considerable 
amount of clay, on the other. There is also a very considerable range 



198 Year Book 

in the kind of material needed, depending upon the character of the 
casting to be made, and the methods to be employed in the work. For 
example: If the size of the casting to be made is small, that is, weigh- 
ing from a few ounces up to a few pounds, the material desired is 
usually a fine to a very fine sand and if an especially smooth surface 
be desired in the finished casting, a considerable amount of clay in the 
sand is not only permissible but may be necessary; on the other hand, 
if the casting is large, weighing from a few hundred pounds up to forty 
or fifty tons, the sand required is usually coarse with a high degree of 
porosity or openness, with the amount of clay permissible relatively 
small. Again, the quality of the sand required for making the mold, 
that is the form into which the molten metal is poured, is in general 
different from the quality of material needed in making the cores, that 
is, those parts which are introduced into the mold representing holes or 
open spaces in the finished casting. Furthermore, a different quality 
of sand is required for what is termed "green-sand molding," as con- 
trasted with dry or baked sand. The term "green-sand molding" here 
applies to the use of moist sand without any special preparation before 
the molten mefal is poured into the mold while in the case of the dried 
or baked sands the mold is subjected to a greater or less degree of 
heat to remove most of the moisture before the molten metal comes in 
contact with its surface. Although these and other conditions which 
might be named make possible the use of sands of a rather wide range 
as to composition and properties, nevertheless for any one kind of work 
the quality of sand used should be nearly uniform in order that uniform- 
ly good work may be turned out. It is therefore necessary that the 
owners of deposits of sand suitable for use in the foundry should be 
careful in taking out the sand, either to keep the different grades which 
may be present separate or to mix the different grades in a fixed pro- 
portion so that the quality of a given grade when shipped shall be as 
nearly uniform as possible. If a producer of sand becomes known 
among foundrymen as one who sends out sand practically uniform for 
each grade offered he will be able not only to retain his old cus- 
tomers but will be able to increase his business to an extent which 
would be impossible if he is less careful in sending out sands practi- 
cally uniform for each grade which he is able to supply. 

As yet, no well established method of testing the qualities of mold- 
ing sand has been found, although there is an increasing disposition 
to place some reliance upon physical analysis -as furnishing a means 
of comparing the quality of sands derived from different sources or 
from the same pit at different times. The main reliance, however, is 
upon the results which are secured by the use of the sand in the 
foundries, and it is therefore absolutely necessary in the development 
of any deposits that the advice of a man accustomed to judging the 
quality of molding sand should be sought before any great expense is 
incurred. Men of the kind of experience required are to be found among 
the foremen of foundries and also among geologists who have given 
special attention to this phase of the subject. 



Geology and Natural Resources 199 

properties of molding sand 

The value of a sand for use in foundry work is determined by cer- 
tain properties, chief among which are the following: 

Color. The first property here mentioned, namely, color, is, strictly 
speaking, not an essential characteristic of molding sand providing the 
other characteristics named below are present, but in view of the fact 
that the color of the sand is one of its most noticeable characteristics 
and in view of the farther fact that in prospecting for molding sand 
it is very helpful to have in mind the color which is most commonly 
found associated with the really essential properties, it is worth while 
mentioning the property of color, first. 

The color of molding sand a^ used on the floors of foundries is very 
dark to black. This black color is, however, due to the fact that a 
considerable proportion of the sand has been used one or more times be- 
fore in the making of molds and there has become incorporated in the 
sand a certain amount of graphite and minute particles of iron, to- 
gether with dust containing a small amount of soot, which gives the 
very dark or black color to the sand after it has been in the foundry 
and the process of making castings has been going on. The color of 
the sand as found in the pits from which it has been taken and as 
shown in the bins in the foundries from which the sand is drawn to re- 
plenish the floors is most commonly yellow or yellowish-brown. In some 
cases, especially in the case of the coarser sands used for large cast- 
ings, the color is decidedly red. In the case of sand used for the mak- 
ing of cores, the color is usually white or light gray, since the kind of 
sand used in largest quantities for the making of cores is lake sand 
or sand taken from valleys or hills near streams, which has been 
deposited by water. In prospecting for molding sand, therefore, it is 
well to have in mind the fact that a sand suitable for making molds is 
likely to be yellowish-brown to reddish in color and that sand suitable 
for use in making cores may be a clean white or light gray sand. 

Bond or Cohesiveness. One of the essential properties of a good 
molding sand is the ability of the grains to adhere to each other when 
slightly moistened. A rough test of the amount of bond which the sand 
contains can be made by squeezing in the hand some of the slightly 
moistened sand and observing the amount of resistance to an effort to 
pull the mass apart after it has been pressed together. It has been 
found that the bonding power of a sand depends chiefly upon the fineness 
of grain, the presence of moisture, and the presence of clay particles. 
A good molding sand should have enough cohesiveness to enable the 
sand to retain the shape given to it in molding after the pattern has 
been withdrawn and also sufficient cohesiveness to withstand the action 
of the molten metal as it is poured into the mold; that is, sufficient co- 
hesiveness so that the particles of sand on the face of the mold will not 
fall away as the metal is being poured in. If the amount of clay or 
very fine sand particles is too great the value of the sand is impaired 
because the next-named essential property is to too great a degree de- 
stroyed. 



200 Year Book 

Openness or Permeability. Another essential property of molding 
sand is its openness or permeability. This means the degree of readi- 
ness with which the sand will permit gases under a slight pressure to 
pass through it. In "green-sand molding" a certain amount of mois- 
ture is present in the sand when the molten metal is poured into the 
mold. This moisture is in part converted quickly into steam and must 
find a way of escape without separating the sand grains from each 
other, if the casting is to come from the mold uninjured. In the case 
of molds which are dried or baked, there is present in the spaces be- 
tween the sand grains, air, which upon being heated by the molten 
metal expands and, like the steam, must find a way of escape without 
forcing the grains apart if the casting is to come from the mold in per- 
fect condition. In the "green-sand molding" also, there is the action 
of the air as well as the action of the moisture. In all cases there is 
in addition a certain amount of gases of various kinds which are given 
off from the molten metal itself in the process of cooling, and this 
adds itself also to the steam and to the heated air, and unless the mold 
is sufficiently open blow holes will be formed and the perfection of the 
casting will be marred. 

The openness or the permeability depends upon the size of the pores 
or open spaces between the grains of sand. Other things being equal, 
the coarser the sand the greater the permeability. A fine sand may 
have as large a volume of pore space, that is, as great porosity, but 
be much less open than a coarse sand, just because the pores in the fine 
sand are all small and therefore obstruct to a greater degree the pass- 
age of the gases which at the time of casting must find a way of es- 
cape. If the amount of clay particles or fine sand particles is too great 
the openings between the sand grains are filled up and therefore the 
presence of too high a percentage of the materials which give bonding 
power destroys to too great a degree the necessary openness of the 
sand. ! , 

Refractoriness. By refractoriness is meant the property by virtue 
of which the sand resists the effect of the heat of the molten metal. 
In order that a molding sand shall be suitable for use in making cast- 
ings it must of course be able to retain its form without melting even 
though molten metal comes in contact with it and remains in contact 
until it cools. It is because common sand in general is composed chief- 
ly of quartz which will not melt at the temperature of molten iron that 
it has been found suitable for use in the making of molds for use in 
foundries. 

Composition. Closely connected with the property just named, re- 
fractoriness, is that of composition, since the ability of sand to resist 
heat depends upon the kinds of minerals present. As already stated the 
mineral which should be present in largest quantity is quartz. In 
order that there shall be sufficient bonding power a small percentage of 
clay is permissible, but if there be present more than a fraction of a 
per cent of iron, or if there should be present lime or magnesia in con- 
siderable amounts, thes^ substances will act as a flux and cause the 
melting of a greater or less amount of the sand next to the molten 
metal. This will introduce defects into the casting; and especially in 



Geology and Natural Resources 201 

castings where a very high degree of heat is necessary, such as steel 
castings or malleable iron castings, the melting of the sand when flux- 
ing elements are present is likely to be sufficient to injure the casting 
to such a degree as to make it unfit for the purpose for which it was 
intended. 

Texture. The texture of the sand is closely related to the property 
of openness, which has already been discussed. Texture relates to the 
size of particles and therefore coarseness of texture necessarily ac- 
companies high permeability. It cannot, however, be stated that the 
texture determines the permeability entirely, since molding sands are 
made up of a mixture of sand grains of different sizes and the relation 
between the percentage of each of the sizes is also a factor in determin- 
ing the openness or permeability of the sand. It is in giving information 
in regard to this property of the sand that physical analyses have one of 
their chief values. 

Life of the Sand. Another property which is important is expressed 
by the term life of the sand. This means the number of times which a 
given portion of sand can be used before it loses some one of its essential 
qualities. The quality which is soonest destroyed is that of bonding 
power. Some good molding sands can be used but once, as the co- 
hesiveness seems to be destroyed by one contact with the molten metal. 
Others may be used again and again. It is, of course, true that in a 
given mold the sand next to the molten metal loses its cohesiveness 
first, and in the case of all sands a certain amount of fresh material 
must be added each day to the supply on the floor, but there is a very 
wide range of difference in the amount which must be added each day 
when sands from different sources of supply are used. From experi- 
. ments which have been made it seems that the loss of life or loss of 
bonding power is due chiefly to the chemical changes produced in the 
clay in the presence of the heat of the molten metal. Some other ele- 
ments enter, perhaps, also. 

MOLDING SANDS USED BY INDIANA FOUNDRIES IN 1918 

Data in regard to the grades of molding sand used by Indiana 
foundries, sources of supply, amount, and cost, have been secured from 
about 90 per cent of the foundries in the State. The statistics collected 
are in most cases accurate, being furnished by officers of the various 
firms interviewed, from records on file in their respective offices. In a 
few cases the amounts reported are estimates only. The total results 
given in the table below are listed as "approximate" partly because 
some of the data collected are known to be estimates, but chiefly because 
the prices charged per ton have not been uniform throughout the year, 
and also because the cost of transportation has likewise been changing. 
Both of these changes have, however, been in the direction of increase, 
so that the totals for the calendar year, 1918, are probably somewhat in 
excess of the amounts tabulated below which have been made up from 
the figures reported by the various foundries. 



202 Year Book 

approximate amount and value of molding sand used in indla.na in 

1918 

(Values given include freight charges from pits to foundries.) 

Molding Sands. Core Sands. 

Tons. Value. Tons. Value. 

From deposits in Indiana 23.568 $35,804 31,548 $36,522 

From deposits outside of Indiana 100,485 227,442 5,250 10,710 



Total 124.053 $263,246 36.798 $47,232 

Total molding sands and core sands, 160,851 tons. 

Total cost delivered at foundries, $310,478.00. 

Of the above total, 55,116 tons, costing $72,326.00, were derived from 
deposits within the State of Indiana, while 105,735 tons, costing $238,- 
152.00, were secured from sources of supply outside of Indiana. 

DEPOSITS OF SAND IN INDIANA 

The examination of localities in Indiana where deposits of molding 
sand are known or where it is probable that they exist has not been 
completed. The investigations so far made have shown that molding 
sand of excellent quality for certain classes of work is found in not less 
than twenty-five counties of the State. The localities where it has been 
ascertained that deposits of sands occur which are suitable for use in 
foundries are listed below by counties. In some cases it is evident that 
the supply is limited and perhaps would not warrant the expenditure of 
a sufficient amount of money in development to place the sand on the 
market outside of supplying the needs of local foundries. In other cases 
the supply is very large and has already been developed to such an ex- 
tent as to warrant the laying of a switch to the nearest railroad and 
the shipment of sand amounting to hundreds of carloads from a single 
point per year. Foundries desiring to secure sand from any of the 
points named below may secure further information by writing to the 
companies or individuals named. 

Allen County, Molding sand has been found near New Haven on 
a farm belonging to Sturm Brothers and is delivered by them to foun- 
dries in Ft. Wayne by wagon. 

In the northern part of the city of Ft. Wayne, along the river, de- 
posits are found containing some sand suitable for use as molding and 
core sands. Southwest of Ft. Wayne about three miles, near the green- 
houses on the Bluffton road, molding sand is found on farms belonging 
to Charles Stuck and William Stuck (postoffice R.. R. Ft. Wayne, In- 
diana,) which is delivered by wagon to foundries in the city. 

Bartholomew County. Sand suitable for use in foundry work is 
found about three miles east of Columbus. Supplied to foundries in 
the city by Fred Dahn, Jr. 

The southern part of Bartholomew County no doubt contains good 
molding sand at a number of points but it is so far not developed. 

Cass County. Sand used chiefly for core sand is supplied from Lake 
Cicott, by the Lake Cicott Sand and Gravel Company. 

Clark County. Low hills and terraces on the east side of Silver 



Geology and Natural Resources 203 

Creek, about one and one-half miles east of New Albany, afford a sup- 
ply of molding sand of good quality which is being taken out for the 
use of foundries in New Albany. The pits already opened are on the 
farms of Mr. Martin Durking, and Messrs. Taylor, iiimery, and Mc- 
Cullough. 

Clay County. A deposit of molding sand on the property of the 
Crawford and McCrimmond Company's foundry supplies the needs of 
that foundry for molding sand. 

Elkhart County. Deposits in the northeastern part of Goshen, the 
property of local foundries, are used to supply their needs in part. 

Grant County. Deposits of molding sand on the north side of the 
Mississinnewa river at Marioi^ have been used to a limited extent by 
foundries in the city to supply their local needs. These deposits are not, 
however, being used at the present time except to a very limited extent. 

Henry County. A small amount of good sand is found in the north- 
western portion of Newcastle which is drawn upon by a local foundry to 
supply a part of its needs. The covering of soil and glacial till over- 
lying the molding sand is, in the only place so far examined, too great 
to make an extensive digging of the sand at this point profitable. 

Jackson County. One and one-half miles " southwest of Brownstown 
on the farm of Phillip Gossman a deposit of sand has been worked for 
about twenty years and is reached by a switch from the B. & O. S. W. 
railroad. The sand is here chiefly somewhat coarse in quality and very 
suitable for use in making heavy castings. The output is at present 
controlled by the Newport Sand Bank Company, Newport, Kentucky. 

About three miles south of Seymour, on a farm belonging to John 
Kilgas (R. R. 5), Seymour, Indiana, molding sand of good quality is 
found similar in general to the deposit near Brownstown. Molding 
;7and has been shipped from this pit from time to time for several 
years. 

Jefferson County. Fjr^e molding band, and sliarp band bUJtable for 
use in making cores, are fourd at various points in and near Madison in 
amounts sufficient to supply the needs of the local foundries. 

Knox County. Foundries in Vincennes are supplied chiefly from 
local deposits for both molding and core sands. The pit supplying most 
ci the sand used at present is on land owned by Theodore Wagner, lo- 
cated just \\est of Lakew~'>d Park. 

Lagrange Co-imiy. Exiensive deposits of sand and gravel one mile 
northeast of Wolcottviile are being developed by the Northern Indiana 
Sand and Gravel Company. TI13 sand and gravel, washed and graded, 
is shipped to contractors chiefly for construction purposes, but carload 
shipments of their "No. 2" sand are constantly in demand for use by 
foundries as a core sand. 

Lake County. From various points in the county, especially at and 
near East Gary and Hammond, sand is hauled or shipped to foundries 
for use in making cores. 

Laporte County. Sand dunes near Michigan City supply most of 
the sand used by Indiana foundries for core-making. So far as reports 
received show, the firms having offices in the county that ship the larg- 
est amount of "lake sand" are the Hoosier Slide Sand Company, the 



204 Year Book 

Pinkston Sand Company, and the Silica Sand Company, all of Mich- 
igan City, Indiana. 

Marion County. Molding sand of good quality has been supplied for 
some years by James A. Hagerty, 1667 Union street, Indianapolis, 
Indiana. The pits from which the sand has been secured are located in 
or near the city of Indianapolis. 

Morgan County. Molding sands and core sands of practically all 
grades needed by foundries are shipped by Bradford Bros., of Centerton. 
This deposit, located about one and one-half miles southwest of Cen- 
terton, has been a source of supply for about thirty years. 

Investigations made in the progress of the work during the past 
summer indicate that other deposits of molding sand of good quality 
occur directly across White river east of Bradford Bros., and on In- 
dian creek, two miles east of Martinsville, on the farm of J. E. Robin- 
son. Also on the north bluff of White river four miles southwest of 
Martinsville near Hindsdale. 

Porter County. For some years shipments of molding sand have 
been made from pits about five miles east of Valparaiso, one mile or 
more from Nickel. These pits are operated by the Garden City Sand 
Company, of Chicago, Illinois. 

Shipments are also made from pits near McCool, in the northwestern 
part of the county by Mr. J. S. Robbins. 

St. Joseph County. Foundries in South Bend and Mishawaka are 
for the most part supplied with various grades of molding sand from 
sources sufficiently near to permit delivery by wagon from pit to foundry. 
Some foundries purchase the sand in place, and haul with their own 
teams. In other cases the owners of the land deliver upon order. 

A complete list of owners of land where good molding sand is found 
could not be obtained in the time available for the investigation, but the 
following includes those who have recently supplied the largest amounts, 
viz.: 

G. W. Wiggins, Mishawaka, Indiana; and Charles Smith, Harvey R. 
King, David Whiteman, Albert Powell, William Konzen, and Edwin L. 
Perkins, all in or near South Bend. 

Spencer County. Extensive deposits of good molding sand of me- 
dium to fine grade are found at Rockport and at other points near by, 
notably at Richland Junction. Shipments in quantity are being made 
by various companies, but chiefly by Hougland & Hardy, with office 
in Evansville as well as Rockport, and by the Southern Indiana Mold- 
ing Sand Company. 

Starke County. Sand used chiefly in making cores is shipped from 
pits about one mile southeast of North Judson. The business is under 
the management of Mr. C. W. Weninger, of North Judson. 

Steuben County. Washed sand "No. 2," and in smaller amounts 
"No. 1," are grades supplied by Lennane Bros, from their sand and 
gravel separating plant at Pleasant Lake. These grades are sup- 
plied to foundries for use as core sands. 

Tippecanoe County. "Bank sand," derived from stratified deposits 
in hills in the southwestern part of Lafayette, and other "sharp" sand 



Geology and Natural Resources 205 

from other localities in the city supply, in part, the needs of local 
foundries for core sands. 

Vanderburgh County. Foundries in Evansville are in large part 
supplied with molding sand from deposits in or near the city of which 
the following are the principal localities reported, viz. : 

(1) Just west of Oak Park Cemetery, operated by J. C. Hawkins. 

(2) On the Newberg Pike, beyond the city limits (an extension of 
Lincoln avenue road). 

(8) At Kentucky avenue and Division street, property of the Vul- 
can Plow Works. 

Vermillion County. Sand suitable for core sand and molding sand 
is known to occur at and near Hillsdale, though shipments for these pur- 
poses are not at present being made. 

Vigo County. One foundry in Terre Haute is supplied with molding 
sand, including coarse and medium coarse grades, from pits owned 
and operated by Harry Lynn (post office address, Terre Haute, In- 
diana, Route E.). These pits are between Terre Haute and Seeley- 
ville, about five miles east of the former place. Other deposits occur 
near by which are not yet opened up. 

geological relations of molding sand deposits 

So far as now known the deposits of molding sand in Indiana lie 
either within the area which was covered with glacial ice in Pleisto- 
cene time, or near to streams flowing from the glaciated area. The ma- 
terials appear, therefore, to be glacial in origin, though a part of the 
deposits, as for example those near Rockport, were laid down at con- 
siderable distances beyond the farthest limit of ice movement. In age 
the deposits are either Pleistocene or Recent. No residual deposits of 
molding sand, as distinguished from transported deposits, have been 
observed. 

The agents involved in the formation of the deposits observed include 
the following as chief, viz.: 

1. Water. 

2. Wind. 

3. Temperature changes and gravity, aided by organic agencies. 

The frequent occurrence of molding sand in hills or terraces near to 
well developed drainage lines, but yet not directly adjacent to the al- 
luvial flood plains which are almost invariably found in the bottom of 
such channels, seems to indicate that conditions favorable to the de- 
position of sand with small quantities of silt or clay were found in 
bay-like bodies of water extending away from streams swollen wdth 
water from rains and from melting ice, forming thus relatively quiet 
backwater areas in which most of the sand and a small portion of the 
clay held in suspension could come to rest. Examples of deposits which 
were probably formed under these general conditions are found in Mor- 
gan County, near Centerton ; in Clark County east of Silver Creek, about 
one and one-half miles east of New Albany; in the eastern part of 
Vincennes, just west of Lakewood Park; and five miles east of Terre 
Haute along the valley of Lost Creek. 



206 Year Book 

The work of wind is clearly the predominant proximate agent in the 
case of the sands used for cores derived from the dunes in the north- 
western counties of the State; and while possibly not predominant, yet 
probably an important factor in such deposits as those at and near 
Rockport, where the loess seems to form an important part of the finer 
particles, constituting in some places the major part of the deposit, in 
other places mingling with true sand of various degrees of coarseness, 
becoming thus an important factor in giving to t^e product the neces- 
sary bonding power. 

In certain other parts of the State as, for example, in St. Joseph 
County north of Mishawaka and again in parts of southern Barthol- 
omew and northern Jackson counties, the history of the molding sand 
deposits seems to have been, in general, about as follows: 

1. Deposition of sand, coarse, medium and fine in a broad sheet 
with a slightly undulating surface, sometimes by water, sometimes by 
wind, sometimes by the co-operation of both these agencies. 

2. After the surface had become established permanently above the 
water level, or above the level of water for the greater part of the 
y^ar, the wind added silt and clay particles from adjacent till areas, 
forming finally in co-operation with the growth of vegetation a soil, 
which while still sandy, was nevertheless much richer in fine mineral 
particles than the dune areas. 

3. A gradual downward movement of a certain per cent of the 
silt and clay into the sand below, due to the co-operation of freezing and 
thawing, the slow downward filtration of water tending to move the 
finer particles into the larger openings, the growth and decay of roots 
of plants, the burrowing and carrying done by ants, worms, and other 
forms of animal life. 

No doubt other agencies co-operated in the work, but it is con- 
ceived that the above-named agents and processes as the principal ones 
co-operated with other minor agencies to produce the kind of formation 
observed, namely, a layer of sandy soil, eight inches to two feet in 
thickness, underlain by fifteen inches to four or five feet of sand, silt 
and clay mingled together in proportions suitable for use as molding 
sand, grading downward gradually into a bed of clean sharp sand 
which can be used in the foundry only for cores. 

SUGGESTIONS 

1. The production of molding sand in the State could no doubt 
be greatly increased if a careful examination were made to ascertain 
the location of other deposits in addition to those now known, and in 
some cases to develop more fully deposits which are being worked for 
only a part of the time. 

2. Detailed instructions concerning prospecting for new deposits 
can hardly be given; but in general it may be said that the most prom- 
ising localities are, first, among the low hills a few rods to a mile or 
two away from a well developed valley — hills situated usually near 
to a tributary of the main stream, affording in this way a close con- 
nection with the larger valley; and, second, beneath gently undulating 



Geology and Natural Resources 207 

surfaces which are covered with a distinctly sandy soil. When once a 
deposit of sand is found which appears to have the general qualities 
listed in the early part of this report as essential properties of mold- 
ing sand, the assistance of some one who has had experience in judging 
such sands should be sought. 

3. The kinds of sand purchased in largest amounts by foundries 
within the State from sources outside the State, are refractory sands 
suitable for use in making steel castings. While an increase in the 
production of molding sands of other kinds can perhaps be brought 
about most easily, it should be remembered that the production of re- 
fractory sands offers the largest field, and a consideration of this some- 
what more difficult line of development of the molding sand industry 
should not be overlooked. 

acknowledgement 

The authors of this report hereby record their obligations to own- 
ers of foundries, superintendents, foremen, and other officers, for the 
uniform courtesy shown when an interview was sought on the questions 
involved in the investigation upon which report is here made.. With- 
ouo this hearty co-operation, involving in some cases hours of time un- 
hesitatingly given by busy men, one part of this report could not 
have been written. In a precisely similar way owners and operators 
of pits from which the various grades of sand are produced, have 
given invaluable aid in another part of the work. To all those who 
have given such generous assistance acknowledgement is hereby grate- 
fully expressed. 

REPORT OF THE STATE SUPERVISOR OF NATURAL GAS 

FLOYD E. WRIGHT, State Supervisor. 
elberfeld structure 

The Elberfeld structure, so named on account of Elberfeld being 
the nearest town to the area covering the structure, extends in a 
southeasterly and northwesterly direction from the southeast corner of 
Gibson County across the northeast corner of Vanderburgh County with 
a possible extension into Warrick County. 

The surface of the area described is slightly undulating with what 
the U. S. Geological Survey designates as the Somerville Limestone 
outcropping in the cuts in the roadsides and small ravines over a 
greater part of the area. The Somerville Limestone belongs to the 
coal measures and lies between Coals VI and VII, and the bottom of 
the limestone is 230 feet above the top of Coal V, which is 90 to 125 
feet below the surface in this vicinity. The limestone in the eastern 
part of the area has been eroded away until only the bottom few feet 
remain, so that the levels taken and shown later indicate the bottom 
of the limestone, but farther west it shows a thickness of 35 to 40 
feet. 

The formations in general in this part of the State dip to the south- 
west, but in this area the formations have the necessary reverse dip 



£/b&rf&/c^ Sfrucfure. 




/O/oo^ Contours S/>o>v/'ng £/«\f,3^/on of //>g Someri/'/7/e lime .Sivne. 



Geology and Natural Resources 209 

to the east to form a well defined anticline. The formations from a 
point near the north end of the line between Sections 34 and 35, Tp. 
3 S., R. 10 W., in Gibson County, following a line in a southeasterly 
direction (22° east of south) running through the middle of Section 
25, Tp. 4 S., R. 10 W., in Vanderburgh County, dip to the northeast. 
The axis of the anticline rises to the southeast at the rate of 8 feet 
to the mile to a point in the south edge of Section 24, Tp. 4 S., R. 10 
W., where it then dips to the southeast as far as it could be traced, 
since beyond this point the lack of outcroppings in the valley of Pigeon 
Creek made accurate work impossible. The Somerville limestone from 
the above mentioned point in Section 24 dips to the east for a distance 
of two miles, with a total reverse^ dip of 70 feet. 

The possible underlying oil sands are the Mansfield sandstone, the 
sands of the Huron or Chester group and the Corniferous limestone. 
The Mansfield sandstone has produced oil for several years in the 
Princeton field and the sands of the Huron group are producing jn 
the Oakland City and Petersburg fields, with the Petersburg fields 
producing from four sands all belonging to the Huron group. The 
Corniferous limestone is below the Huron sands with several other inter- 
vening formations and ia producing oil at Terre Haute, Riley and near 
Lyons. A well drilled seven years ago to a depth of 2,000 feet in the 
west edge of this structure in Section 23, Tp. 4 S., R. 10 W., is said 
by a driller who worked on it to have had a flow of oil at 1,825 feet 
that if properly shot would have made a 60 to 100 barrel well, and 
although it v/as pulled and plugged is still making some gas. 

The above structure on account of having a greater reverse dip 
to the east and covering a larger area than any other structure de- 
veloped in that part of the State, with an unlimited area to the west of 
it from which the oil could be collected by the structure, it should be 
equal to or better than any southwestern Indiana field yet developed. 

PETERSBURG OIL FIELD 

The area referred to as the Petersburg oil field includes an oil 
field west of town, another east of town and a gas field a few miles 
south. The surface formations belong to the Coal Measures and in 
the greater portion of the area include the sandstones, shales, and lime- 
stones between Coals V and VII. The coal being mined along the 
E. & I. Railroad through Pike County is number V and is from 60 
to 90 feet deep in the vicinity of Petersburg. The coal openings and 
borings have been a valuable index to the location "and extent of the 
oil structure in the Petersburg and Oakland City oil fields. Records 
of the elevation of the coal in the Petersburg and Oakland City oil 
fields show that when a dome or anticline exists in the coal it also exists 
in the lower formations and has been proven to be a safe guide for oil 
operations. 

The sands producing gas and oil in the Petersburg field belong to 
the Huron group of sandstones and shales, the two lower sands being 
the same as those producing in the Oakland City field, while the two 
upper sands, locally known as the Rumble and Gladdish, belong to the 
same group but do not produce oil in the Oakland City field. A dry 

14—13956 



Geology and Natural Resources 211 

hole drilled on the Rumble farm (near the west end of the N. Vi. of 
the S. E. 14 of Section 36, Tp. 1 N., R. 9 W.) to a depth of 1,375 
feet penetrated all the sands producing in the field at the following 
depths: Rumble, 904; Gladdish, 1,082; Oakland City, 1,272; and the 
Brown at 1,315. 

The gas wells belonging to A. B. Bement located south of Peters- 
burg are finished in the Rumble sand. The four wells have a volume of 
6,000,000 cubic feet each per 24 hours with a pressure of 400 pounds. 
The strong flow and the high pressure of the wells indicate that they 
are located in a well-defined structure which will no doubt in the 
future produce some oil. A well drilled recently a short distance 
southeast of the gas wells is producing some oil. Future operations 
will doubtless develop an oil field' southwest of the gas since the area 
southwest is on the slope of the anticline following the general dip of 
the country, which in most cases is the slope that is most productive 
in oil. 

Developments west of Petersburg show that in the central part of 
the field, the Rumble and Gladdish sands dip rapidly to the west and quit 
producing, while the Oakland City and Brown sands rise rapidly to 
the west and produce farther west than the other sands. 

The production from the various oil fields in Indiana for the year 
ending September 30, 1918, is as follows: 

Field. Wells. Bbls. 

Petersburg 120 208,126 

Princeton and Oakland City 220 76,624 

Sullivan 488 209,345 

Hazelton 33 115,200 

Trenton Rock 1,449 192,627 

Total 2,310 801,922 

The gas laws of Indiana were enacted several years ago when the 
developments were confined to the Trenton Rock field, where the water 
conditions were very simple and easily taken care of in the event of 
abandonment of the wells. It was discovered that by allowing the fresh 
water from the upper strata to flow, either from pulling the casing or 
by reason of leaks in the casing, that the water damaged the oil or 
gas and would finally drown it out. Since there was no salt water in 
the formations above Trenton Rock, and the true reason for the dam- 
age caused by the fresh water was not discovered, the law only re- 
quired that all fresh water be cased off from the oil or gas bearing 
rock, and in the event the pipe was pulled from the well it was required 
to be plugged in the manner described in the law, all of which was 
very satisfactory and effective for the Trenton Rock field. The real 
damage done by water leaks from the upper strata in a gas or oil well 
is not on account of the character or kind of water, but for the reason 
that it comes from a point near the surface and flows to the bottom of 
the well and creates a pressure at the bottom of the hole too great to be 
overcome by the upward pressure of the water in the oil or gas bearing 
rock, and consequently causes an inflow of ,water into the oil or gas bear- 
ing rock which floods the rock and drives away the oil or gas. The law 
should require all water in the upper strata to be cased off from the oil 



212 Year Book 

bearing rock, as in many cases in the southwest part of the State salt 
water is reached at a shallow depth. 

In the oil fields of the southwest part of the State, where in one small 
field there are three or four oil producing sands and the intervening 
shales which furnish the only place to properly set the plugs are thin 
and irregular, it is sometimes impossible to follow the method described 
by law and properly plug the wells. 

All the southwestern oil fields are located in the coal area of the 
State and every well drilled penetrates all the workable coal in the area 
and leaves the coal exposed to the water above it and the gas below, 
which in the future will cause great inconvenience and danger in operat- 
ing the coal. 

The gas laws should be revised so as to protect the oil sands in the 
event of there being more than one sand and should compel operators 
to record a log and exact location of each well for the benefit of future 
coal operations, and should require the coals to be plugged so as to be 
protected against gas and water. 



THE FLINTS AND CHERTS OF INDIANA 

By L. F. Bennett, Assistant, and Edward Barrett, State Geologist 

The Department of Geology of the State of Indiana was requested by 
the United States Bureau of Mines to investigate the mineral products 
which occur within the State and which can be used directly or indirectly 
as war materials. 

Flints and cherts were two of the rocks the Bureau requested the 
State to investigate. 

Because of the shortness of the time allotted to the task not much 
more than a reconnoissance was possible. A large number of limestone 
quarries were carefully examined and many miles of roads and fields 
were traveled over on the lookout for outcrops and for chert as it ap- 
pears in the soil. 

Definition. Flint is an almost lusterless variety of quartz. Under 
the microscope it appears to consist of very fine crystals mixed with a 
variable amount of amorphous silica. It has a compact texture, breaks 
with a conchoidal fracture and with sharp edges. It contains traces of 
lime, alumina, iron, and carbonaceous matter. The color varies from 
white to black; various shades of gray are the most common. It often 
shows a banded structure. 

"Chert is an impure flint." "It is an amorphous mineral substance 
composed of a mixture of hydrated and anhydrous silica." A flint which 
contains a high percentage of lime is called a chert by some writers. It 
is coarser and less homogeneous than flint. 

Occurrence and origin. Both flint and chert are most commonly as- 
sociated with limestones. It collects along the bedding planes and never 
along joint planes. The silica may be due, partly to a mechanical de- 
position, partly to a chemical precipitate derived from solutions moving 
through the still unconsolidated calcareous deposits, and in part to con- 
centrations subsequent to the formation of the limestone. The silica 



Geology and Natural Resources 213 

was primarily the tests of plants, as diatoms, and of animals, as radio- 
larian skeletons or the spicules of sponges. 

Thin layers of a siliceous limestone may be entirely silicified and all 
parts of the structure of the limestone may be retained. These weath- 
ered layers form the "nigger heads" of the soil of many localities and 
also form much of the chert of these areas. 

Most of the so-called flint of Indiana is technically a chert, and occurs 
disseminated through the limestones in small masses and grades gradu- 
ally into the limestones. These cherty masses are left in the soil upon 
the decomposition of the limestone, and when of large size they form a 
distinct hindrance in the cultivation of the soil. If the fragments are 
small they form a gravelly mass. These are washed in great quantities 
into the stream beds and are used as gravel on the roads of these same 
localities. 

In this paper the deposits will be called flint when present in layers 
in the limestones and will be called chert when found in irregular 
masses grading into the surrounding limestones and when found in the 
soil. 

The presence of chert in the soil indicates "that the limestone from 
which the soil was derived was cherty, and it also suggests that the 
remaining limestones of that level have the same general composition 
as those decomposed. 

The purer flint is present in lens like masses in the limestone and in 
what may be termed pseudo-layers. These so-called layers vary from 
an inch to six or eight inches in thickness and are very irregular in 
horizontal and vertical distribution. On the weathered surfaces of the 
limestone the flint forms slight projections and weathers in small and 
nearly rectangular pieces. 

Itinerary. Most of the places visited will be mentioned. The char- 
acter of the deposits and local uses, if any, will be discussed for each 
locality. No attempt was made to trace carefully the different forma- 
tions of the various periods in order to determine the exact geological 
locations of the deposits. 

Laurel, Franklin County. Two or three layers of flint were found 
south and southwest of Laurel. The two localities visited are at least a 
mile apart. Whether the flint in the two places belongs to the same 
layers was not determined. The layers are from two to six inches thick 
and very brittle at the outcrop and at no place was it possible to trace 
them any considerable distance. There is very little chert in the soil. 
The limestones containing the flint belong to the lower part of the 
Silurian. 

Laughery Creek. The creek was traversed from Versailles in Ripley 
County to its mouth two miles south of Aurora. This whole distance the 
creek flows through Ordovician limestones. Only now and then a small 
fragment of chert was seen. The hillsides have but few rock exposures 
and these show no flint. 

Very little chert is present in the soil about Aurora and not any 
was seen in the limestones of this locality. 

Madison and Vicinity, Jefferson County. All of the rocks except 
those close to the Ohio River are Silurian. Chert was found in the soil 



214 Year Book 

in small quantities in several places, but no traces of it were seen in the 
nearby limestones. At Cragmont, the home of the Southeastern Hospital 
for the Insane, chert is present near the highest part of the bluff in 
Niagara limestone, 400 feet above the Ohio River. Large pieces six or 
eight inches in diameter were found in one place. 

Hanover. Near this place several small patches of chert are to be 
found, but nowhere in large quantities; and at a lower level along the 
Madison-Hanover road just above a small limestone quarry there is a 
small outcrop. The chert here, as in most places, has no economic im- 
portance and is considered a nuisance in the fields in which it is found. 

Northwest of North Madison in East Fork of Clifty Creek several 
thin layers of flint are present. Five layers in five feet of limestone 
were seen in one place, and in another ten layers, none much over an inch 
in thickness, were counted in four and a half feet of limestone. Much 
thicker pieces of chert in the soil nearby shows that the flint was thicker 
in the overlying limestone. The flint of the layers is almost white and 
nearly pure. 

Vernon, North Vernon, and Vicinity, Jennings County. The rocks 
here are Devonian limestone and shales. There is a very great deal of 
chert in the soil to the northeast, and east, and west of North Vernon. 
Along the Pennsylvania Railroad much chert is present above the lime- 
stone just as if it has weathered from the shales. 

In ^ limestone quarry just north of North Vernon there are several 
thin layers of flint with an occasional rounded mass six inches in dia- 
meter; in another quarry to the northeast flint is also present, but much 
less than in the first named quarry. None of this has any economic im- 
portance; it would be better to say that it is a hindrance in the quarrying 
of the limestone. 

One-half mile south of Brewersville and five and one-half miles north 
of North Vernon on the south bank of Sand Creek there are ten layers 
of flint in a nine-foot exposure of limestone. The ten layers together 
are about eighteen inches thick. Nowhere else was there so much flint 
found in so small an exposure of limestone. Four miles southeast of 
this exposure, in a creek bed, more flint was seen, and the soil in the 
immediate vicinity contains much chert. It is a great hindrance to 
cultivation. Along the North Fork of the Muscatatuck River five miles 
east of Brewersville a limestone exposure of seventy-five feet in Silurian 
limestone shows no flint, but the soil above contains considerable chert. 

In the quarry of the Muncie Stone and Lime Company, one mile south 
of Vernon, there is no flint, but in a nearby old quarry and at a higher 
level two irregular layers of flint are present; two layers are also to be 
seen in a limestone exposure in the south part of the town of Vernon. 

Three miles south of Charleston, Clark County, on the Ohio River 
bluff near the mouth of Fourteen-mile Creek, ten or more layers of flint 
were found in Devonian limestone. They are like, and may belong to 
the same horizon as those found near Brewersville. Much fine broken up 
chert is present in the soil near the bluff, but very little to be seen near 
Charlestown. 

The remainder of the places visited are all in the Mississippian rock 
areas and for the most part in limestone regibns. 



I 

I 



Geology and Natural Resources 215 

Corydon, Harrison County. Several kinds of limestone are found 
here. All belong to the Mitchell formation. Much is nearly a litho- 
graphic limestone and breaks with a conchoidal fracture. It is called by 
many of the people of the region "flinty," but a careful examination 
shows very little silica in it. Some of the limestone is coarse grained, 
and a very little is almost oolitic. Occasionally a cherty piece is seen in 
the limestone, and in one exposure cherty concretions have weathered out 
like warts. Some of these contain fossils. In places the soil is full of 
chert. The pieces vary from the size of small gravel to six inches or 
more in thickness and a foot or more square. These larger pieces are 
built into fences and are thrown into holes, or otherwise used as riprap. 
On the surface these pieces are rc^ugh and slightly porous, within they 
are compact and flinty. No attempt has ever been made to use them, so 
far as I could learn, except in the ways mentioned above. 

At Corydon Junction, eight miles north of Corydon, a little flint was 
found in, and only in one place. There is but little chert in the soil. 

Milltqwn, Crawford County. The observations were made in the 
quarries of J. . B. Speed & Co. All of the limestone belongs to the 
Mitchell formation. The largest quantity has an exposure of 125 feet. 
It contains several grades of limestone. One layer which averages six 
feet in thickness and is midway between the top and the bottom is 
about one-sixth quartzitic or cherty. The cherty part is plainly visible 
and is intimately mixed with the limestone. It would be practically 
impossible to separate it from the limestone. The quarrymen crush this 
impure stone for road material. It gives excellent satisfaction. The 
cherty part wears well and the calcareous part acts as a good binder. 
The cherty layer is present in the three working quarries and is on the 
floor of a large abandoned quarry. It also outcrops in the country a 
short distance from the town. There is a comparatively small amount 
of chert in the soil. 

The following analysis shows the siliceous matter is really a chert: 

Loss on ignition 14 . 90% 

Silica (Si02) 61.28% 

Alumina (AI2 O3) 0.82% 

Ferric Oxide (Fez O3) 3.06% 

Calcium Oxide (CaO) 20.36% 

Magnesium Oxide (MgO) 0.10% 



100.02% 



Marengo, Crawford County. There is very little flint in this vicinity 
and but a small amount of chert. A large quarry in the town has an 
exposure of 75 feet and contains several differently textured Mitchell 
limestones, but no flint is present. 

English, Crawford County. No chert here of any consequence and 
not any flint is found. All of the rocks belong to the Huron and Mitchell 
formations, except in the bed of the creek which flows through the town. 
Three layers of limestone interstratified with sandstone and shale are 
present in the hills but none of these appear cherty. 

French Lick, Orange County. — Mitchell limestone is found in the 



216 Year Book 

base of the hills and Huron sandstone and shale above. The three layers, 
of limestone present in the vicinity of English are present here. The 
Mitchell limestone varies in texture from the nearly lithographic to the 
coarse-grained kind. But one large piece of chert was seen in the soil 
of this vicinity. There is very little chert of any size. 

Paoli, Orange County. Several quarries were examined. The lime- 
stones are characteristic of the Mitchell formation; some compact, some 
coarse grained, and some with considerable clay. No flint was seen in 
the limestone and very little chert in the soil of the vicinity. 

Salem, Washington County. Harrodsburg, Salem (Bedford) and 
Mitchell limestones are represented here. Several quarries, none very 
large, were visited and flint was found in but one of them. This quarry 
is in Salem, just north of the Monon Railroad. It contains but one layer 
and this is very irregular. The largest single piece is eight feet long 
and one to eight inches thick. Very little chert is present in the soil in 
the immediate vicinity, but much is found in places some distance from 
the city. Many miles of roads here are made largely from a gravel taken 
from the creek beds and consists of small chert fragments, small geodes, 
and clay and sand. 

On the side of the road, one and a half miles east of Salem, layers 
of nearly pure silica one to three inches thick are found. The fossilifer- 
ous character of the stone from which the chert was derived is nearly 
perfectly preserved. 

Mitchell, Lawrence County. Mitchell limestone is only found in the 
immediate vicinity. _ The larger quarries are owned by the Lehigh Port- 
land Cement Company. In a small quarry of this company five or six 
layers of flint are present. Some of the flint shows a banded struc- 
ture, parts are nearly white and other parts are black. At no place was 
the flint over six inches in thickness and all of the deposits were some- 
what lens-shaped. 

The following analysis shows that the flint here is of a high grade : 

Loss on ignition 1 . 15% 

Silica (Si02) 93.64% 

Alumina ( ALOs) 0. 76% 

Ferric Oxide (FeaOs) 4 . 08% 

Calcium Oxide (CaO) 0.68% 

Magnesium Oxide (MgO) Trace 



100.31% 



No flint is present in the largest quarry, and there is very little chert 
in this locality. In a Baltimore and Ohio railroad cut near the town 
there are many large rectangular blocks of chert, most all highly fos- 
siliferous and nearly pure silica. Some of the pieces will weigh several 
hundred pounds. No large sized pieces were seen in the fields nearby. 

Bedford, Lawrence .County. A long description could be given con- 
cerning the limestones of this region. Flint is not found anywhere and 
chert is present in very small quantities. What little siliceous matter 
there is has been washed into the stream beds from either the Upper 
Harrodsburg, the Salem, or the Lower Mitchell limestones, all of which 



Geology and Natural Resources 217 

are found here. Small geodes and chert fragments have been taken 
from the creek beds and used as gravel on the roads. 

Harrodsburg, Monroe County. The most noticeable siliceous de- 
posits are the geodes, which are very abundant in the Harrodsburg lime- 
stone. These are of all sizes up to a diameter of sixteen inches or more 
and may be seen in stream beds, fields, and in the outcropping limestone. 
They are nearly pure silica. No general use other than as museum spec- 
imens and for private curio collections has been found for them. Chert 
is present in small quantities. 

Bloomington, Monroe County. This vicinity has very little flint and 
only a small amount of chert. Geodes weather out from the Harrods- 
burg limestone to the east and chert from the Salem and Mitchell to the 
west. The chert is very irregular^ in distribution. Most of the frag- 
ments are small. 

Ellettsville and Stinesville, Monroe County. Both Salem and Mitchell 
limestones are found in the quarries. Not any flint is present and there 
is very small amount of chert. The same conditions prevail here as 
found farther south in Monroe County. The Mitchell limestone of this 
region shows no evidence of any highly siliceous limestone such as rep- 
resented by the large chert masses of Salem and Mitchell. 

Gosport, Owen County. All of the limestone belongs to the Harrods- 
burg formation. One typical exposure is in a cut made by the Pennsyl- 
vania railroad. The limestone is very hard, some is coarse grained and 
some fine, and parts are highly fossiliferous. .There are many geodes, 
most of which are small. The soil contains very little chert. 

Spencer, Oiven County. Only Mitchell limestone is present. There 
is but one large quarry near Spencer. In this the limestone is thin 
bedded and shows the general characteristics of the Mitchell stone. Near 
the top of the quarry there are three layers of flint within a vertical 
space of two feet. These are not continuous. There is almost as much 
space between the flint concretions as their horizontal extent. Some of 
the particles are nearly round on the face of the exposure and others 
are thin and flattened. The thickest particle is nine inches in diameter. 
The flint is almost pure. There is a little chert in the soil; perhaps 
this small amount is partly due to the fact that sandstone is on the 
hills and it contains very little chert. 

Cloverdale, Putnam County. Only a few good limestone exposures 
are found here. There are several small quarries in the vicinity of the 
town, from which stone is taken mostly for road making and for fer- 
tilizer. All of the quarries were visited. Flint is found in one place 
only and this in a quarry one mile southeast of Cloverdale. A lens 
four feet long and four inches thick is present. This flint is typical of 
all found in other places in the Mitchell limestone. There is a very small 
amount of chert. 

Putnamville, Putnam County. Nearly all of the observations were 
made in quarries on or near the State Penal Farm. A thin layer of 
nearly pure flint is found in a quarry just east of the Farm and two thin 
layers in the Monon railroad cut about three-fourths mile north of Put- 
namville. A very impure flint, better called a chert, is found in a 
quarry on the east part of the Penal Farm. There are ten to fifteen 



218 Year Book 

imperfect layers within a vertical space of ten feet and less. In a 
horizontal exposure of at least 300 feet these layers are found through- 
out the whole length, but there are breaks in all of them. Now and then 
a nodule of nearly pure flint is found, but much of the cherty material is 
not cleanly separated from the enclosing limestone. An application of 
acid shows the chert to contain considerable calcium carbonate. The 
cherty layers are dark colored and can be distinguished from the lime- 
stone at a distance of a hundred feet or more. The limestone contain- 
ing the chert is good for road material but not for any other purpose. 

From a large quarry near the center of the Farm, limestone is ob- 
tained for roads, fertilizer, and for lime. It contains no flint and is a 
high grade of Mitchell limestone. The soil is nearly free from chert. 

Greencastle, Putnam County. Two quarries were visited. There are 
no extensive outcrops on account of the covering of glacial clays. The 
Ohio and Indiana or "0 & I" quarry is two miles southwest. It is 
large, fully 50 feet high in the highest part and nearly one-fourth mile 
long. In the lower part there are several layers of cherty material 
similar to those found in the quarry at the State Penal Farm. The 
limestone containing the chert is thin layered, and the chert itself in 
places is very thin. Such layers as these when separated from a lime- 
stone by a decomposition of the stone are undoubtedly the origin of the 
thick masses of chert found in the soil in many places. 

The "A & C" quarry just east of Greencastle also contains the typical 
Mitchell limestone. The exposure is about 50 feet in height. There 
are several layers of cherty material similar to that found in "0 & I" 
quarry. The layers have a vertical distribution of about 9 feet. Above 
and below these layers there are several feet of nearly pure limestone. 
Near the upper part of the quarry there is a layer of flinty nodules, but 
it is not continuous the whole extent of the quarry. The following is an 
analysis of the chert: 

Loss on ignition 11 . 71% 

Silica (SiOa) 69.08% . 

Alumina (AI2O3) 0.40% 

Ferric Oxide (FeaO,) 2.90% 

Calcium Oxide (CaO) 16.22% 

Magnesium Oxide (MgO) Trace 



100.31% 



A few observations were made in the sandstone of the Knobstone 
formation. There were no indications either of flint or chert. 

Uses. "Flint in the early history of mankind was as important rela- 
tively to the general condition of life as iron is at the present day." 

Flint at present has but few important uses: It is used in the 
manufacture of pottery. It helps to diminish shrinkage. For this pur- 
pose it is calcined, thrown into cold water, then finely powered. It must 
contain less than one-half per cent of iron bearing minerals. It is used 
as a lining for tube mills. Most of the flint for this purpose was im- 
ported from Belgium before the war. Now other hard siliceous rocks 
are being substituted which can be secured in the United States. Peb- 



Geology and Natural Resources 219 

bles for grinding: Well rounded pebbles from about one and one-half to 
four inches are preferred. "These are used for grinding minerals, ores, 
cement clinker, etc., and those employed in the United States have been 
chiefly flint pebbles obtained from the chalk formations of Denmark and 
France, but not a few have been imported from other foreign countries. 
The value of the flint pebbles lies in their hardness and uniform char- 
acter, moreover they contain little else than silica, and hence there is 
little danger of the material worn off contaminating the ground product, 
as for example in grinding feldspar, which must be free from iron oxide. 

"The decrease in the foreign supply due to the present European war 
has stimulated search for domestic sources of supply with some re- 
sults. Pebbles of granite and quartzite have been imported into the 
United States from New Foundland and Ontario for some time, and 
similar ones can be found here. Stream pebbles of quartz have been 
tried in California gold mills, dense silicified rhyolite has given satisfac- 
tory results in some of the metallurgical mills of Nevada, and basalt 
has been tried in Oregon." — Economic Geology. Fourth Edition, Ries, 
John Wiley and Sons. 

Chert as chert is not listed as having any economic importance ex- 
cept for road material. It is grushed with the limestone with which it 
occurs, and it is taken from stream beds and put upon the roads as 
gravel. 

There is very little flint in Indiana that could be used in the ways 
mentioned above. It is not uniform in texture and composition, and it 
occurs in too small quantities to pay for separation from the enclosing 
limestones. 

The cherts are too soft except the large pieces, which may have a 
hard core or may be hard throughout. It would be an expensive pro- 
cess to gather and prepare even these for the market. 

Much of the flint imported from European countries has been brought 
into the United States as ballast. This has made it possible to bring it 
here and sell it at a much lower price than it can be produced in Indiana. 

Other States have flint and chert in much larger quantities than In- 
diana, and it may be they will become important competitors with other 
countries. 

Under present conditions it may be said that the flint and chert of 
Indiana do not represent a very important asset. In many places the 
flint is considered a positive harm in the quarrying of limestone, and the 
chert in the soil a serious hindrance to its cultivation. 

Workable Coal Seams of Indiana. By Edward Barrett 

Pyrite in the Coals of Indiana. By Leonard P. Dove 

The Concentration of Pyrite from the Coals of Indiana. By E. A. 

Holbrook 

Co-operative Agreement Between Indiana Department of Geology and 

United State Bureau of Mines 

INTRODUCTION 

Early in the present year 1918, it became necessary to greatly curtail 
imports of bulky ores that could be produced in this country, in order 



220 Year Book 

to release shipping for more important immediate needs. Pyrite, which 
had hitherto been brought from Canada^ and Spain,^ was included in the 
list. Importations at once dropped so that added to the expansion in 
the use of sulphur'' for making acid a heavy demand for sulphur for 
other industrial purposes put a severe strain on the sulphur industry. 
So strong was this demand that it was a question whether sulphur could 
be produced in sufficient quantities to satisfy the needs. It seemed neces- 
sary for domestic supplies of pyrites to be opened to avoid a crisis. Ac- 
cordingly the United States Geological Survey, the United States Bu- 
reau of Mines, and the State Geological Surveys became active in locat- 
ing adequate supplies of pyrite available to the bulk of the acid plants, 
located east of the Mississippi River. 

Pyrites are found in association with bituminous coals in the form 
of lenses, bands, nodules and replacements. For some years a limited 
tonnage of "coal brasses," as coal pyrites are commonly known to the 
trade, has been utilized in the manufacture of sulpuric acid. The de- 
velopments of the past year and a half have demontsrated that pyrite 
can be recovered profitably fi*om coal. The problems involved are not 
insurmountable. Among notable contributions to the literature of the 
industry may be mentioned "The Utilization of the Pyrite Occurring in 
Illinois Bituminous Coal," by E. A. Holbrook; Circular No. 5 of the 
Engineering Experiment Station of the University of Illinois, Urbana, 
Illinois, and "A Description of the Pyrite Washery near Danville, Illi- 
nois," by C. M. Young, in Coal Age, Vol. XI, No. 1, p. 7, January 6, 
1917. Since then other plants have been built until it may be said the 
industry is in a fair way of becoming established. 

On April 22, 1918, a conference of State Geologists from nine of the 
Central States was held at Urbana, Illinois, the States represented be- 
ing: Iowa, Missouri, Illinois, Michigan, Indiana, Kentucky, Tennessee, 
Ohio and Pennsylvania, together with H. A. Buehler in charge of the 
pyrite investigation, and E. A. Holbrook representing the U. S. Bureau 
of Mines. It was decided to make a co-operative examination of the coal 
mines of the various States for pyrites and make available the data of 
these resources. 

Under this co-operative agreement, the investigation of the coal mines 
of Indiana was undertaken by the writer. The period between June 4, 
and August 23, 1918, was occupied in collecting field data. 

Numbering of tJie Coal Seams. The numbering of the coal seams 
adopted by the Indiana^ Geological Survey is used throughout this re- 
port. This is described more in detail on page 196. 

Plan and Scope of Investigation. As the total number of mines in 
Indiana employing over ten men is two hundred and two,* and as usually 
but one mine could be visited in one day, it was necessary to select mines 
typical of a district (which were examined with the detail time allowed), 
and depend upon data from these mines to estimate the quantity of 

1 Total 210,615 tons in 1917. Smith. Phillip S., Min. Resources of the U. S., Pt. II. 
P. 27. 

2 747.880 in 1917. Ibid. 

3 Over 210,000 long tons in 1917 over 1916. Smith. Phillip. S. Min. Resources of 
the U. S.. 1917. Pt. II. p. 61. 

4 Report of Industrial Board of Indiana, 1917. p. 15. 



Ceology and Natural Resources 221 

pyrite in adjoining properties working the same seam. Two or more 
widely separated portions of a mine were usually visited. 

The method followed was to examine working faces, gob piles 
in the mine and on the surface, noting the amount of "sulphur" in each 
instance and reducing the estimated amount to a percentage of tonnage 
mined. 

Wherever possible many vertical sections of the coal, exactly ten feet 
apart, including the coal, bone, rock and "sulphur," were measured and 
noted. Where bands and lenses were abundant, ten to twenty sections 
in various portions of the mine made accurate estimates of available 
tonnages possible. Pyrite was regarded as having three times the 
weight of an equal bulk of coal, hence if an average section shows sixty 
inches of coal and one inch of pyrite, the percentage by weight of pyrite 
would equal 1 (inches of pyrite) x 3 (times the weight of an equal bulk 
of coal) X 100 (to reduce to percentage), divided by 60 (inches of coal), 
or 5 per cent. 

Suitable deductions were made for clay bands, bone, rock, etc., that do 
not appear in the tonnages of coal marketed. Wherever possible, the 
estimates were checked by estimating the amount of pyrite in gob piles, 
and where all pyrite had been sold, the ratio between pyrite and coal 
marketed was easily reduced to a percentage. 

In. most cases where the amount of pyrite was less than two or three 
per cent of the coal mined, gob piles in rooms and on the surface were 
relied upon for an estimate of quantity. 

A constant effort was made to make estimates as accurate as possi- 
ble. In most cases the estimates of tonnage of pyrite are conservative. 

This report should be considered a reconnoissance rather than a de- 
tailed estimate of the quantity of pyrite available. As such it is hoped 
it may call attention to a resource that if utilized might add a substan- 
tial income each year to the coal industry of the State and serve the 
Nation in supplying a necessary mineral. 

Acknowledgew,ents. The writer is under obligation to E. A. Hol- 
brook, Superintendent of the U. S. Bureau of Mines, Experiment Station, 
Urbana, Illinois, for suggesting methods of field work and for much data. 
Edward Barrett, State Geologist of Indiana, contributed of his wide 
knowledge of the geography and geology of the State. Complete freedom 
was granted of all facilities at his disposal for making the investiga- 
tion. Wendell Barrett assisted for a few days in collecting data. W. 
M. Blanchard, Head of the Department of Chemistry, De Pauw Uni- 
versity, Greencastle, Indiana, contributed analyses and identifications. 
H. F. Yancy, Chemist, U. S. Bureau of MineS; Urbana Station, made 
analyses of several samples. Courtesy was extended by mine operators 
at every mine visited. Miners and other citizens extended uniform as- 
sistance. The Grasselli Chemical Company, of Cleveland, Ohio, and E. 
Rauh & Sons Fertilizer Company, of Indianapolis, Indiana, submitted 
valuable opinions and analyses. 

MINERALOGY AND CHEMISTRY OF PYRITE 

Pyrites, "fools' gold," "sulphur," "sulphur balls," "kidney sulphur," 
"cat faces," "coal brasses" are a few local and common names by w^hich 



222 Year Book 

pyrite is known. It is found as an accessory mineral in fresh exposures 
of essentially all ages and kinds of rock. Chemically it is iron di- 
sulphide, and when pure contains 46.6 per cent of iron and 53.4 per cent 
of sulphur. Its chemical symbol is Fe S2. 

The crystal habit of pyrite is usually some form of cube, pyrito- 
hedron, octohedron or combinations. When pure and clean it varies from 
silvery to bronze or brassy yellow in color. In crystals it will scratch 
glass but is fairly brittle and gives off brilliant sparks when struck with 
a hammer or pick; also the odor of burning sulphur may be detected due 
to the heat generated by the blow setting fire to particles. 

Another mineral identical in composition with pyrite is marcasite. 
There is no quick and sure method of telling one from the other except 
by well defined crystals of either which are rare, and by the color when 
perfectly fresh. In general, marcasite favors the tabular form of 
crystalline aggregate belonging to the orthorhombic system and is 
lighter in color. It has been generally assumed, and probably rightly, 
that marcasite oxidizes more rapidly than pyrite. But, as pointed out by 
Stokes^ other conditions such as fineness of division and exposure to 
oxidizing agents are seldom identical, to identify iron di-sulphid as mar- 
casite simply because it oxidizes rapidly, is not a safe method. In the 
following discussion all iron di-sulphid will be called pyrite as consider- 
able laboratory work would be necessary to determine with any accuracy 
just what proportion of each mineral is present in the coals, and if de- 
termined would be more of academic than of commercial importance. 

COAL PYRITE AND ITS ALTERATION 

When freshly broken the pyrite masses from the coals of Indiana 
vary in color from steel gray to bronze yellow, or rarely brassy yellow. 
They vary from coarse to fine granular, the size of granules from one- 
thousandth to one-fourth inch in diameter. Well defined crystals are 
rare. A few good specimens of cubes and pj/ritohedrons were collected 
from cracks in the balls or niggerheads in Seam No. 5, and a few tabu- 
lar crystals suggestive of orthorhombic shapes from the shales above 
the same seam. Well shaped crystals are locally known as "coal dia- 
monds." Other than noted above, the masses of pyrite are largely struc- 
tureless except as may be pointed out in more detail in the pages follow- 
ing. 

When exposed to the air and moisture a tarnish develops rapidly and 
the whole pyrite mass is soon coated with white iron sulphate or cop- 
peras, which is soluble in water. Free sulphuric acid also forms along 
with copperas. These give an acrid, bitter taste to the altered pyrite. 

Not uncommonly a black sulphur zone, an intimate mixture of car- 
bonaceous material and finely divided pyrite, is found as a transition 
from a pure portion of a pyrite mass to the including coal. This alters 
very quickly. Specimens collected and left about for only three weeks 
had altered so badly that the outer portions shelled off, destroying sur- 
face features for which they were collected. It is probably to this finely 
divided pyrite that rapid heating and spontaneous combustion of coals is 
due. In general as the surface (mass) factor increases, the rapidity of 

1 stokes. H. N., Bulletin 186, U. S. G. S.. p. 13. 



Geology and Natural Resources 223 

alteration increases in proportion. This is a well known law of oxida- 
tion. 

Gob piles both in the mine and on the surface contribute evidence 
of the changes that take place in pyrite on exposure to air and moisture. 
If the mine is relatively dry a coating of white copperas (iron sulphate) 
forms on the faces of the coal, especially where pyrite in any form is 
abundant. So common is this that use was made of it in locating lenses 
and bands in older faces of coal along roadways and in rooms. Often 
when these white spots were struck with the hammer the hard lens 
or band was revealed beneath. This may accumulate from zones of but 
slight pyrite content. Aggregates of delicate white to yellow needle- 
like crystals are common. Occasionally where moisture is more abun- 
dant they are tinted a delicate blufe green. Fibrous melanterite in silky 
masses was found in several gob piles. 

Where water is more abundant, the iron sulphate and sulphuric acid 
formed by the oxidation of the pyrites is carried away in the mine waters, 
attacking pipes, rails and tools so rapidly that they are rendered unfit 
for use in a short time. Waters from the mines in No. Ill seam in the 
region of Seeleyville, Indiana, and Staunton, Indiana, are especially 
acid. Under suitable conditions after forming, the copperas and free 
acid attacks and breaks down the aluminum silicates in the clays, forming 
complex salts of varying composition. 

When much lime is present the copperas reacts with it to form gyp- 
sum and iron carbonate. A portion of the iron is altered to the basic 
condition, giving a yellow or rusty coating in ditches carrying mine 
waters away. The removal of pyrite from mines is generally desirable, 
for in gob piles with a high percentage of coal and pyrite both on top 
and below ground fires are not uncommon. In some mines the heating 
is so marked that the temperature of the mine air is not uncommonly 
increased. Various gases freed by the spontaneous heating of pyrite and 
coal vitiate the air. It is a common occurrence to have to seal off these 
fires. Gob fires, where combustion is slow, often distill free sulphur from 
the pyrite, forming miniature fumeroles about which delicate needles 
of yellow monoclinic sulphur collect. 

In such cases oxidation of the iron is often complete and rounded 
masses of pure hematite (F2 O3) may be found as the residue of a 
lens or "sulphur ball." The red color of burned gob piles is an evidence 
of the complete oxidation of the iron. 

OTHER COMBINATIONS OF SULPHUR IN COAL 

Not all sulphur occurs in coal as pyrite. Coal is undoubtedly of or- 
ganic origin, mostly vegetable. It is well known that vegetable matter 
contains sulphur combined organically and best detected by chemical 
analysis. It seems quite probable that some sulphur in coal is so com- 
bined. A white thin scale is often noted in vertical joint cracks in coal. 
This is often largely gypsum— CaS042 H2O. Sulphates of magnesium, 
aluminum and other metallic elements are often present in small 
amounts. The above forms usually represent but a small fraction of 
one per cent of the coal. They have no commercial significance. 

In general it may be said that coal pyrite oxidizes rapidly, forming 



224 Year Book 

soluble salts of iron and other metals and is carried away eventually 
in the waters to be redeposited in some more insoluble and stable form 
in a locality possibly at some distance from the mines. 

OCCURRENCE OF PYRITE ASSOCIATED WITH THE COALS OF INDIANA 

The following classification of pyrite aggregates in the coal seams of 
Indiana is based on physical resemblance. The order is based on their 
probable commercial importance. 

1. Bands and Lenses. Pyrite bodies of recoverable size in coal are 
usually lens shaped as are most ore bodies. When a lens is very long 
for its thickness it is usually called a band. There is no evidence that 
most lenses and bands differ in composition and origin. They lie flatwise 
or parallel to the bedding planes of the coal. Most bands thicken and 
thin much as a series of lenses joined edge to edge. Where lenses 
and bands lie between shale and coal, the shale side is often knobby 
while the coal side is relatively smooth. In places in the coal, pyrite 
bands may be continuous for 15 to 20 feet, and in the aggregate weigh 
several hundred pounds. As broken by mining the average size is 
from one to three inches in thickness and weighs from five to twenty- 
five pounds with an average of about ten pounds exclusive of the coal 
that adheres as broken by mining. 

Their color is usually a dull stone gray to bronze, and fine grained. 
Smaller bands of from a knife edge to one-fourth inch in thickness are 
often lustrous, shiny and coarsely granular. They usually break up 
badly on shooting the coal and little is recoverable. 

Bands are best developed in Seam No. Ill in the region of Clinton, 
Indiana, and Rosedale, Indiana. Here they are usually sharply defined 
from the coal or clay, sometimes with a zone varying in thickness from 
1/16 inch to U. inch of shiny pyrite between the coal and the dull stony 
portion of the band. Minute veins of shiny pyrite often cut them trans- 
versely, suggesting a secondary enlargement and filling at a later stage. 
Seam No. Ill is divided at about the middle with a parting of impuri- 
ties that varies in composition from gray clay or shale to blackjack, 
sandstone, sandstone cemented with pyrite to pure pyrite bands and 
varying in thickness from 2 to 12 inches. In some localities two or 
more partings were noted, but this one midway is most persistent. 

Pyrite lenses and bands are often present just under this dirty band. 
They are often found between the roof and coal especially where the 
roof is shale. 

Two other persistent zones of lenses and bands are common in Seam 
No. III. The upper from 10 inches to 12 inches below the roof and the 
lower 6 inches to 10 inches above the bottom. Scattered lenses, in gen- 
eral more abundant in the lower half of the coal, make up about half 
of the recoverable pyrite from this seam. 

Bands are also found in Seam No. VI and form a considerable por- 
tion of the recoverable pyrite from the mines east and southeast of 
Shelbourne, Indiana. In this area two shale partings are quite per- 
sistent, the upper 24-26 inches, the second 30-34 inches below the top of 
the coal. The pyrite bands may be above but are more commonly be- 
low the second shale parting. Occasionally the shale gives place to a 



Geology and Natural Resources 225 

pyrite band only, for distances of several feet, then again the position 
of the parting may be indicated only by impure dull black coal from 
one-quarter to one inch in thickness. 

The bands are uniformly high grade pyrite. The fragments as 
broken by mining are commonly from one to one and one-half inches 
thick and twenty to one hundred inches square in lateral area. They 
are finely granular and silvery to stone gray in color. 

Occasionally bands, instead of being set off sharply from the coal, 
show a transition through a black zone of coaly matter and finely di- 
vided pyrite to the dull stony portion of the lens or band. 

2. Flattened lenses without definite structure. Throughout seams 
Nos. Ill, V and VI are scattere(^ lenses of pyrite varying in size from 
a few ounces to 100 pounds or more. They are commonly stone gray and 
lusterless on fresh fracture, to steel gray or bronze colored. They may 
or may not show transition zones of interseamed coal and pyrite or fine 
grains of coal and pyrite, and are seemingly distributed promiscuously. 
In a few cases they are definitely associated with shale bands, but so 
rarely as to give no clue to the law controlling their occurrence. In 
seams Nos. V and VI they are probably more abundant in the lower 
half of the coal. Being uniformly present in all seams examined and 
whenever tested showing a high sulphur content — 42 per cent to 46 per 
cent — as roughly cleaned by hand — they may be considered as an im- 
portant source of pyrite. 

3. Nigger-heads, boulders, balls or kidneys. Seam No. V contains 
masses of more or less pure pyrite in the form of nigger-heads, boulders, 
balls or kidneys, which seem to be names applied in different localities 
to the same occurrence. As the names suggest, they are either nearly 
spherical or spheroidal rather than lense shaped, although all grada- 
tions between may be found. 

They may be found in any position in the coal, but probably are 
more abundant near the bottom. They are found in this seam wherever 
examined. They range in size from 1 to 4,000 pounds or more, a typical 
one being shown in Plate — . Many of these pyritized boulders show 
open cracks on breaking, the cracks being more or less lined or filled 
with crystalline pyrite. This often gives a porous or spongy appearance 
to the mass. Some good specimens of pyrite crystals with pyritohedron 
faces were collected from these. 

In general the smaller sizes, from 1 to 15 pounds in weight, are a 
good grade of pyrite, and not uncommonly those weighing upwards of 
100 pounds may be found that are nearly pure pyrite. Although very 
large ones (150-4,000 pounds) are usually more or less pure calcium 
carbonate with the outer portions replaced by pyrite and with dendrites 
of shiny pyrite extending inward. Occasionally they may contain rather 
high percentages of iron as carbonate or hydrated oxide. The follow- 
ing typical partial analysis shows the most important constituents : 

Sulphur 11.51% 

Iron Oxide 15. % 

Calcium Oxide 39.54% 

Carbon Dioxide 32.12% 

(Analysis by W. M. Blanchard.) 
15—13956 



226 Year Book 

This sample was taken from a large boulder weighing about two 
hundred pounds that came from about the middle of the No. V seam in 
the American Mine No. 1 at Bicknell, Indiana. It is an average sample 
of the outer three to four inches of the boulder and probably shows a 
higher percentage of sulphur than an average of the whole boulder. 

The large size of- the boulders in one portion of the American Mine 
is notable. In a sag or depression in the coal seam 250-300 feet in 
diameter were several dozen boulders, including individual boulders that 
would weigh upward of 4,000 pounds. This locality was the only one 
where they were found in such abundance or so large. 

In the region north and west of Terre Haute, Seam No. V could 
contribute a considerable quantity of these balls or boulders of a good 
grade of pyrite. An analysis of one of the more doubtful quality from 
the Sugar Valley Mine at West Terre Haute, showed 32.9 per cent 
sulphur. When broken, this boulder, weighing about 40 pounds, showed 
bronze colored pyrite with streaks of brown carbonate in the nature of 
flat slab-like masses, resembling the flattened stems of plants, 1/16-^/4 
inch thick and 2 to 4 inches long. The mass exhibited a tendency to 
cleave along these slabs. 

In general the small and purer boulders or balls will yield a pyrite 
product containing upward of 40 per cent sulphur if some care and 
experience is used in selection. From the outside a casual examina- 
tion will not reveal their nature. As breaking entails a considerable 
amount of work it would seem best to make a careful examination of 
many of them for each mine to find the limit of size that would best 
be included as recoverable. Since most of the pyrite impurity is cal- 
cium carbonate, the pyrite could probably be freed from the lime by 
washing machinery if adapted to the purpose. In that case all sizes 
of boulders from the coal seam might be considered as a potential supply 
of pyrite. 

The nature of these boulders suggests that they probably formed in 
part as calcium carbonate concretions in the swamp while the peaty ma- 
terial, which later became coal, was accumulating. Perhaps coarse 
masses of stems and other vegetable matter may have served to start 
the segregation of lime. Later, these lime concretions were replaced 
wholly or partly by iron disulphide. Many of the smaller balls prob- 
ably are true concretions of iron disulphid and not replacements. 

4. Nodules in coal and associated clay. While many or most struc- 
tureless lenses and bands mentioned on page 220 are probably 
nodular in nature as the term is usually used, true and unmistakable 
nodules are found in the lower 18 inches of roof shale above No. VI 
coal, especially in Sullivan and Knox counties. 

In shape they are oval to arborescent and often knobby, occasionally 
thick lens shaped nearly circular in outline. When broken they vary 
from coarsely to fine granular and seldom if ever show concentric struc- 
ture. In size' they vary from a few ounces up to several hundred 
pounds in weight. 

In composition they show a uniform high percentage of sulphur, 
(46.05% at Bicknell, Indiana), and rarely carry a minute percentage 
of zinc, probably as sphalerite (ZnS). 



Geology and Natural Resources 227 

Besides nodules, much finely divided pyrite was noted, especially 
in the lower six inches of the roof shale. The rapidity with which this 
weathers accounts for much of the shelling-off falls that are so trouble- 
some in many mines working this coal, especially where considerable 
moisture is present. 

It is not uncommon to find these nodules surrounded by a film or 
layer of clay that causes them when damp to break easily from the 
containing coal or clay. Their ease of separation together with their 
high sulphur content make them a hopeful source of pyrite. 

5. Petrifactions of trunk and stem fragments. Coal seams Nos. 
Ill and VI contributed specimens in abundance that show petrifac- 
tions of casts of tree trunk and stem fragments. Some of these show 
them to have been first petrifiedx with calcium carbonate and later in 
part or totally pyritized. Fragments in all stages from pure cal- 
cium carbonate to pure pyrite were noted with the leaf scar arrange- 
ment of the lepidodendron and striations of the calamites. It is likely 
that many were directly replaced with pyrite. They furnish a consider- 
able percentage of recoverable pyrite, especially in Coal No. Ill and VI, 
in Sullivan, Vigo and Clay Counties. When these fragments lie about 
exposed to the weathering and the adhering coal and other matter 
separates they resemble nothing more than weathered fragments of 
wood often carrying the illusion to the grain and splinters. They are 
often about the size and shape of a man's forearm to flattened chip- 
like, weighing from 3 to 15 pounds. They are of uniform high grade 
with exception where replacement of calcium carbonate is incomplete, 
which is rather rare, examples of which were noted in Coal No. Ill 
in the region of Seeleyville, Indiana, and Staunton, Indiana. 

6. Roof boulders above Coal Seam No. V. Allied to the boulders 
found in Coal No. V, just described, are the oval concretionary boulders 
that form a conspicuous feature of the roof above Coal No. V. They are 
embedded in a block fossiliferous, fissile shale and often jut down- 
ward into the coal, occasionally making removal necessary, especially 
in roadways and entries. Sometimes they fall, leaving an inverted 
smooth^ pot-like depression in the roof. They vary in weight from a 
few pounds to three or four tons. Commonly their shape is spherical 
or spheroidal although they may be elongated until their length is 
several times their width. Often two or more are grown together, giv- 
ing a knobby or branching effect. In general they exhibit all the forms 
of true lime or iron-stone concretions found commonly in shales else- 
where but on a very enlarged scale. Not uncommonly they show a de- . 
pression in top or bottom. They invariably lie with the flattened por- 
tion parallel to the bedding of the shale. Many of them are somewhat 
conical on the lower side with adhering shale or clay, the sides of the 
flat cone showing slickensides as though developed by thrusting the 
boulder downward into the shale or clay. They often carry mollusc 
and molluscoidia fossil remains, but in general are structureless. Oc- 
casionally they are broken and recemented by calcite, silica, gypsum or 
pyrite resembling septaria. 

Those that jut downward into the coal are commonly partially re- 
placed by pyrite either frequently as a skin or shell or at the center. It 



228 Year Book 

is common to find an irregular mass or bleb of pyrite on the lower part 
of the boulder weighing several pounds, but not easily separated from 
the boulder. This pyrite merges with the replacement shell that ex- 
tends upward and around the lower half. In general the further these 
jut downward into the coal the more completely they are replaced with 
pyrite. Fossil remains are often gilded or replaced on the interior of 

the boulder while the mass shows little or no replacement. Plate 

shows one of these shells or skins, and Fig. 2 a typical boulder unbroken. 

These boulders probably formed as true calcium concretions on the 
bottom of a muddy lagoon or estuary deep enough or protected to escape 
agitation in the general period immediately following the deposition of 
the coal. A stratum of from 0-8 inches of comminuted shells and coaly 
matter with clay just above the coal suggests that the swamp in which 
the coal formed was submerged rather rapidly and conditions favorable 
for the accumulation of plant remains gave place to a more or less 
open sea rich in calcium carbonate. 

The pyrite associated with these roof boulders probably has little 
commercial importance, because the pyrite if recovered would either 
have to be. hammered from the boulder in place or the boulder removed. 
But few of the boulders are removed in mining, except such as fall or are 
in the way. Again, the amount of pyrite that is associated with the 
boulder is but a small fraction of the total weight of the boulders. 

7. Pyrite associated with mineral charcoal or mother of coal. There 
is a striking relation existing between mineral charcoal and pyrite. 
Masses of mineral charcoal are frequently impregnated with pyrite, 
from filling minute pores to complete pyritization. The satiny lustre 
of this material makes it at once one of the most beautiful occurrences 
of pyrite. While in general the quantity of pyrite present is small, 
in a few cases the replacement has been so complete as to make lens 
like bodies of nearly pure pyrite. 

The quantity of this class of pyrite is not large commercially and 
was noted mostly abundant in Coal No. V in the region of Bruceville, 
Indiana, Bicknell, Indiana, and Wheatland, Indiana, although found 
occasionally in Seams III and VI as well. 

8. Minor occurrences. "Cat faces" or veins formed in vertical 
joint planes or cracks in the coal are found in all coals of Indiana. They 
are most abundant in Seam No. Ill in Park, Vermillion, Vigo, Sullivan, 
Clay and Greene counties and in Seam No. V from Sullivan County south- 
ward, rather increasing in number toward the Ohio River, and to a 
minor extent in Seam No. VI wherever found. 

Many minute branching veins coalesce to form a fairly solid vein 
for several inches only to branch again and lose themselves in the body 
of the coal. Most of the pyrite is coarsely granular and seldom attains 
a thickness of % - % inch in the solid vein. 

Due to their granular nature and lying as they do along cleavage 
lines in the coal, they are usually broken into fine fragments by shoot- 
ing or pick work and are mixed with the fine coal. When large enough 
t© be detected and thrown out they usually form less than 10 per cent 
by weight of the discarded lump of the coal. For these reasons they 



Geology and Natural Resources 229 

are not considered of commercial importance except as coal which is 
wasted might be recovered with them. 

Joint veins are often continuous with zones of fine interleaved py- 
rite lying parallel with the bedding. Interleaved zones from one inch 
to several inches in thickness are fairly common in Seams III, V and 
VI. It is seldom the total pyrite which is in minute leaves and bands 
reach a total of 25 per cent by weight of the zone. When these zones 
are large and noticeable, lumps of coal are usually discarded on account 
of them. A large percentage of coal so discarded from Seam No. V in 
Knox County and southward is on account of these zones. A typical 
discarded lump of coal may shov/ in section tv/o to five times as much 
coal as pyrite impregated zone. The zone itself being often less than 
25 per cent by weight pyrite, makes the per cent of pyrite in the lump 
very low. This with the finely divided condition of the pyrite would 
make fine crushing necessary to separate the coal and pyrite, a pro- 
cedure that would entail the loss of the coal. With the coal lost the 
pyrite recovered would not repay the expense. This occurrence is there- 
fore not considered as commercially important at present. 

Thin scales or leaves of pyrite both along cleavage planes and 
joints, may be noted in all the coal of Indiana. They are unimportant 
to the present discussion. 

OTHER OCCURRENCE OF PYRITE IN INDIANA 

Pyrite is a common accessory mineral in sedimentary rocks. The 
native rocks of Indiana are all sedimentary and contain fully a normal 
amount of pyrite. 

The Knobstone shales contain small nodules of pyrites and limonite 
as ironstones scattered through the shales — at no known locality in 
commercial quantity at the present price. Certain shales of Carboni- 
ferous age, especially those in association with the coals, contain varying 
amounts of pyrite either as grains, nodules or replacements. 

Upon weathering pyrite is one of the first minerals to lose its identity 
as explained on page — . Exposures of shales, sandstones and lime- 
stones are often stained brown by the iron oxide resulting from its 
decay. 

At no known locality in the State other than that in coal where 
it is already mined does it offer inducements for its recovery. That such 
other places may be discovered is entirely probable, especially if prices 
remain high enough to offer a stimulus for prospecting for it. 

DISTRIBUTION AND AMOUNT OF PYRITE RECOVERABLE FROM THE COALS OF 

INDIANA 

There are few if any coals that do not show sulphur upon chemical 
analysis. It varies in coals of Indiana frpm .89%* for No. IV seam 
to 5.14%^ for Seam No. Ill as mined. 

As all impurities that are discarded in mining are not included in 
analysis the maximum sulphur content may reach as much as 10 per 

1 Lord, N. W., Bui. 22, Pt. I, U. S. B. of Mines, 1913, p. 96. 

2 Ibid., p. 97. 



230 Year Book 

cent if all sulphur bearing minerals were included. Most of the pyrite, 
either in aggregates that are easily seen or that may be selected by their 
superior weight, is discarded by the miner in the rooms or thrown out 
by pickers on the railroad cars or picking belts. It is obvious that this 
report has most to do with this material so discarded, hence little 
use could be made of analyses in estimating the quantity of pyrite. 

Low sulphur content is to be desired by operators, as any con- 
siderable quantity is considered deleterious and in ordinary times makes 
the coal hard to sell in a competitive market. A chemical analysis does 
not always reveal much of the nature of the sulphur in coal; it is 
rather more important to find out in what combinations the sulphur 
is found. If mostly in fine well disseminated particles or thin leaves of 
pyrite its combustion is usually complete,^ generating about one-half as 
much heat as an equal bulk of coal. If in the form of lenses or ag- 
gregates of appreciable size it clinkers badly with corrosive effects on 
iron grate bars. In either case the fumes corrode the flues of boilers. 
The iron adds to the weight of ash. 

GENERAL NOTES ON THE DISTRIBUTION AND QUALITY OF PYRITE IN THE COALS 

OF INDIANA 

Plate shows the areal distribution of recoverable pyrite where 

data are fairly complete. With few exceptions only mines with rail- 
road connections and employing ten or more men were studied. This 
will account for the grouping of the areas on railroads. It is probably 
safe to assume that the undeveloped coal territory not as yet served by 
railroads contains quantities of pyrite similar to the areas that haVe 
been or are being worked, hence a map showing recoverable pyrite 
would be essentially coincident with a map showing the areal distribu- 
tion of Seams III, V, and VI. In this connection the chart accompany- 
ing the supplementary report on the coal of Indiana, by George N. 

Ashley may be consulted. The areas shown on Plate will, no doubt, 

be added to as knowledge is extended by the opening up of new coal 
territory. 

COAL SEAM NO III 

On an average. Seam No. Ill in Parke, Vermillion, Vigo, Greene and 
Clay counties, Indiana, shows the highest percentages of recoverable 
pyrite. 

In the region of Rosedale, Indiana, and Clinton, Indiana, this seam 
will produce from 6 per cent to 8 per cent of the tonnage mined as 
bands and lenses of high grade pyrite that separates easily from the 
associated shale on coal. As mined the fragments of bands and lenses 
weigh from 5 to 10 pounds commonly, with about an equal weight of 
adhering coal. The large quantity and pure quality of the pyrite from 
this area makes further attention to Coal No. Ill in that vicinity seem 
worth while if an adequate market could be secured for the pyrite. 

Coal No. Ill is mined in the vicinity of Seeleyville, Indiana, and 
Staunton, Indiana, and near Burnett, Indiana. At all of these lo- 
calities the quantity is less than further northwest but still worthy of 

•Ibid., p. 31. 



Geology and Natural Resources 281 

attention. In the Franklin-Tandy-Lowish mine at Staunton, Indiana, 
a few masses were found which are probably casts of tree trunks or 
stem fragments, originally of calcium carbonate and then later replaced 
by pyrite. The replacement is not always complete and occasionally 
these masses are impure. Such casts form rather a negligible part of 
the total pyrite, hence what few contain calcium carbonate would not 
materially reduce the quality of the whole. An average sample of 
lenses from the Willow Creek Mine at Seeleyville, Indiana, showed 
41.31 per cent sulphur. 

At Jasonville, Indiana, and Midland, Indiana, the lenses of purer 
pyrite from Seam No. Ill are commonly large and often break from the 
coal entire. Such large masses may weigh up to 100 pounds or more, 
with a center of rather pure ^tone-gray pyrite surrounded with a 
transition zone of from 2 to 4 inches of black interleaved coaly matter 
and pyrite or fine grains of pyrite and impure coal. These zones are 
not easily separated from the pure portion by hammering when fresh, 
but when allowed to weather either in the mine or at the surface for a 
few weeks, the outer impure portions shell off leaving the central mass 
as high grade pyrite. To test the quality of these lenses even when 
fresh, samples were taken with the following results: 

1. Sample from several lenses from Island Valley, No. IV Mine, 
Jasonville, Indiana. This sample was taken from fresh lenses just mined 
and represented the quality of pyrite by hand cleaning. To the eye a 
considerable portion of black transition pyrite was included. Result, 
44.96% sulphur. 

2. A similar sample from the Tower Hill Mine at Midland, Indiana, 
from fresh lenses roughly cleaned by hand of adhering impure coal. 
Result, 42.27% sulphur. 

3. Same locality as 2, but sample from purer portions of similar 
lenses exposed to the weathering for three months. The outer inter- 
leaved zone essentially all crumbled off. Result, 46.07% sulphur. 

The difference between the sulphur content of 2 and 3 is notable. 
It seems to show that these black looking masses of pyrite commonly 
found in the above locality are high grade pyrite and deceptive to the 
eye. Such lenses if put through a washer as suggested on pages 236-239, 
following, would concentrate to a high grade product without doubt. 
The black transition zones would probably appear as jig middlings and 
would necessitate rather fine crushing to recover most of pyrite con- 
tained. 

Due to the presence of considerable amounts of clay, shale and rock 
impurities interbedded with Coal No. Ill, the gob piles both in the mine 
and on the surface are relatively large. In the mine the pyrite is 
thrown back with the other impurities in the rooms and is badly mixed 
with them. This would make recovery of the pyrite in old works diffi- 
cult. Immediate sorting while mining would be advisable if the pyrite 
is to be recovered. Above ground the gob commonly burns except where 
tipple discards are hauled away and spread out. Where this is done 
the solid pyrite portions of these lenses have resisted weathering; some- 
times for years. Several hundred tons of such material may be found 
about the surface works of some of the older mines and the newer mines 



232 Year Book 

in proportion. These accumulations are often an important index to the 
quantities of pyrite discarded below ground. 

COAL SEAM NO. VI 

Seam No. VI wherever mined shows a uniformly high quality of 
pyrite, and in quantity probably stands second to Seam No. III. 

No. VI coal is mined most extensively in Sullivan County. Wherever 
mined, the seam is subject to falls of shale from the roof, so that all 
pyrite left in the rooms is buried sooner or later under quantities of 
roof shale. 

An examination of many falls, shows that pyrite in nodules to fine 
grains interspersed through the roof shale contributes more or less to 
these falls, especially the sort where instead of a mass of several tons 
weight falling at once, a shelling off takes place of from one to four 
inches of shale over an area of several square feet. Such slabs are 
probably loosened by the disintegration of pyrite from the action of 
moist air, percolating waters carrying dissolved oxygen and oxidizing 
agents, together with the softening of the clays along laminae. 

Besides the lenses of high grade pyrite in the coal itself, in a few 
localities, notably in the Pan Handle Mine at Bicknell, Indiana, large, 
flat, knobby lenses, or nodules often weighing up to one hundred pounds, 
occur in the lower six inches of the roof shale. After a short exposure 
these lenses fall and are easily recovered. The pyrite is often coarsely 
granular and occasionally carries a small percentage of zinc. Con- 
siderable water is encountered in this mine and not uncommonly the 
lenses of pyrite both in the coal and shale are surrounded with a film 
to one-eighth of an inch of wet clay-like material that on account of 
its weakness allows the lens to break free from the containing coal or 
shale. 

The following two analyses from the Pan Handle Mine show the 
quality of the lenses commonly found in Seam No. VI: 

Sample of lenses and bands in coal — 46.04% sulphur; 

Samples of nodules and lenses from "draw slate" above No. VI coal — 
46.05% sulphur. 

Several hundred tons of discarded pyrite might be recovered about 
the surface plants of the Kolsem Mine No. 4, the Mildred Mine and the 
Peerless Mine, all southeast of Shelbourne, Sullivan County, Indiana, 
and from the Monon No. 15 Mine at Cass, Sullivan County. Most of 
this pyrite is clean lenses and fragments of bands that have weathered 
free from adhering coal and may be regarded as material that needs 
but little preparation other than merely washing off the adhering earth 
and copperas. It is notable in this connection to observe the concen- 
tration of rounded pyrite masses about the margin of high waste dumps 
from mines. When the car of mixed slabs and shale and rounded pyrite 
lenses, usually from roadways or entries, is dumped at the top of the 
pile, the slabs of shale and impure coal slide a short distance and finally 
come to rest while the more nearly spherical masses roll downward and 
accumulate at the margins of the dump. Masses containing pyrite are 
commonly rounded and the quantity of pyrite easily loaded upon a 
wagon or truck about the edges of dumps is worthy of attention. A 



Geology and Natural Resources 283 

periodic cleaning up about these dumps would prevent the pyrite be- 
coming covered by the growth of the pile and the slow creep of the 
shale and clay. 

It would be difficult to recover much pyrite from old workings in 
mines in this coal due to the roof falls of shale and, like the pyrite in 
Seam No. Ill, would best be recovered at the time the coal is removed 
or shortly afterward. 

No dilution of the pyrite masses by calcium carbonate was noted 
in any mines examined. The ease with which the pyrite separates from 
the adhering coal and clay is noteworthy. The pyrite is commonly 
sharply defined from the coal without the transition interleaved zones 
as noted in No. Ill coal and may be considered as of uniform high 
grade. ^ 

SEAM NO. y 

Coal Seam No. V contributes about 60 per cent of the coal mined in 
Indiana. The persistence of workable thickness and the uniformly good 
roof above this seam with the good quality of the coal easily explains its 
lead in tonnage. 

The best grade and largest quantity of recoverable pyrite is found 
in this seam in Vigo, Vermillion and Sullivan counties. Vigo and Ver- 
million counties lead in tonnage of coal mined and also in the percentage 
of recoverable pyrite from No. V coal. The area immediately northwest 
of Terre Haute is especially notable as a source of pyrite. 

Pyrite occurs in the area of the three counties above mentioned as 
lenses and balls or boulders and to a minor degree as bands in the 
coal. Since the occurrence of pyrite has been discussed at some length 
on pages 224-229 details need not be mentioned here aside from calling 
attention to the calcium carbonate present in some of the large boulders 
in this coal. The lenses are quite uniformly high grade even though 
commonly surrounded by transition zones of impure coal and fine grained 
pyrite, and the balls or boulders, if some care is used in selection, will 
easily concentrate to a marketable grade of pyrite as shown on page 
225. 

As was found about mines in No. VI coal, page 232, the dumps about 
the surface of mines in Coal No. V may be worthy of attention. The 
concentration of pyrite about the margins of dumps is even more notable 
than in No. VI, as the balls and boulders often roll to some distance 
about the edges of the dumps. The roof boulders removed, which are 
not regarded as recoverable pyrite, exhibit the same tendency, hence 
the concentrations are not always as high grade as those about dumps 
from No. VI coal. 

But little shale or clay is interbedded with the coal. The gob piles 
in the rooms are mostly crude pyrite. Where the coal is four feet or 
less in thickness it is necessary to take up several inches of the bottom 
clay to make sufficient clearance for the pit cars. This clay is thrown 
back and usually covers the pyrite discarded during mining. This is 
necessary at only a few localities as the bulk of the seam where worked 
is thick enough to allow easy mining. 

The mines are quite dry and the roof good, so that much pyrite 



234 Year Book 

might be recovered from old workings if the market price were high 
enough to justify relaying tracks that have been removed. 

Knox, Daviess, Gibson, Pike, Vanderburgh and Warrick Counties, 
Seam No. V in Knox County and southward shows a marked increase 
in diffused and scattered leaves and grains of pyrite and a similar de- 
crease in lenses and bands of recoverable size, the change becoming 
more marked as the Ohio River is approached. Chemical analysis of 
Coal No. V probably would show but little difference in the sulphur 
that enters into such analyses, between the northern and southern por- 
tions of the State. 

Balls, lenses and bands are present in this area but much fewer 
than in the northern area just described. 

Zones of interleaved pyrite from one to four inches thick are rather 
the rule. These zones are continuous and parallel to the bedding. 
They are rarely accompanied by shiny granular pyrite bands from one- 
fourth to three-eighths inch thick. As many as four or five zones 
may be encountered in a working face. If the zones are large and promi- 
nent they are discarded, if small they are seldom noticed and prob- 
ably do no material harm in the marketed coal. Coal discarded on ac- 
count of these zones in the mine may reach a total of three to four per 
cent of the total coal mined. 

The pyrite content of these zones is low, often not over ten or 
fifteen per cent of the total coal lump discarded and is commonly less 
than fifty per cent. The lumps of coal discarded, consequently, have a 
low pyrite content — from two to ten per cent. 

Any method looking to the recovery of the lenses and balls would 
have to include close sorting of the material discarded unless the 
recovery of the coal from low grade zoned pyrite should be of more 
consequence than of the pyrite. Fine grinding would be necessary to 
free the pyrite from these zones; in that case the coal would probably 
be reajidered useless. 

The lenses and balls though present in limited quantities are of 
good grade. Joint veins or "cat faces" are vertical pyrite veins that 
occupy the vertical joints common in coals. They seldom attain a 
thickness or size to be of importance but are present in rather in- 
creasing numbers southward in No. V seam as the Ohio River is ap- 
proached. 

Aside from the lenses and balls the bulk of coal discarded on ac- 
count of pyrite in Knox County and southward may hardly be regarded 
as a resource. It would be a direct contribution to the conservation of 
our coal if this waste might be saved. 

OTHER SEAMS 

Seam No. IV contributes probably less free pyrite than any other 
coal. Occasionally the seam shows rather high pyrite content, but these 
localities are so rare as to make it advisable to disregard all coal pro- 
duced from this seam as a potential supply of pyrite. Where exam- 
ined a few thin leaves, both parallel to the bedding and in joint cracks, 
were noted. Other than this it is quite free from this impurity. 



Geology and Natural Resources 235 

The block coals and Minshall seams contain a small percentage of 
recoverable pyrite in the form of lenses and thin bands. 

In the block coals the quantity is greatest near "troubles," clay- 
filled channels in the coal, and near faults. In the Minshall, the pyrite 
is found mostly between the coal and roof, or at the bottom of the 
coal. 

The tonnage of coal is small from both of the above seams and hence 
essentially negligible in considering the pyrite supply. 

Seam No. VII is mined in a small way but in two or three localities, 
one of which was examined. It contains no appreciable amount of re- 
coverable pyrite so far as known. 

Seam No. VIII is mined in only one or two localities locally; The 
recoverable pyrite is negligible. 

During the past year considerable interest has been directed toward 
abandoned mines, especially in coals that on account of the large amount 
of impurities or difficult physical conditions were not able to complete 
profitably under pre-war conditions. Several old mines have been re- 
opened. New mines have been developed under the stimulus of un- 
limited demand for coal, in localities that were considered unfavorable. 
Stripping, or open pit mining, has increased rapidly until at least nine 
plants were in operation August 1st, 1918. Only one of these. The Cen- 
tral Indiana Collieries Co., of Dugger, has equipment for the consistent 
recovery of pyrite, the others picking pyrite from railroad cars as the 
coal is loaded by steam shovel, or 'sorting in the pit if loaded by hand. 

tonnage available 

Based on ability to operate two hundred fifty days per year the coal 
mines of Indiana employing over ten men could produce about 225,000 
tons (2,000 lbs.) of pyrite per year. As the mines in the northern por- 
tion of the field where recoverable pyrite is most abundant have prob- 
ably been operating on an average of nearly three hundred days per 
year, the minimum estimate of pyrite recoverable might be safely placed 
at about 250,000 tons per year if all were utilized. 

As it would seem unwise, at present at least, to try to utilize crude 
pyrite where fine grinding would be necessary to concentrate the prod- 
uct, or where the recovery of a low grade product would interfere seri- 
ously with coal output, this would still leave upward of 150,000 tons per 
year from mines that would contribute a consistent tonnage of crude 
pyrite containing 50 per cent or more pyi'ite. 

A considerable amount of pyrite is to be found about the surface of 
many mines. Much is still recoverable from old works in mines. No 
definite estimate could be made as time and conditions did not allow. 
Falls and oxidation has made much pyrite unavailable. Tracks removed 
could only be relaid at considerable expense and labor. In general it 
may be safely estimated that from the two sources fully 50,000 tons 
could be made immediately available. Some experienced operators have 
regarded this figure as very conservative. 

This would make a total of about 200,000 tons from less than ninety 
mines or considerably less than half of the mines of the State employ- 
ing over ten men. 



236 Year Book 

Attention should be further called to the fact that the figures above 
are for pyrite only and if recovered by a pyrite washery utilizing the 
crude as it comes from the mine, a tonnage of coal that is now left in 
the mine almost equal to the above would be added to the output of the 
State. 

THE RECOVERY OF PYRITE FROM COAL 

A few hundred tons of "coal brasses" have been marketed, from the 
coals of Indiana in the past few years. Most of it has been shipped to 
nearby acid plants and utilized for the manufacture of fertilizers. No 
considerable industry has been established, due to the cost of cleaning 
by hand and the resulting rather low grade of product that did not 
readily compete with imported clean pyrite. . A few small mines utilized 
idle days to "clean sulphur" or the work was farmed out to superan- 
nuated employes. In many cases the owners and operators received 
nothing for it. But small amounts were recovered from the workings, 
most of it coming from accumulations from discards at the tipple. Only 
a few mines are equipped with picking tables or conveyors, or chutes 
from which pyrite might be loaded. Sporadic attempts have been made 
to establish the industry, it being reported that a machine for preparing 
pyrite was once in operation near Clinton. 

Most operators have been apathetic toward its recovery, as the price 
offered was too low to allow a profit by methods then in use. Mines 
were primarily equipped to handle but one product — coal — and that as 
cheaply as possible. Anything that appeared to add to the difficulty of 
recovering coal was not welcomed by the operators. No scale of pay 
for miners loading out pyrite has been adopted in Indiana. 

In all, operators felt they had troubles enough without inviting more 
by. dabbling in the questionable recovery of pyrite. 

The developments of the past year and a half have demonstrated that 
pyrite can be recovered profitably from coal. The problems involved 
are not insurmountable. The reader is referred to the following pub- 
lications: "The Utilization of Pyrite Occurring in Illinois Bituminous 
Coal," by E. A. Holbrook; Circular No. 5 of the Engineering Experiment 
Station of the University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois; and a description 
of the pyrite washery near Danville, Illinois, by C. M. Young, in Coal 
Age, Vol. XI, No. 1, p. 7, Jan. 6, 1917. Since 1916 other plants have 
been built, until it may be said the industry is in a fair way of becoming 
established. 

Hand cleaning alone is unprofitable and impracticable, due to labor 
shortage and a product that is badly contaminated with coal that in- 
creases the niter consumption in the chamber process and tends to pro- 
duce a dark colored acid that is found objectionable for certain purposes, 
though no objection is made for the manufacture of fertilizer. The 
market is unsettled and production fitful. 

Pyrite washeries or mills to prepare clean marketable pyrite and the 
accompanying coal cheaply from crude pyrite — masses of pyrite and 
adhering coal — are being operated successfully. They may be built at a 
reasonable price, as the machinery necessary is simple and capable of 
being operated with unskilled labor. A flow sheet for such a plant is 



Geology and Natural Resources 237 

shown on page 239. Tests on Indiana coal pyrite in a similar plant are 
given also on page 241. The successful recovery of coal pyrite has 
passed the experimental stage. 

The advantages in being able to take the crude pyrite with adher- 
ing coal as discarded by the miner without further preparation other 
than throwing it into piles separated from clay and other rock, loading 
it out in a manner similar to handling coal and then upon cars like 
mine-run coal, would appeal to both miner and operator. 

Most operators would be glad to be rid of it as cheaply as possible, 
for if left in the mine it heats, developing harmful fumes and causes 
gob fires. If the mine is wet it adds quantities of free sulphuric acid 
and copperas to the mine watei^s that injure steel and iron equipment. 
Operators generally would regard its removal with satisfaction, especial- 
ly if it could be removed with a profit. 

The general opinion of miners was that it could be removed without 
sxcessive labor. It costs powder to mine it and labor to handle it and at 
present is largely left in rooms. They would generally welcome its dis- 
posal at a fair price for their labor. 

suggestions for possible future recovery of pyrite 

In reply to questions of practicable methods that might be employed 
looking to the recovery of pyrite where the quantity would justify the 
attempt, m_any sensible suggestions were offered and may be summarized 
here. 

As most mines are equipped with screens only below the scales, with 
no picking tables or belts, and equipped to produce either screened sizes 
or minerun, if pyrite is to be loaded out whenever the miner finds time or- 
his accumulated crude pyrite gets in his way, auxiliary chutes would 
have to be built so as to shunt the pyrite into the waiting car. If the 
mine produced less than a car of pyrite per day, at present this would 
tie up a railroad car for a time too long when equipment is short. Since 
the quantity of recoverable pyrite varies somewhat in different por- 
'tions of the mine and the daily tonnage of coal from the mine fluctuates, 
the mine might not always fill its car; or again, under favorable condi- 
tions, more than a carload would be produced. The excess would have 
to be either left in the mine or stored in bins at the surface. This gen- 
eral plan is probably not practical, for it places too much responsibility 
on the pit bosses or room bosses, men whose time now is completely 
occupied. 

An alternative method suggested would be to load only enough out 
on certain days designated; for example, as "sulphur day," to fill a car, 
the excess being carried in the mine, possibly different portions of the 
mine alternating so as to avoid gathering from all parts of the mine. 
The exclusive business of hauling sulphur might be given to the last trip 
of the day or first trip in the morning to avoid congestion in entries and 
on roadways, and not tie up pit cars any longer than necessary.^ 

Where a mine or two mines close together could produce enough 
pyrite to operate a washery, locating the plant at one mine and hauling 

^ Crude pyrite weighs from one-half more to twice as much as an equal bulk of coal, 
and account must be taken of this not to overload equipment. 



238 Year Book 

by truck from the other, using auxiliary chutes and bins, loading out 
sulphur any time would seem to be practical. 

At many times a simple rearrangement of tracks on the surface 
would make it possible to handle "sulphur" much as gob from roadways 
is handled instead of going to the dump, sending to a loading chute 
over the railroad car when shipped by rail, or to a cheaply constructed 
bin if hauled by wagons or trucks. 

It would seem impractical to attempt the recovery of pyrite from 
mines that could produce but a few hundred pounds each day, although 
idle days here might be utilized a few times a year if found necessary. 
Experience has shown that the recovery of a by-product can best be 
undertaken where it settles easiest to a routine, once started. This 
being true, the mines with the high percentage of recoverable pyrite 
should offer the most inducement for the experiment. 

LOCATION FOR PYRITE WASHERIES 

Detailed plans for the location of central washeries would best be 
left to the discretion of the builders, taking into account the tonnages, 
quality or kind of crude pyrite, distribution of mines with reference to 
railroads and truck routes, and outlet for the finished product, with other 
factors. A mill handling pyrite entirely from Seam No. V might find it 
advantageous to use special machinery other than necessary for the 
concentration of raw pyrite from Seams III and VI. These, as well as 
many other minor problems, suggest themselves to an engineer locating 
and designing a plant. 

In general, adequate water supply should be insured, although by 
the use rf settling dams or tanks water may be used over and over. 

Terre Haute, from which several railroads radiate to mines with 
adequate supplies of pyrite, would seem a logical center for washeries. 
A railroad haul of less than twenty-five miles would collect nearly 70 
per cent of the recoverable pyrite of the State and serve the largest num- 
ber of mines if it were advantageous to centralize mills. If it were best 
to distribute smaller units near large producers, some locations on the 
C. & E. I. R. R. and C. T. H. & S. E. R. R. between Clinton and Terre 
Haute would bring the mills close to producers. Also smaller units near 
Shelbourne, Dugger and Jasonville are suggested. 

The fields adjacent to Bicknell could probably supply a fair-sized 
unit, while a small mill could be kept busy at Evansville or Boonville 
to take care of mines south of Princeton. It might be found more ad- 
vantageous to locate a plant at Oakland City, as that is a junction point. 

It will be understood the above are merely suggestions and not recom- 
mendations. Many problems suggested above are to be taken into con- 
sideration and too many factors at present are unknown to more than 
suggest locations. The suggestions are based upon quantity and quality 
of crude pyrite and not upon market and transportation facilities, which 
should be gone into in much more detail than time and conditions al- 
lowed. 



Geology and Natural Resources 



2S9 



EXPERIMENTS ON THE CONCENTRATION OF PYRITE FROM 

INDIANA 

By E. A. Holbrook* 

There was some doubt as to whether or not the pyrite in the Indiana 
mines was really high grade pyrite. For this reason three lots of the 
crude pyrite, one each from Seams No. IV, V and VI were shipped to 
the Bureau at Urbana, Illinois. The tests showed that simple crushing 
and water concentration could produce a pyrite with sulphur content 
between 42 and 46 per cent, or practically equal to the imported Spanish 
pyrite of 47 per cent pyrite. The details of the tests follow. 

(a) CRUDE PYRITE WITH COAL ATTACHED FROM SEAM NO. VI, INDIANA 

Introduction: As received, the material was flat bands and lenses 
of pyrite with considerable adhering coal. The pyrite was up to BV2 
inches in thickness, and the individual lumps, with coal attached, up to 
8 or 9 inches in thickness. To the eye there appeared by weight to be 
about V2 coal and V2 pyrite in the material. The pyrite was dull and 
stony and in color varied from a bronze to dark gray. 

Conclusions: Crude Coal Pyrite from Seam VI, Indiana, offers no 
difficulty in concentration, and produces high grade pyrite concentrate, 
even in sizes above one inch. Very few fines are made in crushing and 
they are easily taken care of in treatment either by saving as a hutch 
product of the jigs or by treating them on concentrating tables. On ac- 
count of the large size of the clean pieces of pyrite, it is probable that 
simple screening after crushing, or screening followed by hand picking, 
will produce about 1/5 of the total pyrite as a clean lump pyrite. 

A flow sheet of a proposed treatment plant follows: 

Crude Pyrite 



Jaw or Gyratory Rock Breaker 



Water 



large Trommel Disintegrating Screen (Dry; 



Undersize 



Oversize 



2 Compartment Jig 








Hand Picking 








Overflow 
Coal 




1st Screen 1st Hutch 
Clean Clean 


:2nd Screen 
: Middlings 


2nd Hutch: 
Middlings! 


Coal Clean Lump J-yrite 


Fine 
Pyrite Pyrite 









Rolls 



Concentrating Tabic 
Mids. Coal 



Clean 
Fine 
Pyrite 



Overflow 



♦From experiments conducted at the U. S. Bureau of Mines Experiment Station. 
Urbana, 111., and published by consent of the director. 



240 Year Book 

Notes: The pyrite tends to break into flat pieces in breaker, while 
the coal breaks into cubical pieces. Therefore, screening this broken 
material in a round hole trommel screen allows the coal to fall through 
the holes with the smaller pyrite, while the coarse pyrite remains on the 
screen as a nearly pure oversize. This can be cleaned by hand picking 
from the few remaining pieces of coal. 

The coarse screening is done dry. In this way the oversize lump 
pyrite is prepared for market without wetting. 

Details of Test: From the size of the individual lumps of pyrite 
it seemed that comparatively coarse crushing should free the pyrite from 
the coal. Accordingly the lumps were crushed in a gyratory rock 
breaker set at 1^/^ inches. It should be noted here that the pyrite is so 
hard that rock crushing rather than coal crushing machinery is neces- 
sary for its reduction. Some of the pyrite in the broken mass was of 
larger size than the coal and was flatter in shape, consequently it 
seemed that screening the material over a 1-inch ro'und hole screen would 
produce a coarse oversize that should be pure pyrite. The treatment 
for the material under 1-inch round hole size was j-igging without sizing 
to obtain pure pyrite and a middling product and recrushing the mid- 
dling and treating this either on the jig or on a concentrating table. 

The complete flow sheet of the test run is given on p. — together 
with percentages and analyses of products. The crushed material from 
the rock breaker was screened in a trommel or roller screen equipped 
with interior ribs for the purpose of breaking adhering coal from the 
pieces of pyrite. The sizes and analyses given show the definite in- 
creased pyrite percentages as the size of the product increased. The 
product marked over 1-inch round hole, consisted of 14.7 per cent of the 
original material and analyzed 41.10 per cent sulphur. In other words, 
v/ithout further treatment than crushing and screening about 1/5 of the 
pyrite in the coal was above the minimum commercial sulphur analysis 
for pyrite. To the eye this material looked contaminated by many pieces 
of coal, which seemed to be hard and even often flat. The product was 
hand jigged and this coal easily floated away, leaving 90 per cent of 
the original weight as a clean lump pyrite of 44.9 per cent sulphur. In 
practice it might be cheaper to hand pick the coal from this coarse 
pyrite. 

The sizes under 1-inch round hole screen were united and jigged. 
The first bed (coarse) saved the largest production of the pyrite, and 
the percentage of sulphur is high (44.2). The first hutch product of 
fine conecentrates is remarkable because of its purity, 45.5 per cent 
sulphur. The flow sheet details the treatment of the second bed mid- 
dlings which were made into high grade concentrates and poor coal 
by crushing through ^/d-inch screen and treating on a concentrating 
table. The fine second hutch low grade concentrates were treated di- 
rectly on a concentrating table and the improvement is marked. The 
coal screened from the jig run was clean as regards ash content, but 
high in sulphur. Another compartment on the jig would produce a 
cleaner coal. 

The resume of the test is given on p. 241. 



Geology and Natural Resources 



241 



(b) PYRITE FROM SEAM NO. V, INDIANA 

Introduction: Much of the pyrite in Seam No. V in Indiana occurs 
as round or oval boulders, often of as much as 200 pounds weight. This 
form of occurrence is illustrated in Fig. 2, p. . These boulders gen- 
erally are at or near the bottom of the seam and must be mined with 
the coal. In some of the mines worked in this seam large tonnages of 
these boulders have been thrown back into the gob during regular mining 
operations. * * * There was doubt as to whether or not these 
bottom boulders of pyrite were pure enough to be considered commercial 
pyrite, and as any commercial pyrite cleaning plant erected in Indiana 
would receive considerable of this material, concentrating tests were 
carried out with it. 

The flow sheet used was the same as for (a) the pyrite from seam 
No. VI Indiana andd described on p. 239. 

Conslusions : The pyrite balls or boulders are a pure form of pyrite 
and require only crushing, screening and jigging to produce clean pyrite 
of commercial grade. The percentage of coarse lump pyrite in the ma- 
terial is high. 

Carbon Content: It has been stated that a high carbon content in 
coal pyrite lowers the value in the roasting furnaces. Our statement 
was made to the writer that clean coal pyrite contained from 8 to 10 per 
cent of carbon. To determine the real carbon content of the pyrite con- 
centrates, samples from this test were forwarded the Bureau of Mines 
Laboratory at Pittsburg, Pa., and there analyzed for sulphur and carbon. 
The results follow: 

PYRITE CONCENTRATES FROM RUN (b) SEAM NO. V, INDIANA 



Laboratory 


i'orm 


Total Sulphur % 


Total Carbon % 


Oreanic 
Carbon 'V, 


30542 
30543 


First EedJig 

Lump Concftntrates 


44.77 
45.88 
45.03 
43.88 


2.90 
2.60 
3.75 
6.76 


2.27 
L83 


30544 


First Hutch 


2.96 


30545 


Recleaned Middlings 


6.61 



Since the lump, first bed and first hutch concentrates are in the largest 
percentage, the average total carbon content of all the pyrite of this run is 
2.63 per cent. This may be taken as an average concentrate. 



16—18966 



242 



Year Book 



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Geology and Natural Resources 243 

Pyritf: fr )m Seam No. VI, Indiana — Resume 



Materia 


Concen- 
trate 
Weight 


%of 
total 
concen- 
trates 


Sulphur 
analysis 
or con- 
centrate 


Coal 
Weight 


%of 
total 
Coal 


Coal 
analysis 

%A8h 


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Wt. 


%of 
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Loss 


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9r s. 

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134 


20.4 


44.9 


15 


3.8 


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89 


56.6 
13.5 


44.2 
45.5 


322 


83.7 


14.4 1 65 


92.2 






Size 












1 








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dlings 


52 


8 


42.0 


20 


5.2 


19.8 


5.5 








2nd Hutch Tabled Mid- 
dlings 


10 


1.5 


44.5 


. ^'8 


7.3 


19.0 


7.8 


6.5 


33.4 


Total 


657 


100 


4'r.3C, 


d85 


100.0 


15.3 


70.5 


100.0 


6.5 


33 4 



O 1,119 pounds of material treated, 657 pounds or 58.8 per cent was 
recovered as a pyrite of 44.35 per cent sulphur content; 385 pounds, or 34.4 per 
cent, was recovered as coal of 15.4 per cent ash. The loss in treatment was 
70.5 pounds or 6.3 per cent and the middling:s still on band were 6.5 pounds or 
.5 per cent. 

Resume of Laboratory Test on Pyrite from Seam No. V, Indiana 



Materia. 


Concentrate 
weight lbs. 


%of 
total 
concen- 
trates 


Sulphur 
analysis 
of con • 
centra te 


Coal 
Weight 


%of 
Total 
Coal 


Coal 
analysis 

%Ash 


Loss 
Wt. 


%of 
Mids. 
Total 
Wt. 
Loss 


%s. 

in 

Mids. 


Orer 1" 


174.5 


20.4 


43.6 






























472 1st Screen 
102 1st Hutch 
114 2nd Bed 


53 6 

11 6 

. 13.0 


42.4 
43.5 
41.3 














l"-0 Size 


112 


77.2 


21.9 


9 5 


9.5 






















2nd Hutch Tabled. . . 


16.5 


1.8 


42.3 


33 


22.8 


21.0 


0.5 


5 




Mids 








































Total 


879.0 


100.0 


42.62 


145 


100.0 




10 


100 





.Of 1,034 poimds of material treated., 899 pounds or 85 per cent was recovered 
as pyrite of 42.62 per cent sulphur content; 145 pounds or 14 per cent was 
recovered as coal of 21.7 per cent ash. The separation was so complete that no 
middlings were made. 

Tests were run on pyrite from seam No. Ill with equally good results. 
Pyrite from the coals of Indiana can be mechanically washed in quantity, 
giving a product that compares well with the imported Spanish product. 



THE pyrite market 

Pyrite contains two elements absolutely essential to warfare: sulphur 
and iron. In a ton of chemically pure pyrite the proportions would be 
approximately 932 pounds of iron and 1,068 pounds of sulphur. The 
Spanish pyrite usually contains a small percentage of copper, which is 
recovered. Coal pyrite of Indiana when thoroughly cleaned by wash- 



244 Year Book 

ing usually contains from 40 per cent to 45 per cent of sulphur and a 
proportionate amount of iron, a little carbon (2.9 per cent to 6.76 per 
cent, see page 241), rarely a minute quantity of zinc and from 10 per 
cent to 17 per cent of other impurities. It compares favorably in these 
respects to the Spanish product. Coal pyrite does not contain arsenic or 
antimony, impurities that often make otherwise high grade pyrite un- 
salable. Since the present war, the market for domestic pyrite has been 
stimulated due to the curtailment of imports and the increased quantity 
consumed. 

Different sizes of pyrite usually have different selling prices, due to 
the construction of burners and uses made of the iron cinder or residue, 
so that prices given are subject to modifications. The present (Septem- 
ber 15, 1918), price on domestic pyrite ranges from 28 to 32 cents per 
unit.* On a 40 per cent sulphur basis this is $11.20 to $12.80 per ton, a 
very attractive price compared to the price received for coal at the mine. 
The belief is general that the price will not be less than 15 cents per unit 
f. o. b. point of production for some time, possibly two years or more. 
This of course is a belief based on present conditions which may change 
before this reaches the reader. 

USES AND IMPORTANCE OF SULPHURIC ACID 

The tremendous industrial expansion incident to the present war 
has created a demand for sulphuric acid that has never been entirely 
satisfied. Acid plants all over the United States have been producing 
to capacity. Even old plants that stood idle before the war were put 
into a semblance of condition and set to producing. The demand was 
stimulated by the needs of acids for the manufacture of explosives as 
well as the manufacture of dozens of other war necessities. 

In order to convey a conception of the importance of sulphuric acid, 
the following summary is included: 

Min. Res. of the U. S., 1917, Pt. II, p. 58. Quoted from Lunge Groye, 
Manufacture of Sulphuric Acid and Alkali, Vol. I, Pt. 2, pp. 
1169-1170. 
"1. In a more or less dilute state (say from 1^4 Twad. doivnward) . 
For making sulphate of soda (salt cake) and hydrochloric acid, and 
therefore ultimately for soda ash, bleaching powder, soap, glass, and in- 
numerable other products. Further, for superphosphates and other arti- 
ficial manures. These two applications probably consume nine-tenths 
of all the sulphuric acid produced. Further applications are for pre- 
paring sulphurous, nitric, phosphoric, hydrofluoric, boric, carbonic, 
chromic, oxalic, tartaric, citric, acetic, and stearic acids; in preparing 
phosphorus, iodine, bromine, and sulphates of potassium, ammonium, 
barium (blanc fize) , calcium (pearl-hardening) ; especially also for pre- 
cipitating baryta or lime as sulphates for chemical processes; sulphates 

^ Pyrites are usually paid for on the basis of their sulphur content, at so much per 
unit. A unit is one per cent of sulphur as shown by analysis. Thus if the price is 10 
cents per unit and the ore shows 43 per cent of sulphur, the price per ton would be ten 
times 43, or $4.30. The price is neither fixed nor stabilized and is subject to considerable 
market fluctnation. 



Geology and Natural Resources 245 

of magnesium, aluminum, iron, zinc, copper, mercury (as intermediate 
stage for calomel and corrosive sublimate) ; in the metallurgy of copper, 
cobalt, nickel, platinum, silver; for cleaning (pickling) sheet iron to be 
tinned or galvanized; for cleaning copper, silver, etc.; for manufactur- 
ing potassium bichromate; for working galvanic cells, such as are used 
in telegraphy, in electro-plating, etc.; for manufacturing ordinary ether 
and the composite ethers; for making or purifying many organic color- 
ing matters, especially in the oxidizing mixture of potiassium. bichromate 
and sulphuric acid; for parchment paper; for purifying many mineral 
oils, and sometimes coal gas; for manufacturing starch, sirup, and 
sugar; for the saccharification of corn; for neutralizing the alkaline re- 
action of fermenting liquors, such n^is molasses ; for effervescent drinks ; 
for preparing tallow previously to melting it; for recovering the fatty 
acids from soapsuds; for destroying vegetable fibers in mixed fabrics; 
generally in dyeing, calico printing, tanning; as a chemical reagent in 
innumerable cases; in medicine against lead poisoning, and in many 
other cases. 

2. In a concentrated state. For manufacturing the fatty acids by 
distillation; purifying colza oil; for purifying benzene, petroleum, par- 
affin oil, and other mineral oils; for drying air, especially for laboratory 
purposes, but also for drying gases for manufacturing processes (for 
this, weaker acid also, of 140° Twad., can be used) ; for the production 
of ice by the rapid evaporataion of water in a vacuum; for refining 
gold and silver, desilvering copper, etc.; for making organo-sulphonic 
acids; manufacturing indigo; preparing many nitric compounds and 
nitro ethers, especially in manufacturing nitroglycerin, pyroxylin, nitro- 
benzene, picric acid, etc. 

3. As Nordhausen fuming oil of vitriol (anhydride).. For manu- 
fatcuring certain organo-sulphonic acids (in the manufacture of alizarin, 
eosin, indigo, etc.) ; for purifying ozokerite; for making shoe blacking; 
for bringing ordinary concentrated acid up to the highest strength as 
required in the manufacture of pyroxylin; and for other purposes." 

According to Utley Wedge, of Ardmore, Pa., the amount of 50° 
Baume sulphuric acid consumed in the United States for various pur- 
poses during normal years is as follows: 

1. Fertilizers 2,400,000 tons 

2. Petroleum 800,000 tons 

3. Iron, steel and coke industries 200,000 tons 

4. Explosives (pre-war conditions) 150,000 tons 

5. All other industries 200,000 tons 



3,250,000 tons 

Due to the curtailment of the potash supply, complete fertilizers have 
not been produced in pre-war quantities, hence item (1) will probably 
not show increase. Consumption in each of the other industries has 
increased as is shown by the fact that probably not far from 10,000,000 
tons of sulphuric acid of all grades will be necessary to supply the de- 
mand during the present year. This means an expansion of nearly 
three times the normal pre-war acid consumption. 



246 



Year Book 



Sulphuric acid is manufactured by: 

1. Burning brimstone or native sulphur. 

2. Burning pyrites, either in lump burners or mechanical 

furnaces. 

3. Roasting sulphide mixtures. 

4. Dead roasting zinc blende in kilns ; and, 

5. Utilizing waste sulphur gases from smelters of low grade 

copper and other ores. 

Adapted from "The Sulphuric Acid Situation in the United States," 
Lewis B. Skinner. Jan. 1918. Metallurgical and Chemical En- 
gineering, Vol. XVIII, pp. 82-83. 
The distribution of ore used in the manufacture of sulphuric acid iii 

1917, in long tons was as follows: 





Sulphur 


Pyrites 


Gold and Silver 

bearing pyrites 

and galena 


Copper bearing 
Sulphides 


Zinc bearing 
Sulphides 


Douut'Blic 


463,364 
20,463 


376,955 
880,183 


17,380 


708,502 
147,531 


584,100 
152,811 









Totals 


483,827 


1,257,138 


17,380 


856,033 


736,911 







Mineral Resources of the U. S. 1917, Part II, page 61. 



LOCATION OF PYRITE WASHERIES 

The most practical method suggested for taking care of the limited 
output of pyrite from mines is a central washing or concentrating plant 
of such size as to serve two or more mines. A washery with a capacity 
of 50 tons per 8-hour day seems to be the smallest practical unit. The 
capacity of such a plant could easily be tripled by operating in three 
shifts. Continuous operation of any metallurgical plant is most success- 
ful as well as economical. Depreciation is proceeding while machinery 
is idle, and especially iron and steel in contact with acid waters from 
pyrite. 

In general a 100-ton mill per eight hours could be operated with the 
addition of only one or two men over a 50-ton unit, thus doubling the 
capacity with less than double in labor cost. The larger plants would 
in general be most economical. 

Detailed plans for location of central v/asheries would best be left 
to the discretion of the builders, taking into account the tonnages, quality 
or kind of crude pyrite, distribution of mines with reference to rail- 
roads and truck routes, and outlet for the finished product, with other 
factors. A mill handling pyrite entirely from Seam No. V might find 
it advantageous to use special machinery other than necessary for the 
concentration of raw pyrite from Seams III and VI. These, as well as 
many other minor problems, suggest themselves to an engineer locating 
and designing a plant. 

In general, adequate water supply should be assured, although by 
use of settling dams or tanks watei' may be used over and over. 



r 



Geology and Natural Resources 247 

Terre Haute, from which several railroads radiate to mines with 
large supplies of pyrite, would seem a logical center for washeries. A 
railroad haul of less than twenty-five miles would collect fully 70 per 
cent of the recoverable pyrite of the coal fields and serve the largest 
number of mines if it were advantageous to centralize mills. If it were 
best to distribute smaller units near large producers, some locations on 
the C. & E. I. R. R. and C. T. H. & S. E. R. R. between Clinton and Terre 
Haute would bring the mills close to producers. Also smaller units near 
Shelburn, Dugger and Jasonville are suggested. 

The fields adjacent to Bicknell could probably supply a fair-sized 
unit, while a small mill could be kept busy at Evansville or Boonville 
to take care of mines south of Princeton. It might be found more ad- 
vantageous to locate a plant at Oakland City as that is a junction point. 

It will be understood the above are merely suggestions and not 
recommendations. Many problems suggested above are to be taken into 
consideration and too many factors at present are unknown to more 
than suggest locations. The suggestions are based upon quantity and 
quality of crude pyrite and not upon market and transportation facil- 
ities, which should be gone into in much more detail than time or con- 
ditions allowed. 

^ ORIGIN OF PYRITE 

The origin of pyrite in the coal is not well understood. White^ at- 
tributes the "high percentage of sulphur in the sea-overswept coal of 
the interior basins, to the submergence of the coal form peat deposits by 
the sea, the immediate occupation of the area by animal life, and the 
action of sulphur bacteria." 

He further regards somewhat richly sulphide rocks in the drainage 
basins in which the coal forms as a source of the sulphur. 

The evidence from the occurrence of the various forms of pyrite in 
Indiana coals seem to indicate that most lenses and bands formed, at 
least in part after the peat was buried, perhaps from sulphates reduced 
by the carbonaceous matter of the seam and before complete consolida- 
tion. Some thin bands of pyrite seem to have been fractured at the 
time of jointing of the coal, and later filled with pyrite of different tex- 
ture, usually «hiny and contrasting sharply with the dull stony portion 
of the" band. Not uncommonly both lenses and bands show enlargement 

by similar shiny pyrite. Attention has been called on page to the 

"nigger heads" from Seam No. V that show all gradations, from nearly 
pure calcium carbonate with a little iron in the form of limonite or 
siderite to essentially pure pyrite, many showing a shrinkage with vugs 
and cracks partially filled with crystalline pyrite. There seem to be 
plainly pyrite replacements after calcium carbonate, the shape and size 
of which were probably determined by the original carbonate boulder. 
In the coal they are often fossiliferous but with plant remains. The 
coarse nature of the remains suggests that they were probably more 
porous than the surrounding material and hence a locus for precipitation. 

Lenses and bands of pyrite often show that their position was some- 
what controlled by aggregates of coarse fragments of stems, trunks or 

* White, David, The Origin of Coal, Bull. 38, U. S. Bureau of Mines, 1913, p. 34. 



248 Year Book 

branches, mother of coal, shale bands, or "black jack" that diverted or 
directed the sulphide bearing waters if not exercising a precipitating 
effect. 

The reducing power of charcoal is well known. The common asso- 
ciation of pyrite with mineral charcoal offers a possible explanation 
for many nuclei, about which it is conceivable lenses and nodules might 
grow. 

The larger amount of massive pyrite bands and lenses in the north- 
eastern portion of the field would seem to indicate that as the direction 
from which the ferruginous waters came. It seems rather more than 
a coincidence that all the coals examined showed larger percentages of 
recoverable pyrite in the northeastern area. 

The larger percentage of disseminated pyrite further south would 
seem to indicate solutions of lower concentration in iron and sulphur, 
or else meager amounts of similar density. 

From the above three stages might be postulated: 

1. The neutral or alkaline stage in which the open peat bed had 
more or less free communication with the sea with consequent precipita- 
tion of calcium carbonate, during which nodules or balls (in Seam No. 
V) and moulds of trunk and stem fragments were formed, especially 
abundant in Seam No. Ill, and a second stage after burial and partial 
consolidation of the coal when ferruginous acid waters replaced many 
carbonate bodies and formed the bulk of bands, nodules and lenses of 
pyrite directly. The third after partial unloading and erosion extend- 
ing to the present, in which some pyrite may have been redissolved and 
precipitated as filling in fissures in the coal and pyrite. 

As pointed out, the above is offered to explain the data available at 
the present time. New and important facts may later be discovered that 
would materially alter the conclusions and as such would be a welcome 
addition to our scant knowledge of the origin of these bodies that are 
so common and yet have been so long disregarded. 





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Geology and Natural Resources 255 

Notes on Tabular Summary 

1. Abbreviations : l=lenses ; b=band3 ; j. v.=joint veins or "cat faces" ; lv8.= 
leaves. 

2. The size of pyrite masses refers to fragments of pyrite as found in the gob 
and does not refer to weight of lump with adhering coal. The lenses tend to break out 
whole, unless very large, while thinner bands break up into pieces weighinjc 2 to 10 
pounds. Balls come out whole and the maximum size (3) usually refers to these lenses 
or balls, 3 to 6 inches thick, that are not broken up by shooting. 

4. The percent of recoverable pyrite was arrived at by methods stated on page — , 
(5) the possible daily production of pyrite by multiplying the figures in (4) by the 
average daily tonnage. 

6. Crude pyrite is the pyrite with adhering coal as usually gobbed in the mine 
or discarded at the tipple. If the per cent is 50, it means that essentially an equal 
weight of coal is discarded with the pyrite, a large percentage of which might be re- 
covered in a pyrite washery. \ 

7. As stated on page — lack of time made it impossible to make a detailed exam- 
ination of each mine. Where this was not done the figures given are from data col- 
lected in nearby properties, taking the minimum each time rather than the maximum. 
These are marked Estimated. 

SUMMARY 

Pyrite is used for making sulphuric acid of which nearly 10,000,000 
tons of all grades will be consumed during 1918. 

The mining industry of the nation has been called upon to supply 
a large tonnage of pyrite formerly imported. 

Pyrite occurs in recoverable quantity in association with bituminous 
coals of Indiana. It is being mined and thrown aside as waste in a 
region close to where it is consumed. 

It can be recovered by simple washeries, cheaply constructed and 
operated by unskilled labor. 

A tonnage of coal now left in the mines nearly equal to that of 
pyrite may be saved to the coal industry at a reasonable cost. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Salaries and expenses $2,205 75 

Office supplies 957 43 

Transportation and supplies 558 15 

Express 12 94 

Telephone and telegraphs 64 03 

Total $3,798 30 



REPORT OF SUPERVISOR OF OIL INSPECTION 



ADAM H. FELKER, Supervisor. 

Report of the supervisor of oil inspection as submitted to Edward 
Barrett, State Geologist, on November 23, 1918, by Adam H. Felker, 
Supervisor, covering the months of July, August, September and Octo- 
ber, 1918: 



Kerosene. 


Gasoline. 


Fees. 




Kerosene. 


Gasoline. 


Fees. 


No. Bbls. 


No. Bbls. 






No. Bbls. 


No. Bbls. 




Akron 


593 


983 


$97 33 


Frankfort 


. 2,768 


6,536 


$555 97 


Alexandria .... 


1,104 


1,299 


149 44 


Ft. Wayne... 


.. 7,115 


21,424 


1,692 56 


Anderson 


4,360 


8,794 


789 37 


Farmersburg . 


372 


498 


48 85 


Argos 


130 


512 


42 01 


Gas City 


. 1,337 


864 


129 73 


Attica 


1,150 


3,093 


250 14 


Goodland 


260 


1,099 


81 72 


Auburn 


1,777 


4,779 


361 67 


Garrett 


907 


1,090 


119 05 


Albion 


661 


1,001 


99 91 


Galveston 


372 


1,018 


82 65 


Bedford 


422 


834 


78 53 


Gary 


. 3.082 


10,026 


747 54 


Bicknell 


1,138 


. 1,254 


161 21 


Geneva 


803 


1,200 


128 49 


Bloomfield 


161 


130 


17 83 


Glenwood 


612 


1,177 


103 22 


Bloomington . . 


735 


955 


95 85 


Goshen 


. 1,036 


1,921 


179 72 


Bluffton 


1,132 


3,299 


283 38 


Greenfield 


486 


1,166 


99 61 


Bourbon 


424 


803 


77 76 


Greensburg . . 


261 


3,256 


210 19 


Bremen 


130 


642 


50 46 


Greenwood . . . 


. 


253 


16 69 


Berne 


725 


1,463 


138 44 


Hammond . . . 


867 


4,398 


289 87 


Brook 




390 


25 35 


Hagerstown . 


620 


1,120 


102 25 


Brimfield 


1 


... 


49 


Hartford City, 


.. 1,961 


1,986 


241 26 


Brookville 


1,242 


2,232 


204 22 


Hazelton . . . . 


291 


450, 


44 98 


Brownsburg . . . 


80 


207 


17 71 


Hobart 


. 1,079 


2,855 


231 77 


Brookston 


632 


1,443 


125 95 


Haubstadt . . . 


674 


604 


79 29 


Cambridge City 


611 


1,388 


123 67 


Hebron 


161 


161 


18 76 


Colfax 


536 


1,966 


147 86 


Hope 


.. 485 


812 


79 86 


Churubusco . . . 


1,132 


1,933 


201 15 


Huntington . 


.. 2,645 


5,822 


519 53 


Cleveland, . . . 


13 


2 


4 20 


Hamlet 


292 


161 


27 24 


Claypool 


332 


613 


55 65 


Indianapolis . 


.. 18,608 


68,401 


5.102 75 


Columbia City. 


1,406 


3,554 


308 05 


Jeffersonville. , 


. 1,039 


2,981 


232 48 


Cloverdale 


701 


706 


83 12 


Jasonville . . . 


404 


467 


48 58 


Connersville .. . 


2,357 


4,005 


381 83 


Kingman . . . . 


573 


1,207 


103 45 


Converse 


914 


1,508 


153 53 


Kendallville ., 


712 


2,926 


222 49 


Covington 


634 


1,133 


112 16 


Kewanna . . . . 


584 


892 


94 33 


Crawfordsville . 


651 


2,551 


196 16 


Knightstown . 


834 


2,100 


183 57 


Crown Point... 


420 


861 


79 39 


Knox 


. 1,044 


1,306 


147 87 


Culver 


297 


574 


53 43 


Kokomo 


. 4,505 


10,645 


922 50 


Carlisle 


131 


543 


42 97 


Lacrosse . . . . 




291 


17 83 


Decatur 


804 


2,264 


196 69 


Lafayette ... 


.. 3,002 


12,241 


916 74 


Delphi 


1,314 


4,879 


363 18 


Laurel 


291 


650 


60 08 


Dunkirk 


1,275 


1,807 


192 56 


LaGrange . . . . 


. 1,002 


3,689 


281 27 


Dugger 


162 


291 


27 24 


Lawrenceburg , 


496 


2,318 


170 87 


East Chicago. . 


22 


2,183 


96 79 


LaPorte 


337 


641 


61 19 


Elkhart 


3,529 


10,664 


883 81 


Lebanon 


,. 1,236 


4,417 


338 87 


ElvFood 


601 


1.315 


116 63 


Liberty 


729 


2,302 


171 77 


Evansville .... 


7,899 


12,623 


1,216 23 


Ligonier 


986 


1,865 


176 53 


Farmland 


283 


714 


61 76 


Linton 


. 1,973 


4,812 


412 73 


Fairmount .... 


2,129 


4,755 


407 16 


Logansport . . 


. 2,633 


7,422 


586 02 


Flora 


513 


1,274 


112 73 


Loogootee . . . 


799 


1,395 


100 47 


Fowler 


877 


4,957 


361 57 


Lowell 


411 


453 


48 67 


Fortville 


416 


1,123 


87 12 


Lafountaine . 


842 


1.165 


123 91 



(256) 



Geology and Natural Resources 



257 





Kerosene. 


Gasoline. 


Fees. 


1 


kerosene. 


Gasoline 


Fees. 




No. Bbls. 


No. Bbls. 








No. Bbls. 


No. Bbls 




Losantville . . . 


674 


997 


$104 


73 


Roachdale 


293 


909 


$72 46 


Louisville, Ky 


. 1.006 


1,816 


270 


84 


Rochester . . . 


1,226 


3,636 


291 46 


Lynn • 


741 
305 


1.579 


137 
31 


85 
62 


Roselawn 

Royal Center. 


252 
291 


853 
492 


69 55 


Mansfield. 0.. 


46 24 


Marion 


. 3.148 


9.364 


739 


30 


Rushville 


533 


2,867 


195 99 


Morocco 


203 


494 


39 


11 


Roann 


367 


1,121 


85 59 


Markle 


630 


5»2 


72 


76 


Ridgeville . . . 


452 


985 


88 61 


Monterey . . . . 


391 


597 


61 


49 


ShelbyviUe ... 


. 2,421 


6,234 


509 92 


Medarysville . 


389 


1,034 


92 


74 


South Bend. . . 


. 3,496 


15,697 


1,176 44 


Michigan City 


944 


2,230 


181 


27 


Spencer 




291 


17 83 


Mishawaka . . 


714 


1,423 


136 


91 


Sullivan 


570 


1,393 


131 73 


Mitchell 


. 1.218 


1,406 


119 


28 


Syracuse .... 


744 


1,920 


166 37 


Mooresville . . 


284 


757 


63 


08, 


South Whitley 


777 


851 


98 89 


Monroeville . . 


810 


1,612 


150 


01 


St. Paul 


165 


1.170 


80 96 


Middlebury .. 


667 


1.502 


128 


35 


Terre Haute. . 


. 7,233 


18.476 


1,530 10 


Monticello . . . 


798 


2.591 


206 


32 


Tipton 




873 


48 94 


Monon 


612 


901 


90 


91 


Union City... 


947 


2.290 


197 21 


Montpelier . . . 


552 


780 


85 


46 


Union Mills.. 


. 


130 


8 45 


Muncie 


. 4,148 


11.330 


918 41 


Valparaiso . . 


. 1,248 


4.524 


346 06 


Middletown .. 


536 


681 


72 


91 


Veedersburg . 


627 


949 


97 33 


Morristown . . 


162 


1.234 


82 


83 


Van Buren . . 


574 


945 


91 07 


Nappannee . . 


. 1,078 


1,584 


161 


76 


Vincennes . . . 


3.273 


8.467 


769 32 


New Albany. . 


. 2,449 


6,103 


488 


59 


Wabash 


1.797 


4,395 


376 86 


New Carlisle.. 


421 


320 


44 


98 


Walkerton ... 


130 


260 


25 35 


Newcastle . . . 


. 3.446 


8,843 


733 


75 


Warsaw 


1,017 


3,818 


308 88 


New Paris... 


283 


1,692 


118 


40 


Warren 


485 


1.151 


99 13 


North Judson 


730 


761 


85 


68 


Washington . 


1,638 


3,605 


307 44 


N. Manchester 


. 1.120 


3,57S 


282 


14 


Waveland . . . 




130 


8 45 


Oakland City. 


819 


1.436 


135 


90 


Westport 


364 


1.166 


86 75 


Odon 




421 


26 


28 


Whiting 


396 


1,255 


174 81 


Otterbein 


336 


894 


77 


85 


Westfield .... 


162 


260 


26 31 


Oxford 


496 


1.496 


114 


36 


West Lebanon 


1,263 


3.406 


277 22 


Ossian 


207 


803 


62 


15 


Whitestown . 


421 


1,324 


111 50 


Pendleton . . . 


291 


1,541 


109 


56 


Winamac .... 


390 


1.199 


102 27 


Peru 


. 2,521 


6,050 


531 


96 


Winchester . . 


984 


1.454 


145 94 


Pierceton 


520 


1,289 


117 


97 


Wolcottville . . 


526 


493 


57 99 


Plymouth 


529 


551 


64 


25 


Woodburn . . . 


457 


932 


82 62 


Porter 


679 


1,047 


106 


38 


Worthington . 


543 


741 


79 50 


Portland 


. 1.803 


3,385 


319 


44 


Wheatfield ... 


489 


934 


88 19 


Princeton . . . 


. 1.136 
322 
681 
797 


3,518 
1,384 
1,296 
2,422 


285 
101 
123 
201 


12 
23 
01 
22 


Total .... 
Fees paid 








Red Key 

Remington . . 
Rensselaer . . . 


197,279 


515,020 


$42,914 80 
1,309 04 


Eichmond . . . 


. 2.565 


10,596 


802 


28 










Roanoke 


485 


627 


65 


21 


Fees due 






$41,605 76 



17—13956 



REPORT OF FISH AND GAME COMMISSIONER 



E. C. SHIREMAN, Commissioner. 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

The new Riverside Park Hatchery will soon be completed, and with 
this hatchery in operation the State of Indiana will be well equipped to 
restock the waters of the State with desirable game fish. However, 
there is little use to expend the funds of the Fish and Game Commission 
for propagating fish unless these fish are given adequate protection when 
planted in the lakes and streams. 

There is real need for a number of laws for the better protection of 
our fish, but there is such an imperative necessity for two such pro- 
tective laws that we feel that mention of them should be made in this 
report. 

First, we need a real law to prevent the pollution of the waters of 
the State. The pollution of our streams, especially, and to some degree 
our lakes, is being carried to such an extent that it is endangering the 
health of the people in the localities where the pollution is greatest. In 
so far as the pollution of our waters affects the health of the people, 
the State Board of Health should be empowered to prevent it, and a 
law should be enacted which will make it the duty of the State Board 
of Health to prevent the pollution of the water of the State to any ex- 
tent which would render it unfit for human consumption. 

Such a law, rigidly enforced, would make it unnecessary to pass an 
anti-pollution law for the protection of fish. If the waters of the 
State are kept sufficiently pure for human consumption, it naturally 
follows that they will be sufficiently pure to support the fish that would 
be planted in them. If we can't have a lawj to be enforced by the State 
Board of Health, to keep our waters pure enough for human consump- 
tion, and to protect human life, then let us have a law, enforcible by the 
Fish and Game Commissioner, to protect the animal life that naturally 
inhabits our waters. 

There are many of our streams that are so foul that no animal life 
can exist in them. Practical, sanitary methods of sewage disposal are 
now known, and there is no longer any excuse for dumping the sewage 
of our cities, or the waste from our manufacturing plants, into our 
streams, merely because it is the easiest and least expensive method of 
disposing of it. Our streams and lakes are becoming more and more the 
source of water supply for the people, and we have a right to demand 
that these waters be kept pure and wholesome. 

Second, we should have a closed season for all fishing during the 
nesting season of our game fish. The need of such a law is too obvious 
to admit of argument. Thousands of bass each year are taken from 
their nests by unscrupulous fishermen, and the replenishing of our lakes 
and streams by natural methods is prevented. The same arguments that 
would ^'ustify the taking of a bass from its nest, would also justify th^ 

(268) 



Fish and Game Commission 259 

killing of a setting hen off of her nest. The only way to effectively 
prevent the taking of game fish during the nesting season is to prevent 
all fishing during that period. 

Whether other needed legislation for the better protection of our 
fish and game is enacted or not, these two laws should be passed by our 
next Legislature. 



260 



Year Book 






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266 Year Book 

summary, plantings made from wawasee hatchery, season 1918 

Large-Mouth Black Bass, No. 1 Fingerlings 43,650 

Large-Mouth Black Bass, No. 2 Fingerlings 22,725 

Large-Mouth Black Bass, No. 3 Fingerlings 10,300 

76,675 

Small-Mouth Black Bass, No. 2 Fingerlings 350 

Small-Mouth Black Bass, No. 3 Fingerlings 1,368 

1,718 

Bluegills, No. 1 Fingerlings 12,000 

Total 90,393 

SUMMARY, PLANTINGS MADE FROM TRI-LAKES HATCHERY 

Large-Mouth Black Bass, No. 1 Fingerlings 39,360 

Large-Mouth Black Bass, No. 2 Fingerlings 14,908 

Large-Mouth Black Bass, No. 3 Fingerlings 1,750 

56,018 

Yellow Perch, No. 1 Fingerlings 600 

Yellow Perch, No. 2 Fingerlings 5,600 

Yellow Perch, No. 3 Fingerlings 1,200 

7,400 

Total 63,418 

SUMMARY, PLANTINGS MADE FROM BROOKVILLE HATCHERY 

Small-Mouth Black Bass, No. 1 Fingerlings 5,900 

Small-Mouth Black Bass, No. 2 Fingerlings 6,600 

12.500 

Large-Mouth Black Bass, No. 1 Fingerlings. 6,400 

Large-Mouth Black Bass, No. 2 Fingerlings 1,600 

8.000 

Total 20,500 

SUMMARY, PLANTINGS MADE FROM BASS LAKE HATCHERY , 

Large-Mouth Black Bass, No. 1 Fingerlings 11,500 

Large-Mouth Black Bass, No. 2 Fingerlings 8.000 

Large-Mouth Black Bass. No. 3 Fingerlings 28,000 

47,500 

SUMMARY, PLANTINGS MADE FROM RIVERSIDE HATCHERY 

Small-Mouth Black Bass, No. 1 Fingerlings 20,250 

Large-Mouth Black Bass, No. 1 Fingerlings 4,250 

24,500 

SUMMARY, PLANTINGS MADE FROM MARION, INDIANA, HATCHERY 

Small-Mouth Black Bass, No. 1 Fingerlings 4,400 

Large-Mouth Black Bass, No. 1 Fingerlings 5,100 

9,500 

SUMMARY, PLANTINGS MADE FROM ANDERSON HATCHERY 

Small-Mouth Black Bass, No. 2 Fingerlings 6.350 

Large-Mouth Black Bass. No. 1 Fingerlings 3.000 

Large-Mouth Black Bass. No. 2 Fingerlings 5,200 

14,550 



Fish and Game Commission 267 

summary, plantings made by marion county fish and game 
protective association 

Small-Mouth Black Bass, Advanced Fry 110,000 

Small-Mouth Black Bass, No, 1 Fingerlings 29,500 

Small-Mouth Black Bass, No. 2 Fingerlings 1,200 

140,700 

Large-Mouth Black Bass, Advanced Fry 40,000 

Large-Mouth Black Bass, No. 1 Fingerlings 15,550 

Large-Mouth Black Bass, No. 2 Fingerlings 1,200 

56,750 



Total 19.7,450 

\ 
FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Receipts. 

Balance in fund at beginning of year $25,347 72 

Resident fish and hunting license 79,862 90 

Non-resident fishing license 3,490 50 

Non-resident hunting license 1,065 00 

Fees from fines 1,569 92 

Fish sold by contract 581 31 

Fish sold by state 2,206 80 

Lake Michigan market fishermen's license 330 00 

Miscellaneous 43 53 

Total $114,497 68 

Disbursements. 

Salaries $31,375 00 

Deputies' expenses 21,030 18 

Fish hatcheries 25,245 38 

Postage 348 85 

Telegraph and telephone '. 312 56 

State fishing 7.001 85 

State organization 4,489 03 

Supplies 5,835 97 

Contract fishing 336 54 

Printing and stationery ; 31 25 

Freight and express 88 98 

Commissioner's traveling expenses 77 77 

Miscellaneous 26 00 

Total $96,199 36 

Balance on hand October 1, 1918 ; 18,298 32 



$114,497 68 



On October 1. 1918, Warrant i . 42.037, in the sum of $3,199.28. was drawn 
from Auditor's o. .ce to pay September disbursements, which makes a dif- 
ference of $3,199.28 in the balance of the Auditor and the Fish and Game 
books ; 18.298 32 

Amount drawn 3.199 28 

Balance on hand in Auditor's office, October 1 $21,497 60 



STATE FIRE MARSHAL DEPARTMENT 



H. H. FRIEDLEY, State Fire Marshal. 
NEWMAN T. MILLER, Attorney. 
GEORGE H. PEET, Jr., Secretary. 

The State Fire Marshal law, as enacted by the Legislature of 1913, 
set forth the duties of the Fire Marshal as follows: 

The enforcement of laws and ordinances of Indiana relating to: 

(1) The prevention of fires; 

(2) The storage, sale and use of combustibles and explosives; 

(3) The installation and maintenance of fire alarm systems and fire 
extinguishing equipments ; 

(4) The suppression of arson and investigation of the cause, origin 
and circumtances of fires; 

(5) The carrying on of educational work along fire prevention lines. 

Upon the recommendation of the former Fire Marshal, the law was 
amended by the Legislature of 1917 in some particulars, two of which 
are as follows: 

(1) Utilization of municipal fire departments in cities of the first, 
second, third and fourth classes for inspection and fire prevention work; 

(2) Additional authority for the dissemination, through the press, 
of fire prevention propaganda. 

To facilitate the fulfillment of the above duties, the Fire Marshal 
created the following divisions : 

(1) Inspection Division; 

(2) Educational and Statistical Division; and 

(3) Legal Division. 

Since March 27, 1917, when the present Fire Marshal took office, an- 
other division has been added, i. e., 

(4) Fire Prevention Engineering Division. 

The duties of these several divisions, and the work that has been 
done by each during the year ending September 30, 1918, as well as a 
suggested plan of action of each division, follows: 

INSPECTION DIVISION 

The inspection division of this department has issued 1,753 orders, 
based on reports of personal inspections, since January 1, 1918 (less 
than ten months). These orders have embraced the removal of dilapi- 
dated buildings and other structures, the repair of buildings and the 
improvement of garages, motion picture theaters, dry cleaning estab- 
lishments and school buildings in the way of eliminating or safeguard- 
ing exisitng fire hazards, as well as the storage, handling and sale of 
inflammable liquids and explosives. The following is a classified list of 
such orders: 

Removal orders 500 

Repair 131 

(26S) 



State Fire Marshal 269 

Schools '. 52 

Garages 470 

Garages discontinued 60 

Motion picture theaters 73 

Dry cleaning plants 47 

Gasoline 398 

Explosives 22 

This list does not show all corrections made but gives a fair estimate 
of the accomplishments of the fire marshal department through this 
division. The above list includes only such orders as have been issued 
directly from this office. The fire chiefs, town clerks and township trus- 
tees, all assistants to the fire niarshal by provision of the State Fire 
'Marshal law, are authorized to give orders for the correction of de- 
fects and the elimination of fire hazards which they may discover in the 
territory served by them. Many minor orders are written at the time 
of inspection as well as verbal instructions given by our inspectors, 
which are promptly carried out, and of which no statistical record is 
kept at this office. 

The State is divided into four sections, and each section is placed 
under the supervision of an inspector operating directly from this of- 
fice. In visiting the different cities and towns in their respective coun- 
ties, a careful survey is made of all buildings within the fire limits or 
business district. At such time all complaints received in this office are 
also given their personal attention. 

The co-operative spirit of the public is manifested by the cheerful 
acceptance of, and prompt compliance with these orders. There have 
been comparatively few appeals from such orders, the reasons given 
for the majority of appeals being conditions brought about by the war, 
namely, scarcity of labor and material and the great advance in prices. 
In the main, merely an extension of time or slight modificatign of the 
order is requested, with assurance in the former instance that the order 
will be complied with when conditions are again normal. 

The fire chiefs throughout the State have rendered valuable assist- 
ance in the work of this division. This co-operation on the part of the 
fire chiefs, together with the periodical inspections made by the" fire de- 
partments in cities of the first, second, third and fourth classes, has 
produced excellent results. This division has deviated from the general 
routine of previous years to the extent of making surveys of manufac- 
turing industries and food depots engaged in furnishing supplies to 
the army, for the purpose of recommending increased fire protection as 
well as the adoption of additional fire prevention measures. Our recom- 
mendations for safeguarding life and property in these various indus- 
tries are being given immediate attention. It is gratifying to report 
that in every instance the owners of these plants have shown enthusiasm 
and expressed a readiness to follow our suggestions. 

Under the supervision of the fire marshal department, the Conserva- 
tion Association of Indiana (composed chiefly of business men and in- 
spectors for insurance companies) has been in operation since April, 
1917. The object of this association is an exhaustive inspection of all 



270 Year Book 

grain elevators and food warehouses throughout the State in the interest 
of food conservation as a war measure. The recommendations of the 
inspectors are written on postcards, which are termed "requirement 
cards," and left with the owners or managers of the property inspected. 
When the improvements required have been made, the cards are dated 
and signed by the proper authority and mailed to the office of the fire 
marshal. In 936 inspections, 641 cards were left. Out of this number, 
445 cards have been returned to this office, showing that the recom- 
mendations had been carried out. The remaining plants represented in 
the outstanding cards are in process of improvement and will be re- 
ported, or reinspections will be made and reason for not reporting be 
ascertained. This is an exceptionally good record, considering the fact 
that 1,225 assignments were made to forty-eight inspectors. It is need- 
less to say that through the good work of the Conservation Association 
the great waste of food and property by fire experienced in former years 
has been reduced very materially, and this is especially desired during 
these exigent times. 

The department continues to work in conjunction with the State In- 
dustrial Board and the State Board of Health on matters requiring the 
united supervision of these departments. 

It has been the endeavor of this division to make a record of "ac- 
complishments second to none, and we are pleased to report the tangible 
fire prevention progress we have been able to make this year. With 
the present appropriation, however, it is . impossible to employ a suf- 
ficient number of inspectors to cover as thoroughly and rapidly as 
should be the vast territory over which this department has jurisdiction. 

ARSON INVESTIGATION AND LEGAL DIVISION 

In the laws of all civilized countries, arson has been looked upon 
and treated as a crime of the deepest atrocity. At common law, it con- 
sisted in the burning of the house of another, wilfully and of malice 
aforethought, and was a felony, punishable by death. In the long and 
painful history of the criminal law, it is said to have been the first 
offense in which the question of mens rea, or criminal intent, of the act 
was taken into account. In essence, the common law of arson remains 
substantially unchanged in the United States as well as in England, 
notwithstanding some statutory modifications and the general mitigation 
of the penalty incurred by the commission of the crime. Unless it re- 
sults, directly or indirectly, in the death of some person-^in which case 
it comes under modern definitions of the crime of murder — it is no longer 
punishable by death, but by imprisonment for periods varying with 
the degree or atrocity of the offense, sometimes for life. 

DEGREES OF ARSON IN INDIANA AND PUNISHMENT 

From the very beginning of the criminal law in Indiana, arson has 
been recognized as one of the grave crimes against the commonwealth, 
and is today, as are all crimes, made a crime by statute, there being no 
common-law offenses in our State. There are two degrees known to the 
law in Indiana, "arson in the first degree," and "arson in the second de- 
gree," 



State fwE Marshal 2fi 

The punishment for the commission or arson in the first degree is a 
fine of not to exceed double the value of the property burned, and im- 
prisonment for not less than two years and not more than twenty-one 
years; provided, however, that if any person's life be lost as a result 
thereof, then the punishment shall be the same as that for murder in 
the first degree. 

For many years, arson in the first degree was the only arson known 
to the criminal law of Indiana. However, in 1915 the Legislature pro- 
vided for a second degree arson, and fixed the punishment at not less 
than one year and not more than eight years. 

At common law, and also the statute defining arson in the first de- 
gree in Indiana, there must be a,n actual lighting and burning in order 
to constitute the crime, and it must be deliberate, and not accidental, or 
the mere result of carelessness. This is not the case under the statute 
providing for second degree arson. Under this statute, any act of prepa- 
ration to burn, coupled with the mens rea, or criminal intent, is arson. 

In Indiana, the attorney for the department of State Fire Marshal 
is required to assist the prosecuting attorneys in the prosecution of all 
arson cases in all the courts of this State. Newman T. Miller, since his 
appointment as attorney for the department April 27, 1917, has had 
charge of the investigation and prosecution of all arson cases. He has 
been assisted by Charles Hoover, arson investigator, and at times by 
other members of the Fire Marshal's staff. The following is a record of 
the work done by this division for the year ending September 30, 1918: 

Cases filed 39 

Convicted 21 

Acquitted 2 

Dismissed 1 

Pending 15 

Fires investigated 108 

Incendiary 44 

Unknown (suspicious) 7 

Unknown (not suspicious) 57 

Arson is a crime which is recognized in the law and by lawyers to 
be one of the most difficult upon which to obtain evidence and to secure 
convictions. This is true because the crime is generally committed or 
planned by men and women schooled and skilled in crime; educated, 
keen, and adroit planners and thinkers who have spent much of their 
time and energies thinking on criminal subjects. It can be said safe- 
ly, that incendiarism is a criminal science. New ways and new methods 
are being employed daily to do the deed without detection. If the plan 
succeeds, much of the evidence, if not all, is destroyed, and, as many 
times is the casQ, the fire occurring at a time when the person respon- 
sible for starting it is many miles away, thereby enabling him to prove 
an alibi; done often under cover of darkness when all neighbors are 
asleep, or during an electric storm, so that it will be thought that light- 
ning is responsible. 

Many are the methods and great have been the profits of the fire- 
bugs. The most active and skilled criminal minds of our state and na- 



272 Year Book 

tion are engaged in this destructive and atrocious industry. No other 
crime is so carefully and completely cloaked and shrouded with secrecy 
and cunningness as is the crime of arson. No other crime is so easily 
executed without the actual presence of the criminal, as is arson. No 
other crime can be committed, the success of which so completely de- 
stroys the evidence as in the case of arson. There is no more profitable 
criminal industry than arson. There is no better way for the alien 
enemy to wreak destruction than by this method. There is no more 
satisfying way for a man or woman to get revenge than by burning the 
property of his enemy. There is no mental relief for the pyromaniac 
equal to the seeing of a burning building. There is no better way for a 
criminal to hide or destroy the evidence in a prior and another crime 
than by burning the evidence or his victim. 

Notwithstanding the many difficulties that are hedged about the suc- 
cessful prosecution of arson, the records kept by the Indiana Fire Mar- 
shal show that since the passage of the Fire Marshal law, Indiana is 
rapidly becoming a place where firebugs may not operate with impunity. 

FIRE PREVENTION ENGINEERING DIVISION 

This division was created March 1, 1&17, and is under the super- 
vision of John C. Bagley, an experienced fire prevention engineer. 

State institutions. Shortly after the disastrous fire at the Indiana 
Reformatory at Jeffersonville, Governor Goodrich requested that the 
State Fire Marshal make a fire prevention survey of all the state in- 
stitutions, of which there are 25, representing a total replacement value 
of approximately $25,000,000. A survey of this kind had never been 
made before in this State, and to our knowledge only two States (Wis- 
consin and Texas) have made such an inspection. The survey is made 
along three distinct lines : 

(.1) Elimination of fire hazards; 

(2) Construction of buildings to confine a fire to a given space; 

(3) The extinguishing of the fire. 

The Governor requested that the facts regarding each and every in- 
stitution be given to him the same as they would be given to the man- 
agement of private or commercial institutions. Four copies of the re- 
port are made, one going to the Governor, one to the institution, one 
to the State Board of Charities, and one is kept for the office files. Up 
to September 80th, eighteen of the institutions had been inspected and 
reported upon. The remainder will be finished before the first of Jan- 
uary, 1919. When all are completed, it is the plan of this department 
to reinspect all of the institutions and make a condensed report covering 
the action that has been taken upon the various recommendations. 

There is no doubt but that this survey will be of great value in con- 
serving life and property, as a large number of the hazards have al- 
ready been eliminated, and ways and means for proper extinguishment 
of fires are being formulated. 

We have found that in most of the institutions there is a lack of 
proper fire equipment, as well as a need for proper attention to minor 
deficiencies and conditions that weaken the institution from the stand- 



State Fire Marshal 278 

point of fire prevention and fire protection. Remedies for these condi- 
tions have been taken care of in the recommendations. 

Fire departments. This department is now paying more attention 
to fire fighting facilities in the various towns and cities. Methods of 
fire fighting have made great advancement in the last few years. Today 
fire fighting is a science. When a fire occurs, it must be met with 
practical, scientific means of control. We have new types of buildings; 
new methods of construction; contents of buildings are, in many in- 
stances, of such materials as to bring forth new hazards and dangers, 
requiring promptness and efficiency in handling. 

There are three essential forces used in fighting fire: (1) Water 
system, (2) fire equipment and apparatus, and (3) firemen. 

Water system. In many of Ihe cities and towns, the water system 
has proven inefficient when called upon to furnish water for fire fight- 
ing. This department is endeavoring to overcome this inefficiency by 
surveying the water works systems, pointing out the weak features and 
making suggestions as to how a proper supply of water can be secured 
and the pressure maintained during fires. 

A new field of co-operative effort along lines of fire protection for 
cities was opened up when the Public Service Commission of Indiana 
made a ruling in July of this year that advance in rates for the fur- 
nishing of water to the town of Bourbon would be granted the United 
Public Service Company of Rochester, only upon compliance with recom- 
mendations of this department regarding the fulfillment of a contract 
with the city for furnishing water for fire protection. On September 
30th there were pending before this department for investigation and 
report, three other similar cases, and inspection and full reports are 
now under way. 

This plan will be systematically followed throughout the State and 
it will undoubtedly result in greatly improved conditions in cases where 
the public interests in this part of the contract have been lost sight of. 

Fire Equipment and Apparatus. Great improvements have been 
made in advancing the efficiency of equipment and apparatus in the 
last few years. The motor is displacing the horse, and the gasoline 
pumper the old steamer. In our surveys of the cities, we recommend 
to city officials the type of apparatus and equipment that should be 
used, and thus aid the cities in securing the most suitable and efficient 
apparatus. 

Hose Couplings. There are 189 towns and cities in Indiana using 
fire hose. Of these cities, only a small percentage can be of assistance 
to each other because of the lack of uniformity in size of hose couplings. 
There are forty-nine sizes of couplings now in use by the several fire 
departments. This department is now recommending the converting or 
change of couplings to standard, or the adoption of a plan of standard- 
izing the use of hose couplings suggested by the Fire Prevention En- 
gineer of this department. This work has begun, and it is hoped that 
within the next few months each and every fire department in this 
State will be so equipped that it can render to, or receive aid from, 
any other department. No State in the Union is so equipped. Is it not 
a sad commentary on forethought and efficiency when cities and towns 

18—13956 



274 Year Book 

go to heavy expense in purchase and maintenance of fire fighting equip- 
ment and then not be able to render assistance to a neighboring town, 
or receive it in time of dire need? Several instances have occurred 
in Indiana within the last two years where this lack of uniformity has 
resulted disastrously. 

This one improvement should result in a great saving of property in 
this State, and should eliminate one of the dangers of a general con- 
flagration. 

Firemen. Today, an up-to-date, wide-awake fireman is something 
more than a fire fighter. If he is skilled and efficient in the use of the 
equipment provided for saving the property endangered, he fulfills the 
requirements where bravery, alertness and sound judgment are neces- 
sary, and he should be accorded all honor and credit therefor. But 
there is as much, or more credit coming to him when he industriously 
uses the knowledge acquired from his close contact with and investiga- 
tion of fires and their causes in the inspection of property not burned, 
and eliminating the hazard before the fire occurs. 

The Legislature of 1917 recognized the economic value of such serv- 
ices, and amended the Fire Marshal law, making it the duty of firemen, 
in addition to their other duties, "to inspect all buildings, premises and 
public thoroughfares for the purpose of ascertaining and causing to be 
corrected any condition liable to cause fire, or any violations of any 
law or ordinance relating to the fire hazard or to the prevention of fires." 
This department is using every means possible to urge the firemen of 
Indiana to carry out the requirements of this law. If this is done, it 
is reasonable to count upon fewer fires in Indiana cities. 

EDUCATIONAL AND STATISTICAL DIVISION 

Through this division, all educational activities of the department 
are directed. Realizing that fire prevention is largely dependent upon 
the proper application of educational methods, full advantage has been 
taken by this department during the past year of every means of getting 
the subject before the public. Following are some of the methods that 
have been used by the department: 

Fire Prevention Day. Of great value in the centralizing of thought 
in the need of fire prevention is the annual observance of Fire Prevention 
Day, October 9th. The Fire Marshal has taken special pains to en- 
courage a general observance of the day in the public schools of the 
State, feeling that the proper education of our future men and women 
along fire prevention lines will accomplish better and more lasting re- 
sults than can be accomplished by any other means. On October 9, 
1917, this department distributed among the schools of Indiana thou- 
sands of fire prevention questionnaires and other pamphlets on fire pre- 
vention. Suggested programs for the observance of the day in the 
schools were acted upon by school officials throughout the State. In 
the absence of a Fire Prevention Day proclamation by the Governor, 
who was unable to act on account of illness, this department sent to the 
mayors of 100 cities suggested proclamations, with the request that the 
mayors call to the attention of the people of their respective cities. 



State Fire Marshal 275 

by way of proclamation, the necessity of erecting every safeguard 
against the danger of fire. This request was acted upon by a majority 
of the mayors. 

Public meetings were held in several cities on Fire Prevention Day, 
at which addresses were made by members of the Fire Marshal's force 
and other speakers. 

News bulletin. Another means of education has been through the 
issuance by this department of a news bulletin, which has been mailed, 
at irregular intervals, to all the newspapers of the State. The matter 
contained in the bulletin has been generously copied by the press, and 
has been of much value in spreading the gospel of fire prevention. 

County teachers' institutes. \ During the months of August and 
September, the Fire Marshal Department undertook the enormous task 
of appearing before all of the ninety-two county teachers' institutes for 
the purpose of getting the subject of Fire Prevention in the curriculum 
of the public schools. Sample copies of the booklet, "Safeguarding the 
Home Against Fire," prepared for the United States Bureau of Edu- 
cation, were left at each institute, and teachers requested to secure 
a sufficient number of the booklets to provide each pupil with a copy. It 
is our intention to follow up this matter closely, and ascertain the 
number of schools that have adopted the plan. 

State fair exhibit. During the week of August 31 to September 
7th, this department had a Fire Prevention Exhibit at the State Fair. 
Various fire prevention and protection appliances and materials were 
shown. Mr. Bagley and Mr. Peet, who were in charge of the exhibit 
during the week, were kept busy at all times answering inquiries of 
interested visitors upon fire prevention subjects. The exhibits proved 
so successful that the department has decided to make an effort to 
build, before the time of the next State Fair, a permanent building of 
sufficient size to permit of a more comprehensive display of fire pre- 
vention appliances. 

The municipal fire department. The experience of this office has 
shown that with the Fire Marshal Department as the directing force, 
the properly constituted municipal fire department furnishes the most 
practical solution of the problem of interesting the public in fire pre- 
vention measures. An important step toward utilizing the fire depart- 
ment as an active fire prevention agency was taken when the 1917 
Legislature amended the Fire Marshal law, requiring fire depart- 
ments of the first, second, third and fourth class cities to make quarterly 
and semiannual inspections of all properties except the interior of pri- 
vate dwellings. 

Richmond's excellent fire record provides a good example of what 
a modern fire department may accomplish in the reduction of fire losses. 
The per capita fire loss for the city of Richmond for the past nine 
years is only 40 cents, while the average per capita loss for eleven of the 
larger cities of Indiana for the same period amounts to $1.66, and for 
Indianapolis $2.51. 

To the Richmond fire department must go the largest share of credit 
for this wonderful showing. Fire Chief Miller has, for years, been a 
believer in systematic inspections by members of his department; co- 



276 Year Book 

operation between his department and the pubhc in the prevention of 
fires, and the development of his department into a highly efficient fire 
fighting organization. 

This department,, in view of the splendid results that have been 
achieved by the modern and efficient fire departments of Richmond, 
Muncie, Terre Haute, Gary and a few other Indiana cities, is strongly 
urging the reorganization of fire departments into fire preventing in- 
strumentalities as well as fire fighting organizations. 

Farm mutuals. This department has secured the services of many 
inspectors of Farm Mutual Insurance Companies in every section of the 
State for the inspection of farm property. This means of reaching the 
farmer with first-hand information relating to fire prevention matters 
should result in the saving of valuable and much-needed farm re- 
sources. 

There are many other sources for co-operative effort along fire pre- 
vention lines. More stringent building laws will eliminate a large pro- 
portion of preventable fires; architects and builders should be urged to 
build better buildings. This is all, however, largely a matter of educa- 
tion, and this department will continue to exert every effort toward the 
enforcement of fire prevention standards by every one concerned in the 
saving of property from destruction by fire. 

STATISTICAL WORK 

This department prepares at the end of each calendar year ten 
statistical tables, which are compiled from daily fire reports received 
from the 1,200 fire marshal assistants throughout the State. Owing to 
space limitations, only five of these tables are given herein. As fire 
loss statistics are of value only when kept by calendar years, we are 
giving herewith the figures for 1917, being the last full year preceding 
the preparation of this report. 

TOTAL NUMBER OP FIRES AND LOSS BY MONTHS 

Month. Number of Fires. Loss. 

January 546 $606,533 

February * 891 710,716 

March 653 1,198,772 

April 514 328,019 

May 501 437,920 

June 276 296,996 

July 309 448,942 

August 377 407.037 

September 345 . 400,120 

October 360 455,296 

November 378 223,144 

December 614 665,941 



Total 5,764 $6,179,436 



State Fire Marshal 



277 



f;AUSE STATISTICS 



Cause 


No. of 


Value of 
Buildings 


Vjilue of 
Contents 


Loss on 
Buildinji^s 


LosHon 
Contents 


Adjoining .... 


412 

2 

48 
28 

6 
87 

4 
74 
98 
83 

3 

9 
955 
82 
34 
23 
240 
104 
31 

1 
20 
19 

7 
15 

4 

9 

27 

.« 

5 

69 

41 

4 

116 

11 

18 

4i 

126 

267 

17 

1,423 

107 

80 

38 

13 

1 

14 

936 

6 


$925,995 

. 2,650 

353.4.S5 

114,815 

21,340 

281,289 

21,500 

745,725 

531,205 

106,220 

18,500 

64,200 

2.144,116 

002,850 

99,950 

136,200 

1,204,109 

870,965 

64,025 

400 

157,700 

448,400 

101,500 

36,950 

58.000 

5,225 

130,100 

17,400 

12,700 

248.475 

110,250 

49,000 

240,550 

9,240 

61,800 

70,150 

646,875 

494 238 

28,020 

3,018,985 

128,372 

2 808,235 

248,800 

24,250 

3,500 

17.550 

3,994,613 

27,000 


1933,507 

2,300 

143, 6&3 

62,689 

8,510 

102,684 

8,000 

218,290 

389,855 

68,470 

4,500 

55,900 

1,505,980 

247,075 

29,800 

50,600 

430.445 

378,740 

43.515 


^208 607 

'1.54 

13,075 

12,558 

485 

36,868 

1,050 

13,P0i 

26.969 

14,044 

10,025 

43.253 

489; 564 

114,583 

6,505 

4,449 

64,875 

13';,600 

1,572 

20 

8,911 

23,188 

15,091 

10,663 

1,035 

72 

13,237 

2,572 

204 

35 386 

8,111 

1,069 

9«,294 

1,640 

3,970 

9,702 

33,120 

198,497 

5,921 

242,966 

40,770 

68,835 

5,907 

6,050 

500 

14,420 

1,244,444 

•415 


{160,006 


Alcohol Kxplosion 


1,144 


Ashes vs. Wood... 

Back Fire 

BoiliPti Oil 

Burning Rubbish 


105,628 

13,745 

1.995 

11,992 


Candle 


660 


Careless Smoker 

Careless with Matches 

Chilfi with Matches 


8,058 
26,694 
13 687 


Christmas Tree. . . 
Defective Boiler 


1,315 
17.990 


Detective Flue 


143,716 


Defective Furnace . 


53,781 


Defective Grate 


313 


Defectivp Heater . 


1,227 


Defective Stove 

Defective Wiring 

Drapery vs. Pire 


46,788 

1.86,695 

1,006 


Electriclron 


116.400 

265,050 

17,300 

23,505 

83,000 


3,511 


E.xplosion of Chemic?.ls 

■^ilm l£;nited 


70,334 
6,215 


Fireworks 

Friction . . 


13,855 
35,250 


Fiimi^Hn.r 


20 


/ Gas Explosion 

Gas Tet 


47,541 

7,400 

4,600 

183,065 

25,075 

7,500 

221,301 

2,175 

186,100 

24,400 

104,220 

337,326 

3,785 

948,099 

84,710 

1,198,965 

148,950 

17,450 

6,000 

15,750 

3,235,859 

25,200 


2,980 
737 


Gas Stove Explosion 

Gasolene Explosion 


185 
83,987 


Gasolene Stove Explosion, . . 

Hot Iron 

Incendiary 

Incubator Lamp 


3,3.84 

442 

121,346 

710 


Kerosene Explosion 


3,248 


Kerosene Lamp 

Kerosene Stove Explosion . . . 

Ligntaing 

Overheated Smokehouse 

Spark from Chimney 

Spark from Locomotive 

Spontaneous Combustion . . 

Thawing Water Pipes 

Torch 


6.948 

17,873 

111,850 

1.931 

74,848 

24,S20 

48,904 

• 3.115 

9,218 


Tornado 


500 


Tramps 

Unknown 

Vulcani3ing 


12,294 

1.426,534 

960 






Total 


5,7f^ 


S21,513,420 


•512.025,269 


$3,294,067 


$2,885,369 



INCENDIARY FIRES 

Month. Number of Fires. Loss. 

January 11 $2,086 

February 4 6,274 

March 8 7,371 

April 16 19.075 

May 13 94,980 

June 15 19,640 

July 14 20,362 

August 9 4,S00 

September 8 4,125 

October 7 30,489 

November 7 8,928 

December 4 2,010 

Totals 116 $219,640 



278 



Year Book 



LIGHTNING STATISTICS 

Number of 

Month. Lightning Losses. Loss. 

January 2 $2,500 

February 15 22,900 

March 31 81,425 

April 14 19,235 

May 33 43,411 

June 48 54.840 

July 47 38,590 

August 28 23,935 

September .33 31,418 

October 15 40,793 

November 

December 1 • 4,300 

Totals 267 $313,347 

Total number of lightning losses .267 

Number of buildings not rodded 255 

Number of buildings rodded 12 

Barns struck by lightning , 164 

Barns in country .- 158 — 96% 

B,arns in country that had total loss 121 — 77% 

Loss to rodded buildings : . . ^ $13,502 

Loss to buildings not rodded 299,845 

Lightning losses in country. 200 

Lightning loss in country $266,477 



\ 



STATISTICS FOR DISTRICTS OUTSIDE INCORPORATED CITIES AND TOWNS 

Cause. Number of Fires. Loss. 

Adjoining 64 $68,881 

Alcohol Explosion 1 148 

Ashes vs. Wood 5 7,065 

Back Fire 3 2,815 

Burning Rubbish 14 15,247 

Careless Smoker 4 3,555 

Careless With Matches 13 15.465 

Child with Matches 15 12.600 

Defective Flue 327 444,570 

Defective Boiler 1 3 

Defective Furnace 7 32,165 

Defective Grate 2 100 

Defective Heater 1 125 

Defective Stove 33 28,7ll 

Defective Wiring 4 20,300 

Drapery vs. Fire 2 750 

Explosion of Chemicals 2 2,765 

Fireworks : 2 19,075 

Gas Explosion 3 1,435 

Gas Jet 1 3,000 

Gasolene Explosion 12 22,425 

Gasolene Stove Explosion 2 725 

Incendiary 24 35,527 

Incubator Lamp 5 1.800 

Kerosene Explosion 9 5,643 

Kerosene Lamp 10 8,449 

Kerosene Stove Explosion 18 19.815 

Lightning 203 276,398 

Overheated Smokehouse 8 6,955 

Spark from Chimney 156 137.270 



I 



State Fire Marshal 279 

Cause. Number of Fires. Loss. 

Spark from Locomotive 27 $53,045 

Spontaneous Combustion 7 15,010 

Tramps 5 11,550 

Unknown 294 812,700 

Total 1,284 $2,086,087 

Number of partial losses 669 

Number of total losses 615 



DEATHS AND INJURIES FROM FIRE 
1918 

Deaths. Injuries. 

^ Gasoline Gasoline, 

and Other and 

Month. Kerosene. Causes. Kerosene. 

January ■. 1 10 9 

February 8 5 13 

March 9 8 7 

April 4 5 4 

May 4 5 3 

June 5 5 9 

July 3 4 7 

August 7 6 15 

September 1 4 

Totals 42 56 71 

Total deaths 84 

Total injured 159 



Other 

Causes. 

15 

5 
22 

4 

8 
10 

9 
10 

5 

88 



FINANCIAL REPORT 

For period from October 1, 1917, to September 30, 1918. 
Total amount of warrants $34,997 68 

Salaries — Fire Marshal, deputies and clerks $20,452 

Transportation ,. 1,899 

Hotel expense and meals 2,802 

Livery hire 1,268 

Telegraph and telephone 400 

Postage 928 

Freight or express 11 

Office supplies, stationery and printing 1,930 

Furniture and fixtures 274 

Stenographers .• 861 

Witness fees 125 

Other expense of witnesses 758 

Assistants' fees 2,156 

Officers' and detectives' fees 7 

Extradition expense 5 

Obtaining evidence 3 

Special services 1,110 



$34,997 



REPORT OF STATE ENTOMOLOGIST 



FRANK N. WALLACE, State Entomologist. 

The work of the State Entomologist's office was greatly hampered 
the past year. This was due to the fact that the law places such a 
limit upon the salaries of the deputies that they could not afford to 
work for this office when they were able to secure similar positions 
with the Government at much higher salaries. At the coming session, 
the Legislature will be asked to raise the salaries of the deputies so that 
sufficient wages can be paid to secure the needed help. 

The office is in great need of a plant pathologist. We had one em- 
ployed, but the Department of Agriculture at Washington offered him 
nearly twice as much money as we could pay, so he is now working 
for them in a Southern State. The relation of insect injury to plant dis- 
ease is often very close and with a plant pathologist in the office much 
more efficient work can be accomplished along many lines. There are 
thousands of cases referred to this office each season for diagnosis and 
the parties want to know just what the trobules are with their plants. 
They should not be told in part and left in doubt as to just what must 
be done to save their crops, but they should be given all available in- 
formation pertaining to their problems. 

The florists of the State need and desire inspection of their green- 
houses, and this work should be done by a man who is well versed in 
floriculture, as well as trained in entomology. Such a man in this^ 
office would save the florists thousands of dollars each year. They want 
such inspection work now and they should have it. The office has given 
them every assistance possible with the means at its disposal, but a man 
should be assigned to this work so that any outbreak of insect pests or 
fungous diseases can be discovered and the proper recommendations 
made for their control. The florists have lost many thousands of dol- 
lars by having these pests and diseases. If the stock was properly in- 
spected before shipment they would be saved this loss. 

A larger appropriation from the Legislature is needed, as our work 
keeps increasing each year and all of it cannot be given as much at- 
tention as it should have with the funds at our disposal. Other States 
and the U. S. Department of Agriculture pay higher salaries for 
the same class of work which the deputies of this department do and 
we cannot keep our trained men with us. 

The State Entomologist's office now has a suite of three rooms in 
the remodeled basement of the State House. These quarters are the best 
it has ever had since the office was organized. We needed these rooms 
badly, for the old quarters were poorly ventilated, insufficiently heated, 
inadequately lighted and were most undesirable as office rooms. More 
and better work can be accomplished in these new quarters. 

NURSERY INSPECTION 

There were about 160 nurseries inspected this year and most of 
them were found to be in excellent condition, although growers had 

2S0) 



State Entomologist 281 

trouble in keeping enough help to have the places in good cultivation. 
There was less San Jose scale found this year than ever before. The 
nurserymen are continually on the watch for its reappearance and they 
now know how to eradicate it whenever it is found. 

A few growers, whose places were not in shape, were either refused 
a certificate or given an opportunity to clean up and a reinspection was 
made later in the season. 

This season several conditions existed which made the inspection 
work more difficult than in former years: The railroad service was 
not as efficient, many trains being taken from the roads and this necessi- 
tated longer stays in towns than formerly was necessary. The work 
costs more, not only due to the length of time required, but railroad 
fares were higher and hotel and livery expenses have increased about 
twenty-five per cent. 

The following list of names are those who were given certificates: 

Name. Address. Kind of Certificates. 

Abraham Brothers Martinsville General Nursery Stock. 

Allen, Chas. B West Baden Small Fruits. 

Allison Brothers Columbus Small Fruits. 

Anglin, Ed Atwood Small Fruits. 

Atkinson, Roy C Fowler General Nursery Stock. 

Baldwin, Wm Marion General Nursery Stock. 

Barnes, E. T Spencer General Nursery Stock. 

Barrett & Pixley Pekin Small Fruits. 

Beck, E. H Michigan City Small Fruits. 

Beckner, H. Q .Greenfield General Nursery Stock. 

Bennett, A. S Lafayette General Nursery Stock. 

Bennett, Mrs. M. C. & Song.Grandview Small Fruits, 

Berry, U. S Bethlehem Apple Stock. 

Bierly, Otis Borden Berry Plants. 

Bilingsley, S. & Son Greenwood General Nursery Stock. 

Blankerbaker, D. O Borden Small Fruits. 

Boiler, A. A Francesville Small Fruits and OrnamentaL 

Bolton, J. W W. Terre Haute General Nursery Stock. 

Bonames, G. W Milltown Small Fruits. 

Buck, H. F Elberfeld General Nursery Stock. 

Burkhart, H. A Indianapolis Shade Trees. 

Burkhart, Henry .Indianapolis General Nursery Stock. 

Busick, H. S Paoli General Nursery Stock. 

Bywater, Wm Borden Small Fruits. 

Cain, W. D Shelbum Small Fruits. 

Callahan, D. H Pekin Small Fruits. 

Campbell, Harry Warsaw Strawberry Plants. 

Cathcart, A. Y .Bristol General Nursery Stock. 

Cathcart, J. F Bristol General Nursery Stock. 

Cato, Thomas New Harmony Ornamentals. 

Coats, Marion Borden Small Fruits. 

Collins, Lamar .Underwood General Nursery Stock. 

Cook, J. L Warsaw Strawberry Stock. 

Cooley, Simpson Borden =Small Fruits. 

Cox, Jacob ^.Carlisle Strawberry Plants. 

Crowell, Frank Goshen Shade Trees and Ornamentals. 

Cutler, D. L Warsaw SmaiU Fruits. 

Cunningham, A. B Coliunbus General Nursery Stock, 

Daniels, Rebecca & Sons. . . .Bloomfield Apple and Peach Stock. 

Davis, D. C ; . . . .Fairmount Shade Trees. 

Durham, M. J Collegeville General Nursery Stock, 

Eickhoflf, H. O. & Sons Indianapolis Shade and Ornamental Stock 



282 Yeab Book 

Name. Address. Kind of Certificates. 

Ernst, W. A GoUegeville General Nursery Stock. 

Plrwin, T. J . Mt. Vernon Nut and Shade Trees. 

Evansville Nurseries Evansville Shade and Ornamentals. 

Everett, Joe W Hamilton Strawberry Plants. 

Fife, F. P Galena Berry Plants. 

Flory, A. E Logansport , Small Fruits. 

Fullhart, L. L Muncie , General Nursery Stock. 

Furnas, T. C Mooresville Raspberry Stock. 

Garr, M. H Cambridge City General Nursery Stock. 

Garrett, F. B Burns City General Nursery Stock. 

Garber, D. M North Webster Strawberry Stock. 

Girton, L. H Bristol Shade Trees and Ornamentals. 

Goehler, Albert Urbana General Nursery Stock. 

Goss, D. L Borden Small Fruits. 

Graham, Chas. F Jeffersonville General Nursery Stock. 

Gray, Earl .Salem General Nursery Stock. 

Gray's Nurseries Salem General Nursery Stock. 

Gray, W. E Borden Strawberry Stock. 

Green, Newton H Portland Strawberry Stock. 

Gray, Amos Borden Strawberry Stock. 

Gyseman & Beard Evansville Shade Trees and Ornamentals. 

Haas, Harry Terre Haute ■. General Nursery Stock. 

Hackler, O. P Elnora Ornamentals. 

Halbrook, Wm Evansville Shade Trees and Ornamentals. 

Halleck, Chas Fair Oaks General Nursery Stock. 

Hazen, Smith .Hatfield .General Nursery Stock. 

Henby, J. K. & Son Greenfield General Nursery Stock. 

Heller Bros Newcastle Greenhouse Stock. 

Herrington, F. A Macy General Nursery Stock. 

Hill, E. G. & Co Richmond Greenhouse Stock. 

Hill, Jos. & Co Richmond Greenhouse Stock. 

Hoagland, Geo Portland Strawberry Stock. 

Hobbs, C. M. & Sons Bridgeport General Nursery Stock. - 

Hobbs, Franklsm .Osceola Barberry Stock. 

Hoffman, R. P Paoli Berry Plants. 

Hofreiter, Andy N^ew Harmony Strawberry Stock. 

Hood, J. P Shelburn Small Fruits. 

Howe & Stansfield Scipio Pear and Apple Stock. 

Humfeldt, Simon .Muncie Ornamentals. 

Indpls. Flower & Plant Co. . Indianapolis Ornamentals. 

Ireland, Chas. A Brownstown Strawberry Stock. 

Jackman, H. E Waterloo Shade Trees. 

Jackson, Hamilton Borden Small Fruits. 

Keller, W. J..' South Bend Small Fruits. 

Kelley, Cecelia M Kokomo Shade Trees. 

Krider, Vernon Middleberry General Nursery Stock. 

Landis, Worthy. Angola Small Fruits. 

LaHayne, Wm Chesterton General Nursery Stock. 

Lemon, Fred H Richmond Ornamentals. 

LeRoy, Frank Laporte Small Fruits. 

Lewis, D. G Fairmont Shade Trees. ^ 

Long, T. A Elnora Berry Plants. 

Lucas, J. W. & Sons Bloomfield Peach Tree^. 

Lung, Nicholas & Sons Garrett Small Fruits. 

Maddux, C Muncie Small Fruits. 

Maheuron & Barrett Borden Small Fruits. 

Maheuron & Terrell Pekin Small Fruits. 

Marley, Elias Monrovia .Berry Plants. 

Mason, Mrs. F. A Columbia City Strawberry Plants. 

Mays, W. H Goshen General Nursery Stock. 

Merrill, H, R ,,,...,,. , Brownstown ,....,,,, .General Nursery Stock, 



State Entomologist 283 

Name. Address. Kind of Certificates. 

Miller, Arthur F Borden Berry Plants. 

MofRtt, Frank Carmel Strawberry Plants. 

Morton, John A Galena Berry Plants. 

Moyer, G. N Laketon General Nursery Stock. 

Murray, A. M Goshen General Nursery Stock. 

McClaran, Chas. T Ramsey General Nursery Stock. 

McCloughan, B. E Etna Green Strawberry Plants. 

McCormack, Chas Burns City General Nursery Stock. 

McCoy Nut Nurseries Evansville General Nursery Stock. 

McElderry, Wm. E Princeton General Nursery Stock. 

Mcintosh, Jas. L Martinsville Apple Stock. 

Nation, Chas Macy Berry Plants and Ornamentals. 

Neufer, Alfred Bremen General Nursery Stock. 

Nolen, C. E Orland Strawberry Stock. 

Osborn, Jas. T Burns City..^ Berry Plants. 

Overman, R. J Danville Strawberry Plants. 

Osborne, J. V Mooresville Small Fruits. 

Phillips, Joe Bloomfield Cherry Stock. 

Pierce, A. D Knightstown General Nursery Stock. 

Piers, Henry Borden Small Fruits. 

Piers, Hubert Borden .Berry Plants. 

Plotner, S. C Mishawaka Small Fruits. 

Portland Nursery Company .Portland General Nursery Stock. 

Preble, A. C Marion General Nursery Stock. 

Quillen, Chas. F .Mooresville Berry Plants. 

Ragle & Pope Elnora General Nursery Stock. 

Rathburn, Kenneth Orland Strawberry Plants. 

Rathburn, L. G Orland Small Fruits. 

Reed, W. C. Vincennes General Nursery Stock. 

Reed, W. H. Jr Hanover , General Nursery Stock. 

Rettic, W. D South Bend General Nursery Stock. 

Richardson, Oscar Angola Strawberry Plants. 

Robinson, Wm. H Lafayette Berry Plants. 

Roerk, F. M Borden Small Fruits. 

Roerk, T. J Borden Small Fruits. 

Rogers. R. S Winamac Small Fruits. 

Schxunaker, W. A Spencer General Nursery Stock. 

Rogers, Sig Bloomfield Small Fruits. 

Shileds, Harve Charlottsville General Nursery Stock. , 

Simpson, H. M. & Sons. .. .Vincennes General Nursery Stock. 

Smith, J. E Muncie General Nursery Stock. 

Smith, J. D. Jr .Tipton Apple Stock. 

Snoddy, S. A Lafayette General Nursery Stock. 

Sturm, Chas. C Elizabeth General Nursery StocK. 

Tate, Jacob & Son Mexico Strawberry Stock. 

Thornburg, G. H Evansville Shade and Ornamentals. 

Thornburg, J. H Booneville Nut Trees. 

Tine, Dallas Pekin Small Fruits. 

Uhl, Galvin , Danville Small Fruits. 

Warren, Daniel Carmel Small Fruits. 

Weilbrenner, Carl .Mt. Vernon General Nursery Stock. 

Wessel, Anthony Charleston Berry Plants. 

Whicker, Otto Amo General Nursery Stock. 

White, Harry North Manchester Ornamentals. 

Wilkinson, J. F Rockport Nut Trees. 

Wilson, Ellas Carmel Small Fruits. 

Winchell, O. W Tobinsport General Nursery Stock. 

Winklepleck, Jonas Burns City Berry Plants. 

Woodward, T. C Carlisle Small Fruits. 

Zeigler, Albert Bippus General Nursery Stock. 



2B4 Year Book 



IMPORT INSPECTION WORK 



There was less imported stock received in Indiana this year than 
during any previous year. Most of the stock that came in was in ex- 
cellent condition considering the length of time that it was in transit. 
The florists and nurserymen hesitate to place orders now for any import 
stock, except stock that is absolutely necessary, as it is not only high 
in price, but the shipping conditions such that it makes it an ex- 
tremely hazardous proposition to import it. It will probably be several 
years after the war is over before stock can again be imported in such 
quantities as it was several years ago. In the meantime much of the 
stock that was formerly imported will be produced on this side and it 
will be just as high grade and almost, if not quite as cheap in price as 
the imported stock. It would be a benefit to the country if no nursery 
stock were imported into this country, as so many insect pests and 
fungous diseases have been introduced on this stock that the Government 
now recognizes it as a menace and has been endeavoring to pass a law 
prohibiting the importation of all such except that recommended by the 
Department of Agriculture. 

STATE INSTITUTIONS 

There are about 7,000 acres of land farmed by the various State 
Institutions and early this summer Governor Goodrich requested that we 
send a representative of this office to each of the State Institutions to 
make such recommendations for the use of fertilizers and methods of 
farming and gardening as might seem proper. 

The work was not started early enough in the season to arrange 
systematic test plots, such as we would like to have seen established at 
each institution, but enough of the work was laid out so that at most 
of the institutions reliable data could be obtained upon which to base 
estimates for the use of fertilizers for next year's crops. Arrange- 
ments should be made to carry out this work on a more elaborate scale 
next year, and we hope that the benefits to be derived will not only 
come to the State Institutions, but that the people visiting these institu- 
tions will see the results obtained from these check plots and thereby be 
enabled to increase their own crops. 

On some plots extremely heavy fertilization was tried and the follow- 
ing quotation comes from Dr. J. W. Milligan, Superintendent of the 
Southeastern Hospital for the Insane at Madison: "With out late po- 
tatoes we applied 1,000 pounds of fertilizer per acre. This crop has not 
yet been dug, and is still growing. The results at this time appear to 
be very promising. A strip of this ground upon which we applied 2,000 
pounds per acre, at this time appears to have fully justified the heavier 
application. To sum up, we have secured excellent results wherever 
circumstances were such as to give the experiment a fair test." 

When the potatoes were dug on the plot where 1,000 pounds of fer- 
tilizer was applied the crop averaged over 200 bushels per acre. A two 
acre plot, in the same field and adjoining the fertilized plot, averaged 
less than 75 bushels per acre. This gives an increase in the yield due 
to the fertilizer of 125 bushels per acre. There is absolutely no doubt 
in this case that the heavy application paid many times over for its cost. 



State Entomologist 285 

The frost last summer did an immense amount of damage in the 
northern part of the State, and was especially severe at the School for 
Feeble-minded Youth at Ft. Wayne, Indiana. Dr. George S. Bliss re- 
ported that the frost nearly killed all their crops so that a reliable re- 
port could not be obtained on the results of the test plots. He added, 
however, that the yield of potatoes where phosphate was applied was 
almost double that produced on the plot that was not fertilized. 

Doctor S. E. Smith, Superintendent of the Eastern Hospital for the 
Insane at Richmond, Indiana, sent in the following report: 

Cabbage. "One field of six acres was set to Louisville D. and Late 
Flat Dutch cabbage from June 21st to July 3d. About one-third of the 
field was in cabbage last year and two-thirds in potatoes. The field 
was covered through the winter with about twenty loads of stable man- 
ure per acre. Three acres were fertilized with a fertilizer containing 
0.8 per cpnt nitrogen and 11 per cent phosphate, 800 pounds per acre. 

- "About one-half of the fertilized part was set to the Louisville Drum- 
head, which matured early and in which there was considerable loss 
from bursting. The remaining part of the fertilized ground was planted 
to Flat Dutch and the cabbage is fine; some of the heads weighing as 
much as 14^/4 pounds. The part not fertilized was the part which was 
in cabbage the year previous and was injured some with the wilt or 
cabbage rot, and spoiled somewhat the yield on that part of the field 
and .the effect of the comparison." 

Potatoes. "One field of 28 acres was fertilized at the rate of 450 to 
500 with a fertilizer containing 0.8 per cent nitrogen, 8 per cent phos- 
phate and 0.5 per cent potash, and planted with Early Ohios in April 
with an Aspinwall planter and the fertilizer applied in the row with 
the planter. A good stancf was secured on all but about two acres, 
which drowned out badly. These were replanted later, but were not 
so good as the balance of the field and cut the yield somewhat. The 
field was affected some by blight, which was sprayed twice with bordeaux 
the latter part of the season, but the crop was somewhat injured. A 
yield was secured of 4,172 bushels and 55 pounds. 

"Another field of 5% acres was planted June 12th to 14th with a 
late variety of potato and fertilized at the rate of 1,200 pounds per acre 
with a fertilizer containing 0.8 per cent nitrogen and 11 per cent acid 
phosphate. These were planted with an Aspinwall planter and fertilized 
in the row. The field was given four sprayings with bordeaux and was 
free from blight. The vines made a fine growth and covered the ground 
completely in September. The frost the latter part of September, killed 
a part of the vines and cut the yield considerably. A yield of 1,047 
bushels was secured; an average of 182 1/10 bushels per acre." 

Tomatoes. "One acre of tomatoes was fertilized 400 to 500 pounds, 
containing 0.8 per cent nitrogen and 11 per cent acid phosphate. No 
record of the difference in yield of the acre fertilized and the acre not 
fertilized was kept, but the fertilized acre made a much better showing 
and some fine specimens of tomatoes were grown; six tomatoes weigh- 
ing seven pounds. Nine hundred and fifty-six bushels were taken from 
the two acres. Some few late ones were not picked on account of the 
press of work filling silos, cutting corn, etc." 



286 Year Book 

Mr. C. E. Talkington, Superintendent of Indiana State Farm, Green- 
castle, Indiana, writes us as follows: 

"On account of the depleted condition of the soil on the State Farm 
we are obliged to use commercial fertilizer liberally. During the year 
1918 we used thirty tons for spring planting and twenty-three tons for 
fall planting, besides about ten tons of rock phosphate used in the 
stables. 

"Three hundred to 400 pounds per acre were used on early potatoes, 
but the yield was only about fifty bushels per acre on account of the 
drought. 

"Five hundred to 800 pounds per acre were used on onions, carrots, 
lettuce, etc., with very good results before the drought came. 

"Five hundred pounds per acre on tomatoes produced an enormous 
growth of tomato vines, but the drought and heat reduced the yield 
more than fifty per cent. We saved from five to six tons per acre. 

"Two hundred and fifty pounds per acre on poor, wet clay for corn 
was satisfactory beyond our expectations. We expected 25 to 30 bushels 
per acre and will get from 40 to 50 bushels per acre. 

"One hundred and fifty to 300 pounds was used on wheat. Our best 
yield on clay land was 27 bushels per acre and our average yield was 
21 bushels per acre. 

"1,200 pounds of fertilizer was used on part of the late potato plant- 
ing, but the potatoes have not been dug and no report can be made. 

"On an average we get splendid returns from the use of fertilizers. 
A high percentage of phosphoric acid gets the best results." 

REPORT OF STATE INSPECTOR OF APIARIES 

Inspection work, 1918 

Total colonies inspected 14,431 

Living colonies inspected 11,394. 

Dead colonies inspected 3,037 

Cases American Foul Brood 1,901 

Cases European Foul Brood 197 

Cases Pickled Brood 45 

Cases Paralysis 14 

Number box • hives 640 

Number cross comb hives 1,165 

Demonstration meetings 75 

Apiaries visited 1,044 

Counties visited 44 

The State Entomologist is also State Inspector of apiaries and is 
given the power to hire deputies to assist in carrying on this work. 
During the past season we had four deputies giving their entire time to 
this work. Two of them were temporary appointments and worked only 
during the months in which the inspection work could be carried on. 
They were all excellent bee-keepers. This year we accomplished more 
than twice as much inspection work among the bees as has ever been 
done in a single year in this office. Also more time was taken this year 
to see that the bee-keeper understood just how to handle his problems 
in regard to treating his foul brood colonies and producing more honey. 

The results of this inspection work are becoming more apparent 



State Entomologist 287 

each year and Indiana is rapidly coming to the front as a honey-pro- 
ducing State. The bee-keepers are producing more honey per colony 
than formerly and more of them are making this their principal busi- 
ness where heretofore it was a side line. 

Last winter caused a greater per cent of loss among the colonies 
than any since this office has been in existence. During one of the 
severe cold spells a high wind blew from the south and where the 
colonies were exposed to this wind the loss was very severe. Many bee- 
keepers lost their entire apiary and had to make a new start this year. 
Considering the number of colonies which were lost last winter it is 
remarkable that Indiana produced the honey crop which she did. A con- 
servative estimate of the crop this year would place it in the neighbor- 
hood of four million pounds. The bee-keepers are to be congratulated 
upon the effort they made to produce every pound of honey possible 
and upon the results they accomplished. Most of them have restocked 
their apiaries and are in shape to produce a banner crop next year. 
They realize that the honey produced will take the place of other sweets 
and they intend to save all the nectar possible. It is a crop that can- 
not be saved unless there are bees to gather it. 

Aside from the value of the honey produced, the bees are necessary 
for the pollination of our fruits, and this fact is becoming recognized 
more each year among the horticulturists of the State. 

About 13 per cent of the colonies inspected this season had American 
Foul Brood and when it is considered that the inspectors worked in the 
districts where the conditions are the most serious a big improvement 
can be seen over the conditions of previous years. European Foul 
Brood is rapidly being eliminated and this disease is not nearly so 
serious as it was a few years ago. If the State Entomologist's office 
had more money to spend on the bee inspection work both of the foul 
brood diseases could also be eliminated in a few years. The requests 
for inspection work during the season of 1919 already on file in the 
office will take more money than the office can spend on this work un- 
less the coming session of the Legislature makes a larger appropriation 
for the work. 

FINANCIAL statement 

October 1, 1917, to September 30, 1918. 

State appropriation $15,000 00 

Salaries : 

F. N. Wallace $2,500 00 

Clerks and deputies 7,608 16 

Miscellaneous, office and laboratory expense 811 24 

Freight, express and transfer 44 24 

Telephone and telegraph 80 83 

Postage 455 00 

Traveling expenses 3,346 57 

Total expenditures $14,846 04 

Credit returned to state 153 96 

^15,000 GO 



288 Year Book 

An itemized account of the above expenditures is on file with the Auditor of State. 
License Fund: 

Fees received for licenses issued to nurserymen, dealers and agents, engaged in 
selling nursery stock: 

Balance October 1, 1917 $839 00 

Receipts for current year 436 00 

$1,275 00 
Expenditures 50 00 

Balance on hand October 1, 1918 $1,225 00 



REPORT OF THE STATE VETERINARIAN 



L. E. NORTHRUP, State Veterinarian. 
DR. T. A. WALSH, Chief Quarantine Officer. 

HISTORICAL 

Looking to the future control of the health of live stock, the Legis- 
lature of 1901, by enactment, established the office of State Veterinarian. 
By this act the Governor appoints the State Veterinarian, who is em- 
powered to employ such other assistants as are necessary to efficient 
administration. Legislation to extend the powers of the Department was 
passed by the General Assemblies of 1911, 1913, 1915 and 1917. 

The work of the State Veterinary Department may be divided into 
four parts: Regulatory and Quarantine work; Meat Conservation work; 
Inspection work; and Research work. 

The State Veterinarian is directed by law to protect the health of 
the live stock; to determine the means for the prevention, suppression, 
control and eradication of contagious and infectious disease; to establish, 
maintain, enforce and regulate such quarantine and other measures re- 
lating to the movement and care of animals and their products, the dis- 
infection of suspected localities and articles, and the destruction of 
such animals and property as he may deem necessary; and to adopt such 
regulations as may be necessary for the carrying out of the legislative 
directions. 

Up to the present administration, salaried deputies, who were sent 
out from the Indianapolis office, and whose work extended throughout 
the entire State, were employed. Under the direction of Governor 
James P. Goodrich, the State Veterinarian's office was reorganized and 
expanded into the State Veterinary Department of Indiana. The fee 
system for services performed has been eliminated from the Department, 
the general work of the Department and the specific work of each of 
its members being done without cost to any of the beneficiaries. The 
benefits of the reorganization have been proved. More efficiency has 
been provided — ^more elasticity. The Department has been brought closer 
to the farmer and stockman, and this influence has had a good effect 
in educating the men of the live stock industry to the big co-operation 
which makes for more and better live stock. 

The State is now divided into eighteen districts. Each district is 
looked after by a deputy, a practicing veterinarian in that district, who 
is able to reach any point easily and quickly, to give first aid, to make 
diagnoses, establish quarantine and to do such other work as will pre- 
vent the spread of disease where it is found. These deputies were se- 
lected because of their professional efficiency and railroad facilities, but 
with no regard for political views whatsoever. The wisdom of this 
plan of administration has been apparent. With more live stock due to 
the war-time drive for larger production, there has been less disease, be- 
cause the Department has been betteV able to carry out the funda- 
mentals of disease control and to co-operate better with the practicing 

19—13956 (289) 



290 Year Book 

veterinarian and live stock owner in the production of more and better 
live stock. And this has been done at a greatly decreased cost, com- 
pared with the old system. 

THE NEEDS OF THE WAR 

The Department has been put on a war-time basis. If "food will 
win the war," it was early obvious that Indiana must produce more 
pork, cattle, horses, sheep and poultry. It was the patriotic duty of 
everybody — ^veterinarian and live stock owner — to work toward that end. 

An educational campaign was started, the campaign being carried 
on throughout the State. When the call came for more pork, more hogs 
were grown; yet the mortality rate was reduced. Farmers were asked 
not to sell brood sows when prices were tempting. They were asked 
to feed more hogs. As a result, many more thousands of hogs have 
been fed out on Indiana farms — 1,050,702 hogs, averaging 220^/^ pounds 
each, were shipped to the Indianapolis market during the first four 
months of this year, which is 362,932 more hogs than were shipped in 
during the same period last year, with an average of 25 pounds heavier 
to the hog. This makes an increase of nearly a hundred million pounds 
in pork shipments for the first four months of this year, over that of 
last year, during the same period, for the Indianapolis yard alone. This 
means a commonwealth increase of $8,000,000. 

Thus we see that. untold wealth has been created. The State has 
been benefited and the Nation made more efficient. At the same time an 
organization of men has been created whose hearts and souls are in 
the movement for more and better live stock. 

As near as we are able to ascertain, Indiana has not lost more than 
thirty hogs per thousand during the past year, the lowest mortality 
record in thirty-five years. 

The State Veterinary Department has been given all possible as- 
sistance by Purdue University, its scientists and extension men, and the 
county agents, co-operating with the district assistants of this Depart- 
ment. 

The State Veterinary Department has also been assisted by the Fed- 
eral Government, its trained men from the Bureau of Animal Industry 
working under the direction of this Department in disease control and 
in assisting local veterinarians and the live stock owners. 

The State Veterinary Department has been the center from which 
all these influences radiate. It is to this Department that all disease 
reports are made in compliance with the Indiana law. Farmers and 
veterinarians should know this, for there should be no delays in re- 
porting disease. Delays are costly, and epidemics may be prevented by 
prompt control measures after a disease outbreak. 

Let every stockman, every veterinarian, every citizen of Indiana 
know that it is his duty to report a disease outbreak among live stock 
to the State Veterinary Department, State House, immediately, and no 
time will be lost in getting a deputy to the suspected outbreak and proper 
control measures taken. 



State Veterinarian 291 

answering the cry for more meat 

Indiana has answered the call for more meat. She has produced 
more hogs, cattle, sheep and poultry. 

Hogs. Stockmen have seen the business reason for feeding hogs that 
come from other States where they cannot be fed economically. Feeding 
these hogs to market weight, adding one hundred to two hundred pounds 
per animal, means much to the State's production of pork — a big ele- 
ment in the education of the farmer in increased production and profit. 

The great bulk of these hogs has come through the larger stock- 
yards to Indiana through Indianapolis, Terre Haute, Ft. Wayne and 
Evansville. None are allowed to leave these yards until they are proved 
to be healthy, until they have bee^ double treated against hog cholera, 
and have been disinfected, so that they may be carried to the farms for 
feeding in the cleanest possible way. 

There is a big work to be done in stimulating the systematic breed- 
ing of young pigs in southern Indiana to be sold to the feeders of the 
corn belt in the northern part of the State. Thousands of these light 
feeding pigs can and should be raised. The supply cannot meet the de- 
mand. . This Department has on record large feeding companies who 
will contract to buy all light pigs which can be produced in the south- 
ern part of the State outside of the corn belt. Not only will this assist 
in the eliminating of troubles which arise in shipping hogs through 
many public stock yards and long distances for feeding purposes, but 
will also create a common wealth for Indiana. 

Watching hog cholera, the swine plague, and keeping its ravages 
to the minimum is important. Hog cholera infection is in all stock 
yards. The serum-virus treatment immunizes these hogs against this 
disease. Thus the correct administrative methods in stock yards, with 
every precaution to prevent disease, adds to conservation and production 
of hog life. ' 

Sheep. The Indiana farmer can raise sheep with great profit to him- 
self and added efficiency to the State. A concerted effort has been made 
to assist stockmen and farmers to obtain sheep and lambs for pres- 
ent needs, and thousands have been shipped into the State under this 
arrangement. More and more sheep should be bred and fed. Bred 
ewes and feeding sheep have been brought in in large numbers from 
other States. Lambs have been put on Indiana farms. This process 
should be continued, as it has been profitable for the farmer and has 
added meat and wool to the national supply. 

Cattle. Indiana is now reaping the larger benefit of the drive for 
more cattle started soon after war was declared. And the lesson of 
this larger production is the wisdom of it — as a wartime measure first. 
As in swine and sheep, breeding and feeding of cattle has been en- 
couraged, and bringing unfinished beef cattle to market has been dis- 
couraged. 

We are at this time encouraging the buying of thin female cattle 
from yards 'or farms to be fed through to spring on roughage. Where 
possible, calves should be secured and fattened out on grass next spring, 
keeping all the calves practically for feeding to quick beef a year later. 



292 Year Book 

Every precaution has been taken to make the handling and ship- 
ment of these feeding cattle safe, to prevent disease among cattle, 
particularly shipping fever (or hemorrhagic septicemia), which has been 
too destructive. Proper sanitary measures in shipping, assisted by 
immunization and careful inspection and watchfulness, has had a ten- 
dency to decrease this disease. 

Veterinarians have been cautioned to be careful in their tests of 
cattle for tuberculosis, and to the credit of the veterinarians it may be 
said they have been watchful in the detection of tuberculosis. The form 
of test used in Indiana for the past several years is that which is 
recommended by the Bureau of Animal Industry. The State law re- 
quires that an animal reacting to the tuberculin test be shipped to an 
abattoir where Federal meat inspection is maintained. 

Horses. The State has been asked for more horses. Not enough 
colts were produced during the past year, owing to the prevailing low 
prices, but more will be produced during the coming year. The war 
has taken so many horses, and will take so many more, that it is 
obvious that the supply must be increased. 

RENDERING PLANTS 

Rendering plants in the State have contributed much to the winning 
of the war in the reclamation of fats, oils, greases, fertilizers and other 
products from the carcasses of animals. This Department has en- 
couraged in every way possible the work of the rendering plants and 
has discouraged the burying of carcasses, which, by law in Indiana, the 
owner has the right to do. 

Reclaiming the products from these carcasses has been a highly pa- 
triotic work, and wealth untold has been saved the State and Nation at 
a time when every ounce of fat is needed. 

There are 105 of these plants, so situated that every community is 
served. They are under inspection from this Department, Dr. T. A. 
Walsh being the inspector in charge. The rendering plants paid to 
the State through this Department fees to the amount of $4,650 last 
year. 

The influence of these rendering plants is growing constantly, as 
well as their utility to the Nation. They should be equipped with the 
best machinery, that their purpose of reclamation may be realized to 
the extreme. 

The rendering plants give big service. By properly disposing of ani- 
mal carcasses, they assist in the control of contagious diseases, whereas 
by laxity in sanitation and without proper supervision and disinfection, 
they would become carriers of disease. 

The standard of inspection of these plants has been raised so that 
they are in a far better condition than ever before. While there has 
been no increase in the number of these plants, they have increased in 
utility so that much more work is being done by them, all this with 
better equipment and better sanitary conditions. 

In a few instances, licenses have been held up until the plants were 
put into the required sanitary and efficient condition. Any departure 
from the laws governing the rendering plants has met with prosecu- 
tion. 



State Veterinarian • 293 

veterinarians in service 

Many veterinarians of Indiana have gone into the war service. 
The army needs veterinarians, and Indiana has furnished her share. 
This makes it necessary for those remaining in civil life to do the work 
of brothers gone to war. All that means a speeding up, better organi- 
zation, better co-operation everywhere, a more intensive supervision of 
live stock. The veterinarian has a great work to do, and when he 
does it for public and national good, he serves well. 

The veterinarian must be thoroughly schooled. He must be a com- 
petent scientist, knowing the theory and practice of veterinary med- 
icine. Higher standards of education must be established and main- 
tained, for the care of all this live stock should be in the hands of 
men thoroughly trained for the work. Second only to human life in 
value is this animal life. Second only to real estate in taxable incomes 
is Indiana live stock. 

REMEDIES 

We have impressed on the farmers to beware of so-called "Remedies." 
Patent medicines are usually no better for the domestic animal than for 
the human. Farmers in Indiana have spent thousands of dollars dur- 
ing the past year for these proprietary remedies. The good derived 
from them is questionable and several cases have come to the notice of 
the Department where the use of these remedies was harmful. Farmers 
should see that these remedies meet at least all legal requirements as 
measured by Purdue University tests. 

Biological products, serums and vaccines for specific diseases, should 
meet with all the State requirements before they are used on domestic 
animals. Farmers, as well as veterinarians, should see that no manu- 
facturer of biological products deviates from the high standard of ex- 
cellence that the State demands. 

RESEARCH DIVISION 

Through the increased importation of all kinds of live stock it has 
been necessary to have access to a fully equipped laboratory, and to have 
one laboratory expert and one research field veterinarian in order to 
be able to examine specimens quickly. Dr. John D. McLeay, Professor 
of Bacteriology and Pathology at the Indiana Veterinary College, and 
Dr. H. J. Kannal have this work in charge. 

Practicing veteriharians are here afforded an opportunity to secure 
assistance of the highest grade in the diagnosis of obscure diseases. 

PROSECUTIONS 

Dr. T. A. Walsh, Chief Quarantine Officer of the Department, has 
watched violations of the laws governing disease control. On viola- 
tions of the laws, his investigations and gathering of evidence have 
been careful. He has had fifty-one prosecutions and as many con- 
victions. The lessons of these prosecutions and convictions have been 
far-reaching. 



294 Year Book 



BOOK FOR LIVE STOCK INDUSTRY 

A more elaborate publication has been issued by this Department 
— issued with an idea of presenting to everyone interested in the stock 
growing industry much information this Department is asked to give 
individuals. 

This book is intended to stimulate the production of more and bet- 
ter live stock; to bring about co-operation between the stock raiser and 
the veterinarian; to prevent disease by teaching disease control, and 
to give information intended to help the stock raiser in a business way. 

The shipping requirements of each State are published — ^what the 
stockman must do in shipping live stock into the State or breeding 
and dairy animals out of the State. Lists of all graduate and non- 
graduate licensed veterinarians are published, and also the secretaries 
of all live stock breeders' associations. 

The forms used in the administration of this Department are pub- 
lished. They contain valuable information and are worth studying. 
Indiana's laws creating this Department and developing and deter- 
mining the administration are published in this booklet — laws which 
provide the ways to disease control. 

Instructions as to sending pathological material for laboratory diag- 
nosis are given, that specimens may be properly selected and placed 
in sterile containers. This knowledge is important to disease control. 
Directions for making the tuberculin test are given; also directions for 
applying the ophthalmic mallein test for glanders, and instructions for 
filling out official health certificates. 

The object of this reference book was to eliminate a large percentage 
of long distance calls, expedite shipments of live stock, and give this 
Department more time for control of diseases of live stock. This book 
may be had on request from the Department. 

RECAPITULATION 

The live stock industry needs for next year and the years after the 
best possible co-operation by those interested in the industry. 

War with its sacrifices and horrors has taught us a lesson of effi- 
ciency, of conservation, of organization, of co-operation. 

But when the war shall have ended, when peace comes with its 
readjustments, rebuildings and rehabilitations, these lessons learned will 
fit us for growing more and better live stock. 

DIRECTORY OF THE INDIANA STATE VETERINARY 
DEPARTMENT 

L. E. Northrup, State Veterinarian Room 105 State House. 

Meredith Smith, Secretary Room 105 State House. 

DISTRICTS AND ASSISTANTS IN CHARGE 

District No. 1 Lake, Porter, Newton, Jasper, Starke, 

Dr. H. J. Kannal, Rensselaer. Pulaski. 

District No. 2 LaPorte, St. Joseph, Elkhart, Marshall, 

Dr. W. J. Armour, Goshen. Kosciusko, Pulton. 



State Veterinarian 295 

District No. 3 LaGrange, Steuben, Noble, DeKalb, Allen. 

Dr. Ed. D. Leach, Ft. Wayne. 
District No. 4 Whitley, Wabash, Wells, Huntinjjton, 

Dr. O. G. Whitestine, Huntington. Grant. 

District No. 5 Miami, Cass, Howard, Carroll, White. 

Dr. R. C. Julien, Delphi. 
District No. 6 • Tippecanoe, Benton, Warren, Fountain, 

Dr. G. M. Funkhouser, Lafayette. Montgomery. 

District No. 7 Clinton, Tipton, Boone, Hamilton. 

Dr. I. E. Scripture, Frankfort. 
District No. 8 Adams, Jay, Blackford, Randolph, Dela- 

Dr. J. S. Culbert, Portland. ware. 

District No. 9 Rush, Henry, Wayne, Fayette, Union, 

Dr. Jas. A. Dragoo, Connersville. one-half of Decatur, Franklin. 

District No. 10 .Madison, Hancock, Shelby, Johnson, Mor- 

Indianapolis Office, 105 State House. gan, Hendricks, Marion. 

District No. 11 Vermillion, Parke, Putnam, Clay, Vigo, 

Dr. T. a. Walsh, Brazil. Owen. 

District No. 12 Sullivan, Knox. 

Dr. J. M. Tade, Vincennes. 

District No. 13 Greene, Monroe, Lawrence, Martin, 

Dr. R. C. Applegate, Bloomfield. Daviess. 

District No. 14 Bartholomew, Brown, Jackson, Jennings, 

Dr. H. Lett, Seymour. Washington, Scott, one-half of Decatur. 

District No. 15 Ripley, Dearborn, Ohio, Switzerland, 

Dr. J. L. Axby, Lawrenceburg. Jefferson. 

District No. 16 Clark, Floyd, Harrison. 

Dr. C. F. Pangburn, Charleston. 
District No. 17 Gibson, Posey, Vanderburgh, Warrick, 

Dr. A. L. Marvel, Owensville. Pike. 

No appointeee Dubois, Crawford, Orange, Spencer, 

Perry. 

CHIEF .QUARANTINE OFFICER 
Dr. T. A. Walsh Brazil. 

INSPECTORS AT PUBLIC STOCK YARDS 

A. G. Feil and Roy L. Scott Indianapolis 

G. J. Behrens and W. H. Gruner Evansville. 

G. M. Funkhouser La Fayette. 

Ed. D. Leach Ft. Wayne. 

RESEARCH DIVISION 

John D. McLeay, Bacteriologist Indianapolis. 

H. J. Kannal, Field Research Veterinarian Rensselaer. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Appropriations 

Disease of Swine Fund $10,000 

Expense Fund 5,000 

Sheep Scab Fund 4,000 

Foot and Mouth Disease and Glanders Fund 50,000 

Total $69,000 

Expenditures 

Salary State Veterinarian $2,000 00 

Railroad Fares 1.306 63 

Hotels and Meals 978 26 



296 Year Book 

Livery Hire $269 44 

Office Supplies 375 62 

Express, Freight and Baggage 9 10 

Telephones and Messages 854 64 

Postage 366 11 

Office Assistants 1,445 00 

Field Supplies ^ 523 80 

Field Assistants 10,949 67 

Total $18,578 27 

Foot and Mouth Disease and Glanders 

Horses and 
Property Destroyed. 

December, 1917 $50 00 

January, 1918 75 00 

June, 1918 5 00 

Total $130 00 

Unexpended Balance, September 30, 1918 $50,291 73 

Receipts 

License fees collected from Rendering Plants ($50 each per annum) : 

Quietus No. 13885, for quarter ending December 31, 1917 $1,100 00 

Quietus No. 14246, for quarter ending March 31, 1918 775 00 

Quietus No. 14757, for quarter ending June 80, 1918 .1,700 00 

Quietus No. 15079, for quarter ending September 31, 1918 1,075 00 

Total $4,650 00 



I 



REPORT OF STATE SUPERVISOR OF OIL INSPECTION 



(Inspections from December 1, 1917, to July 1, 1918.) 

MARION CALDWELL, Supervisor. 

Revenue from the inspection of kerosene and gasoline for the above 
named period amounts to $69,556.17: 

Where Inspected. Bbls. Oil. Bbls. Gasoline. Fees. 

Akron 859 925 $105 80 

Alexandria 1,778 1,749 219 56 

Albion 1,266 1,627 170 60 

Anderson 5,786 11,959 1,077 17 

Angola 1,729 2,409 246 99 

Arcadia 786 1,399 133 80 

Argos y 520 902 92 71 

Attica 1,421 3,326 283 43 

Auburn 920 2,960 242 28 

Aurora 1,936 3,167 289 56 

Batesville 986 1,342 147 19 

Bedford 3,564 3,526 430 41 

Berne 1,076 1,698 170 27 

Bicknell 908 1,102 124 00 

Bloomfield 832 1,070 120 76 

Bloomington 2,691 2,862 339 49 

Bluffton 3,175 6,394 582 82 

Boonville 1,244 1,499 173 29 

Bourbon 769 1,285 129 87 

Brazil 4,230 6,263 624 19 

Bremen 631 1,071 105 26 

Broad Ripple 727 1,041 103 09 

Brook 325 1,330 104 25 

Brookston 291 855 70 78 

Brookville 1,749 2,726 252 45 

Brownsburg 454 . 911 81 90 

Brownstown 1,354 1,047 136 62 

Butler 673 1,550 144 04 

Cambridge City 1,016 1,575 167 48 

Campbellsburg 732 390 61 61 

Carlisle 774 1,272 120 53 

Cayuga 325 486 47 08 

Churubusco 1,077 1,278 152 55 

Clay City 1^184 1,872 187 23 

Claypool 927 764 109 88 

Clinton '..... 4.622 6,723 697 95 

Cloverdale 1,333 1,476 175 27 

Coatsville 701 800 90 53 

Colfax 533 1,304 109 77 

Columbia City 924 3,008 245 33 

Columbus 2,476 3,908 372 98 

Connersville 2,013 5,072 480 45 

Converse 968 1.579 162 86 

Corydon 521 252 50 47 

Covington 794 1,059 114 74 

Crawfordsville 3,525 9,468 781 99 

Crown Point 1,541 2.857 263 89 

Culver 231 550 50 73 

Danville 406 930 76 48 

Decatur 1,083 2,216 202 65 

Delphi 8,680 5,901 565 03 

Dugger 996 674 104 70 

Dunkirk ; 1,541 2,083 227 02 

Dupont 497 291 46 89 

(297) 



298 Year Book 

Where Inspected. Bbls. Oil. Bbls. Gasoline. Fees. 

East Chicago 979 2,494 $195 19 

Eckerty 122 ... 8 21 

Edinburg 781 1,219 113 69 

Elkhart 4,782 10,411 914 74 

Elwood .' 2,602 4,506 428 64 

Evansville 13,593 21,366 2,019 57 

Fairmount 1,792 3,623 335 60 

Farmland 784 1,121 119 29 

Farmersburg 764 1,427 143 48 

Flora 1,103 1,736 166 17 

Fortville 495 719 65 27 

Ft. Wayne 6,029 19,641 1,523 06 

Fowler 1,460 7,065 510 30 

Frankfort 2,259 5,404 527 57 

Franklin 1,887 3,469 405 38 

Fremont " 776 1,169 117 50 

French Lick 232 291 33 89 

Galveston 573 1,141 101 47 

Garrett 1,321 1,408 163 77 

Gary 4,968 12,313 982 25 

Gas City 1,311 995 137 88 

Geneva 1,246 1,195 155 13 

Glenwood 813 1,131 112 91 

Goodland 423 1,322 106 95 

Goshen 2,275 2,952 316 06 

Grabill 745 1,070 113 57 

Greencastle 1,929 3,452 361 63 

Greenfield 911 672 92 99 

Greensburg 321 1,064 82 50 

Greentown 1,793 1,820 222 29 

Greenwood 870 869 102 22 

Hagerstown 659 1,720 144 17 

Hamilton 628 964 97 81 

Hamlet 260 391 42 28 

Hammond 5,041 13,147 1,014 29 

Hartford City 2,832 2,678 329 10 

Haubstadt 624 1,133 107 31 

Hobart 1,648 3,985 332 82 

Hebron ^ 130 8 45 

Hope 283 528 47 08 

Huntington 3,750 7,659 715 69 

Huntingburg •. .' , . 1,012 803 109 05 

Indianapolis 28,038 70,120 5,280 51 

Jamestown 937 1,637 154 57 

Jasonville 1,773 2,190 218 04 

Jasper ■ 129 130 16 87 

Jeffersonville 1,613 1,537 194 33 

Kempton 905 1,494 149 32 

Kendallville 1,393 2,714 255 36 

Kewanna 680 962 99 31 

Kingman 658 918 92 78 

Knightstown 1,644 1,815 217 82 

Knox 842 1,062 120 82 

Kokomo 8,259 12,102 1,267 12 

Lafayette 4,239 14,500 1,113 00 

Lafountaine 1,286 1,424 163 20 

LaGrange 1,315 4,074 339 12 

LaPorte 567 707 85 17 

LaCrosse 130 130 16 90 

Laurel 782 996 103 39 

Lebanon 422 3.071 214 62 

Liberty 1,277 2,957 237 32 



State Supervisor Oil Inspection 



299 



Where Inspected. Bbls. Oil. 

Ligonier 1,500 

Lincoln City 861 

Linton 2,691 

Logansport •• 4,667 

Loogootee 1,035 

Losantville 1,053 

Lowell 712 • 

Lynn 1,188 

Madison 3,274 

Marengo 282 

Marion 7,727 

Markle 1,079 

Martinsville 1,500 

Medarysville is 454 

Middlebury 1,052 

Middletown 905 

Milan 946 

Mishawaka 1,192 

Mitchell 963 

Monon 612 

Monroeville 682 

Monterey 543 

Montezuma 725 

Monticello 1,025 

Montpelier 975 

Mooresville 1,584 

Morgantown 1,075 

Morocco 848 

Morristown 874 

Mott 202 

Mt. Vernon 1,275 

Mulberry 873 

Muncie 6,132 

Michigan City 

Milford. , 

Milroy 

Mooreland 

Nabb 205 

New Albany 8,762 

New Carlisle 

Newcastle 1,735 

New Paris 589 

Newport 681 

New Richmond 562 

Noblesville 1,269 

North Judson 704 

North Manchester 1,847 

North Vernon 1,453 

Oakland City 1,100 

Odon 608 

Orland 876 

Osgood 836 

Ossian 1,150 

Otterbein 902 

' Oxford 917 

Paoli 1,103 

Pekin 90S 

Pendleton 638 

Peru 3,859 

Petersburg 866 

Pierceton 675 

Plainfield ,...,...,,,,,,., 996; 



Bbls. Gasoline. 


Fees. 


1,908 


$206 89 


290 


70 93 


5,596 


516 76 


13,322 


1,056 83 


518 


96 64 


1,164 


134 76 


1,243 


122 35 


1,588 


165 18 


3,540 


413 69 


130 


26 01 


12,594 


1.205 68 


1,552 


160 83 


2.841 


256 08 


1,094 


96 49 


1,994 


186 93 


642 


96 46 


854 


108 57 


1,732 


178 72 


764 


110 96 


932 


91 82 


1,324 


128 43 


627 


71 53 


1.357 


130 71 


1,636 


174 73 


1,255 


139 70 


1.892 


209 08 


812 


115 76 


1,165 


119 54 


1,460 


147 37 




10 61 


2,439 


220 62 


1,392 


140 75 


11.656 


1,107 99 



291 


28 53 


12,735 


1,437 01 


122 


8 21 


3,319 


297 22 


1,841 


145 70 


1,030 


110. 48 


813 


86 75 


4,250 


352 11 


910 


98 47 


3.503 


324 24 


1.094 


158 34 


1,581 


162 33 


390 


59 79 


752 


98 89 


1,279 


127 15 


1.083 


137 69 


1,248 


132 74 


2.187 


184 12 


1.576 


171 37 


513 


88 13 


1,393 


124 43 


7,942 


763 46 


1,296 


137 42 


1,206 


112 58 


1,891 


172 46 



300 Year Book 

Where Inspected. Bbls. Oil. Bbls. Gasoline. 

Plymouth 659 1,361 

Porter 130 129 

Portland 2,588 3,382 

Poseyville 800 1,493 

Princeton 1,685 3,616 

Redkey 1,057 1,951 

Remington - 882 2,020 

Rensselaer 1,594 3,150 

Richmond 5,057 14,458 

Ridgeville 902 1,099 

Roachdale 1,345 2,704 

Roann , . 660 1,346 

Roanoke 997 1,345 

Rochester 831 1,925 

Rockport 1,451 1,104 

Rockville 1,186 2,256 

Rosedale 1,113 1,429 

Rose Lawn 658 996 

Royal Center 552 756 

Rushville 1,151 3,808 

Russiaville 713 1,523 

Salem 1,063 1.104 

Scottsburg 260 268 

Seymour 2,225 2,912 

Shelbyville 3,855 8,663 

Sheridan 1,109 2.552 

South Bend 7.034 23,406 

South Whitley 1,030 1.638 

Spencef 1,055 1.175 

St. Joe 874 1,460 

,St. Paul 957 1,724 

Sullivan 4,152 4,165 

Syracuse 1,461 1,854 

Tell City 129 

Terre Haute 10,080 27,146 

Tipton 1,609 3,609 

Union City 1,023 2,532 

Union Mills 129 

Vincennes 3,993 7,285 

Valparaiso 1,608 5,128 

Van Buren 983 882 

Veedersburg 1,270 1.707 

Wabash 2,247 5,858 

Walcottville 954 1,117 

Walkerton 444 552 

Warren 1,165 1,896 

Warsaw 1,668 3,149 

Washington 1,101 3.320 

Waveland 1,111 1.388 

Waynetown 460 1.175 

Westfield 925 2.341 

West Lebanon 1,822 4.414 

Westport 467 389 

Wheatfield 571 1.008 

Whitestown 569 824 

Whiting 2,291 2,898 

Winamac 1.002 1.761 

Winchester 1,459 2.164 

Windfall 802 1.114 

Woodburn 985 1.128 

Worthington 682 851 

Total 389.102 727,978 



Fees. 


$124 30 


16 87 


361 68 


146 14 


317 98 


181 24 


178 06 


297 02 


1,163 47 


123 73 


239 49 


123 88 


143 06 


178 23 


154 00 


207 91 


153 61 


99 67 


80 19 


303 47 


131 43 


137 81 


25 35 


304 21 


753 20 


223 58 


1,846 21 


161 94 


139 70 


138 92 


162 33 


400 60 


195 15 


8 42 


2,179 83 


311 21 


211 30 


8 42 


759 36 


408 31 


110 55 


180 37 


501 65 


125 86 


69 28 


191 90 


312 86 


282 13 


152 32 


99 10 


193 52 


387 28 


52 98 


92 87 


95 50 


651 98 


169 31 


223 44 


121 18 


129 09 


83 94 


$69,556 17 



REPORT OF INDIANA FREE EMPLOYMENT BUREAUS 



HENRY A. ROBERTS, Chief. 

The State Free Emplojrment Bureaus were created by the acts of 
1909 and 1911, and the laws made it mandatory that they be super- 
vised and under the jurisdiction of the Chief of the Bureau of Sta- 
tistics. 

The Bureau of Statistics was abolished by the Acts of 1917, and as 
the law pertaining to the Labor \Bureaus was not changed, the Chief 
of the Bureau, according to law, continued as supervisor of the State 
Labor Department. 

Formerly there were five State Free Employment Bureaus, located at 
Indianapolis, Evansville, Terre Haute, South Bend and Ft. Wayne, and 
it is gratifying to say that during the last twelve months of their 
existence, the number of persons placed was the greatest in the history 
of the Department, as more than 31,000 men and women were given 
employment. 

On August 15, 1918, as a war and economic measure, the State and 
Federal Labor Bureaus were consolidated, and since that time the Bu- 
reaus under the above named plan have been doing business in the 
above named cities. Each of the five former superintendents of the 
late State Free Employment Bureaus are now associated with the 
consolidated Bureaus, and each office makes a daily report to the Chief 
of the State Labor Department. 

The numerous private employment offices of the State are also under 
the supervision of the Chief of the State Labor Department, as the 
law requires that no person, firm or corporation shall in this State, 
open, operate or maintain, an employment agency where a fee is 
charged, without first obtaining a license for the same from the Chief 
of the State Labor Department, and executing a bond to the State of 
Indiana in the penal sum of $1,000. 

A license fee of $25 is charged^ and is held by the Chief of the 
State Labor Department, and applied to help defray the expenses of 
the State Labor Department, thereby making this Department partly 
self-sustaining. 

In former years some of the "private" agencies at that time would 
take advantage of the law and take the last dollar of the poor, and 
give them nothing but a "promise" in return. Now all that system of 
bad business has been eliminated and the private agencies of today are 
conducting their affairs on a trustworthy basis, conform to state laws, 
and make regular reports to this office. 

The motto of this office has been "To please and not disappoint both 
employer and employee." 



(301) 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS 
AND PROPERTY 



ROSCOE C. SHULTZ, Superintendent. 

The Superintendent of Public Buildings and Property is elected by 
a board, consisting of the Governor, Secretary and Auditor of State, 
for a term terminating with the option of the board, and qualifies by 
taking the usual official oath and executing a bond for $10,000. It is 
the duty of the Superintendent of Public Buildings and Property to 
take charge of, protect and preserve from injury the capitol building 
and grounds and all furniture and property connected therewith; to 
keep such building and property clean and in proper order; to attend 
visitors who may wish to view the capitol; to purchase supplies and 
make all necessary repairs on the capitol building; to employ all as- 
sistants and other necessary help who come under his supervision; to 
institute civil or criminal proceedings against any person for injury, or 
threatened injury, to the property under his care; to dispose of worn- 
out and unvaluable property, such as furniture, waste paper, books, etc., 
and make proper auditing therefor to the State Treasurer quarterly; to 
keep a complete list of all property of the State at the seat of govern- 
ment, with accurate plans and surveys of the public grounds whereon 
the capitol is situated, and report such property to the board on the 
last days of March, June and September of each year, and to the Gen- 
eral Assembly every two years, showing the purposes of the expenditures 
and appropriations made to his office. All official acts of the Superin- 
tendent are done only with the approval of the Board of Public Build- 
ings and Property. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Disbursements. Receipts. 

Salary $2,000 00 

Assistant 1,200 00 

Labor 16,972 22 

Repairs 6,995 15 

Water and Ice 2,079 75 

Illiiminating and Power 5,857 65 

Roof 249 19 

Flag and Decorating 149 00 

Receipts $587 17 

Totals $35,502 96 $587 17 



(302) 



REPORT OF ENGINEER OF STATE HOUSE 



ROSCOE C. SHULTZ, Engineer. 

The Engineer of the State House is appointed by the Superintendent 
of Public Buildings and Property, and is required to qualify by taking 
the usual oath and filing his bond for $2,000. It is the duty of the En- 
gineer of the State House to direct the ventilation of the several de- 
partments ; to have charge of the whole apparatus and all machinery and 
plumbing in connection with the state capitol'; to oversee the electric 
and gas lights and all machinery connected with the elevators; and to 
cause all necessary repairs to be made to the machinery and other ef- 
fects over which he has supervision. He is empowered to employ the 
necessary assistants in his department, not exceeding six persons, and 
each individual employed by him shall be skilled in the work that he is 
required to perform. The Superintendent, Engineer and all assistants 
connected with each of their offices possess common law and statutory 
power as constables in and about the state capitol and public grounds 
adjacent thereto, except that they are not authorized to serve civil 
process. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

Disbursements 

Salary $1,211 13 

Labor 5,558 00 

Repairs 5.998 72 

Heating ^. 4.996 70 

Total $17,764 55 



(303) 



REPORT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC 
INSTRUCTION 



Official Staflf 

HORACE ELLIS, State Superintendent of Public Instruction. 

B. J. BURRIS, Assistant Superintendent. 

ROBERT K. DEVRICKS, Deputy State Superintendent. 

OSCAR H. WILLIAMS, High School Inspector. 

HOWELL ELLIS, Manuscript Department. 

J. G. COLLICOTT, Assistant in Vocational Education. 

BERTHA LATTA, Assistant in Home Economics. 

Z. M. SMITH, Assistant in Agriculture. 

FRED GLADDEN, Clerk of the State Board of Education. 

JOHN B. WOOD, Bookkeeper. 

BERT MORGAN, Clerk of the Teachers' Retirement Fund. 

MAE CONOVER, Stenographer to Superintendent. 

ARDIS HESSONG,* Stenographer. 

GLEN ANDERSON, Stenographer. 

GRACE HORN, Stenographer. 

ROXIE REESE, Stenographer. 

STELLA OWENS, Assistant in Manuscript Department. 

NELLIE B. GRAVES, Assistant in Manuscript Department. 

HISTORY OF THE DEPARTMENT 

The constitution of the State of Indiana declares: "There shall be 
elected by the qualified voters of the State, at a general election, a 
State Superintendent of Public Instruction, who shall hold his office 
for two years." The statute of the State declares that the superin- 
tendent shall be charged with the administration of the system of pub- 
lic instruction and the general superintendence of the business relating 
to the common schools of the State and of the school funds and school 
revenues set apart and appropriated for their support. 

Under this constitutional warrant, and acting upon this legislative 
authority, two scores of men have served the Indiana common schools 
— among them men of brilliant scholarship, eminent patriotism, and 
broad vision. Not that they were greater in all respects than others 
who have filled this important place, but because they were exceptional 
in some essential respects, I may mention William C. Larrabee, the 
first State Superintendent; Caleb Mills, his successor; Barnabas Hobbs, 
James H. Smart, and D. M. Geeting. These men, stalwart defenders 
of the public school system, faced crises in the educational develop- 
ment of Indiana and stood four-squared against all attacks upon their 
personal characters as well as against those made upon public school 
education. The assaults that were made against these men and the 
policies they defended were vicious, persistent, and formidable; but, 
supported by an unfaltering faith in a democracy builded upon intelli- 

(304) 



Department Public Instruction 305 

gence, they emerged from all the conflicts like warriors bold, flushed 
with victory in defense of a just cause. I might advert to the brilliant 
scholarship of Samuel K. Hoshour, to the wonderful leadership of Mil- 
ton Hopkins, to the fine business ability of Hervey D. Vories — these 
fallen heroes — if a question were raised as to the dignity, the worthiness 
and the stern loyalty of these past leaders of education in Indiana. The 
record made by these men, to say nothing of the achievements of their 
successors still living, is unsurpassed for efficiency, conscience and cour- 
age. The heads of no other department of our state government have 
rendered a more constructive and conspicuous service to the State than 
these humble school teachers whose sole desire was to bequeath to 
futurity an institution which should be in every respect the dependable 
avenue toward an enlightened citizenship. And they were all elected 
by the people at a general election of the people under the provisions of 
the organic law of our land — having a keen appreciation of their ob- 
ligations to all the people, notwithstanding the fact that, like other 
citizens of the State, they acknowledged fealty to political parties which 
are the recognized instruments of administrative government. They 
belonged to political parties, and yet not an official act of one of them 
bears the impress of partisan bias. Dignity, judicial composure, con- 
science, vast intelligence, complete devotion to the public welfare — these 
evidences of a faithful stewardship appear in all the records of all the 
State Superintendents of Public Instruction of the State of Indiana. A 
firm determination to bequeath to posterity a system of instruction 
wherein the banker's boy and the shoemaker's boy alike might sit at the 
same fountain of everlasting truth, without money and without price, 
and satisfy their thirsting souls — this has been the impelling force in the 
conduct of the State Superintendents whose memory today is sacred to 

all who love the good name of Indiana. 

* 

THEIR RECOMPENSE 

It has ever been that the teacher (it was so in Cicero's time, it is 
true today) has never received a financial return for his labors com- 
mensurate with the character of the service performed. The public has 
recongized this fact, and yet the public has been extremely slow to take 
steps to correct the wrong. The salary of the State Superintendent in 
Indiana, strange to say, for Indiana's people are particularly fond of 
their schools, has always been greatly less than the salary attaching to 
the heads of other departments of our state government. And yet, judg- 
ing from their willingness to serve the State, their capacity to serve the 
State, and the real service rendered the State, probably no other depart- 
ment, save only the executive department, has merited as large a salary. 

Think of paying Barnabas Hobbs and James H. Smart and D. M. 
Geeting — giants in their day — a salary less than the salary drawn by 
clerks and deputies and chiefs of boards in our state government. But 
these great educational leaders sought, and obtained in a large degree, a 
compensati(»n which is not determined by dollars and cents — the grati- 
tude and affection of the Hoosier folk, the common people of our com-< 
monwealth, whose common appreciation and common decency can never 
be questioned. Even today, with all our wealth and with the vast num- 

20—13956 



806 ^ Year Book / 

ber of added duties and responsibilities of the Department of Public 
Instruction, the salary received by the State Superintendent is much 
lower than the salary of other departments of the state government 
whose duties and responsibilities sink to lower levels in comparison. The 
contention is not here raised that other departments of the State are 
overpaid, but insistence is registered that the Superintendent of Public 
Instruction, when the importance of the work done is considered, when 
the character of the men who have filled the position is taken into con- 
sideration, when the efficiency of administration is held in review, re- 
ceives a salary strangely out of harmony with the office. 

CONSTITUTIONAL AND OTHER CHANGES CONSIDERED 

Because of spirited contests in political conventions among aspirants 
for the distinguished office of State Superintendent, some of which con- 
tests have been, just as for other offices, quite spirited — rarely acrimoni- 
ous — it has been urged that a constitutional change in the mode of se- 
lecting the State Superintendent would be desirable. Various sug- 
gestions have been made. If a change should be desirable and the of- 
fice be made an appointive one, then, by all means, the Governor should 
appoint the State Superintendent, and the State Superintendent should 
answer directly to the Governor. Any other course is abnormal, 
basically wrong. 

If one mistake more evident than any other has been made by State 
Superintendents of Public Instruction, that error is the sin of omission. 
Because of lack of funds in days past in the Department of Public In- 
struction to prosecute all the work which belongs distinctly to the De- 
partment of Public Instruction, and because also other departments of 
the state government have assumed authority to act in certain school 
exigencies, certain distinctly school responsibilities have been transferred 
from the Department of Public Instruction to other bureaus and de- 
partments having funds with which to carry on needed work. Some 
such work has gone to the State Board of Charities, some to the State 
Board of Health, some to other boards and departments, because it could 
not be done by the Department of Public Instruction from lack of funds. 
This condition has prompted a more or less widespread belief among the 
people that the State Superintendent of Public Instruction has waived 
the rights and responsibilities of his office which legislative enactment 
imposed when it declared: "The superintendent shall be charged with 
the administration of the system of public instruction and a general 
superintendence of the business relating to the common schools of the 
State." The sad result of this dissipation of a central authority has 
been, in some respects, the development of a multiheaded system of edu- 
cational administration in Indiana. This policy has invariably led to 
indecision, hesitation and cross-purposes among township trustees, boards 
of education, county superintendents, and other school officers — the direct 
result of conflicting rulings upon the same question by different lawfully 
or unlawfully constituted authorities. This evil ought not t© exist. One 
minute's reflection upon the high virtues and the broad capabilities of 
the State Superintendents of Indiana suffices to give ample assurance 
that all school matters may be safely entrusted to the State Superin- 



Department Public Instruction 307 

tendent for final adjustment — the State Superintendent answering ex- 
clusively to the Governor of the State for his official conduct. 

THE state board OF EDUCATION 

The State Board of Education represents one of the bulwarks of our 
system. Its membership, as a rule, has been high grade and its serv- 
ices brilliant. Its usefulness may not be questioned, its importance may 
not be minimized. Its functions should never encroach upon the domain 
of the State Superintendent, which is to say, its duties are not adminis- 
trative. It ought to be, and, in a large sense it has been the cabinet of 
the State Superintendent — the great advisory body, the legislative body 
of our system to formulate rules and regulations, under the laws of the 
State, for the guidance of the executive office. Excepting the three 
heads of our state school institutions, the other members should be ap- 
pointed by the State Superintendent of Public Instruction and he should 
be restricted in his appointments to men and women who have served 
the public schools of our State brilliantly through a number of years 
before they are eligible to sit as members of this great body. The 
statute which gives membership to the three cities having the largest, 
second largest, and third largest population, respectively, should be re- 
pealed. The membership of the State Board of Education should be 
decreased as an economical measure. The State Board of Education, as 
a State Teachers' Training Board, should be relieved of the work of in- 
spection of institutions. The present practice secures unsatisfactory re- 
sults, and is very expensive. The Deputy State Superintendent of Public 
Instruction should do the work of actual inspection and report to the 
State Board of Education. The charge of corruption by sinister outside 
influences has been sometimes unofficially lodged against the membership 
of the State Board of Education. In most instances such charges are 
utterly without foundation. It is to be regretted, however, that certain 
men who have sat as members of the State Board of Education have not 
always been able to purge themselves of insistent charges that school 
book publishing companies have exercised a powerful influence over the 
deliberations of the Board. Some remedy must be available for this 
evil. I venture this suggestion: The State Board of Education should 
not be a Board of School Book Commissioners. That is distinctly not 
their business. Far other and far greater responsibilities ought to claim 
all their time and all their talents. As a matter of fact many of the 
members of the Board today delegate unto alien hands the task of de- 
termining their choices in the matter of school book selections. Immedi- 
ate steps should be taken to relieve the State Board of Education of 
this unnatural task. The Board itself would gladly be excused from it. 

I am proposing a plan, which if approved, would relieve the Depart- 
ment of Public Instruction and the State Board of Education of its 
deepest embarrassment and would, at the same time, guarantee ef- 
ficiency of the highest sort in the text-books adopted for the State. There 
ought to be selected for each adoption a School Book Commission of five 
men and women actively engaged in school work in Indiana at the 
time of their selection. The manner of selecting this commission of five 
school book commissioners should be as follows; The Governor of the 



/ 

/ 

308 Year Book 

State of Indiana, the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, and the 
President of the Indiana University should each place in a box, on the 
day the commission is to be selected, the names of five eminent Indiana 
educators, men and women, who are actively engaged in public school 
v^^ork at the time their names are deposited. Immediately after deposit- 
ing these names, which names should be on individual cards all alike 
so that to the touch of the person drawing them out no one ballot would 
be distinguishable from another (there would thus be fifteen names on 
separate ballots placed in the box), a judge of the Supreme Court, des- 
ignated by the Governor, should, blindfolded, draw from the box con- 
taining these fifteen names, five names of persons who shall constitute 
the School Book Commission for that particular adoption only: adequate 
provision being made for duplicate names, and for persons incapacitated 
from serving. This commission should sit one day in open session to 
hear the claims of representatives of publishing houses as to the merits 
of their respective publications. Then they should sit in closed session 
in the office of the State Superintendent of Public Instruction until all 
adoptions have been agreed upon. The severest penalties should be pro- 
vided against the giving out of any information whatever concerning 
the deliberations of this body when in closed session; and also the sever- 
est penalties should be provided against anyone who might attempt, 
directly or through representatives, to influence, in any way, the action 
of the commission. When the commission shall have reached an agree- 
ment as to the books selected, they should report to the State Superin- 
tendent and the Governor of the State the result of their deliberations. 

NEEDED EXTENSION OF THE WORK OF THE DEPARTMENT 

During the last two decades, educational thought in Indiana has been 
directed largely toward an effort to extend the usefulness of the high 
school to all the people of the State. Two scores of years ago, the high 
school was a negligible factor in the educational program of a vast ma- 
jority of our children. Today it may properly be styled "the people's 
college," since a fairly well ordered high school may be found in every 
considerable community. This extension of the high school work has 
furnished a great impetus to college attendance in Indiana, and the 
universities and colleges have advanced in their influence upon the life 
of the commonwealth by leaps and bounds. 

But there are some other extensions of popular education of the most 
impressive importance. The Department of Public Instruction needs a 
bureau devoted exclusively to the welfare of rural schools. I think it 
may be safely declared that rural elementary education has suffered 
grave neglect through the over-emphasis of some other phases of our 
educational program. It is a shame that men and women, the fathers 
and mothers of families in Indiana today, after three-quarters of a cen- 
tury of public school opportunity, exhibit such alarming evidences of im- 
perfect training in our elementary schools. It is hard to believe that 
such gross neglect of what might be termed the rudiments of learning 
appears in the correspondence, the conversation and the business trans- 
actions of men and women occupying responsible positions and who have 
had abundance of opportunity to be vastly better than they are. 



Department Public Instruction 309 

There ought to be in the Department a bureau of research, with a 
faculty of experts, whose business should be to gather for the State 
Superintendent, and therefore for the Governor, reliable data, and to 
recommend scientific procedure in matters affecting such basic consider- 
ations of citizenship as moral character, physical education, vocational 
education, education of subnormal or abnormal children, schoolhouse 
construction, avoidance and suppression of disease, dissemination of re- 
liable educational information through bulletins, means of co-operation 
with organized society, and a score of other questions vital to the highest 
welfare of a free people. Indiana can poorly afford to neglect the op- 
portunity she now has to do fundamental things for her citizenship 
through a well ordered, scientifically based, and sanely planned program 
of education such as a bureau of research would be able to formulate for 
the approval of its chief executive. 

I turn to the Year Book and find the total amount of money expended 
for administrative purposes by the State Superintendent of Public In- 
struction for the last fiscal year to aggregate $17,154. This sum seems 
trifling enough to do the work of the office as it existed thirty years ago. 
It is strangely insufficient for the present need* I note also that the 
State of Indiana expends $70,000 on its Board of Health, $19,049 for its 
Tax Commissioners, $55,912 for its Board of Accounts, $76,478 for its 
Industrial Board, $32,114 for its Board of Charities, $33,713 through the 
State House Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds, and so on to the 
end. It is not the contention of the State Department of Public In- 
struction that any of the funds hereinbefore enumerated are unnecessary 
or extravagant. It is the contention, however, with all our wealth and 
with all our faith in education, that vastly larger sums of money should 
be appropriated for the administration of the great system of public 
education in this State; for the maintenance of bureaus now existing, 
and for the establishment and maintenance of bureaus which ought to be 
created. It seems anomalous that Indiana should even consent to such 
a condition, for Indiana's pioneers, coming from a parent stock which 
thoroughly believed in the virtues of knowledge, set a dignified and beau- 
tiful example for their posterity through the establishment of academies 
on every hillside, even though the building of these temples of learning 
meant sacrifices we little dream of. It seems strange that straightfor- 
ward men, our lawyers, our clergymen, our business men, our farmers, 
should consent that any false economies should be practiced by the state 
government which would react against the public schools. It seems re- 
markable that Indiana educational leaders should have been satisfied in 
the days gone by merely to direct attention to these pathetic omissions. 
Out of the valleys of the beautiful Carolinas, in the olden time, into 
southern Indiana, came pilgrims whose first thought was the establish- 
ment of a haven in this western wilderness where their children and 
their children's children might know the happiness vouchsafed by the 
school and the church. From the rock-ribbed 'hills of New England, 
adown the beautiful Ohio, glided bands of home builders buoyant with 
lofty expectation for the future, but building their hopes entirely upon 
the silent guaranty of the school and the church. When these two 
streams of immigrants fused there was begotten a type of citizenship, 



310 Year Book 

known the world around as the Hoosier, whose faith is anchored ta the 
regeneration of the race through the influence of the school and the 
church — the foundation stones of an American home. It is amazing, 
therefore, that these sturdy folk themselves have not risen up to demand 
that the efficiency of the public schools of Indiana shall not be impaired 
through machinations of selfish men or through the misguided efforts of 
incapable men. 

A distinguished clergyman recently observed to me: "So unselfish 
and so democratic have been the supervisory efforts of your department, 
I have a deep seated conviction that all parochial and other church 
schools should have the benefit of the department's richer experience and 
more comprehensive supervision. I wish it were possible for you to lend 
the parochial schools and other church schools of the State the same 
serious consideration and attention that you do the schools supported 
by public money." 

Such a relationship under existing conditions is neither possible at 
this time nor desirable. I do believe, however, that all educational in- 
terests of the State should focus upon the Department of Public Instruc- 
tion and that this department should not only be willing but be able with 
its equipment and with its staff of experts to give expert co-operation to 
every branch of public education whether technical, academic, or special. 

THE teachers' RETIREMENT FUND 

I am pleased with the growing popularity of this beneficent law. I 
am gratified to know that the basic objections to it are disappearing; 
and that possible modifications of the law will make it not only thorough- 
ly legal but entirely acceptable to all the people of the State. Sentimen- 
tality in connection with this law should be utterly eliminated, and the 
one fundamental consideration for which the law was enacted, namely, 
the lending of assurance to teachers of long experience that they need 
not look with dread to the end of their careers, is being conserved. This 
law never was intended to benefit men and women who are able to take 
care of themselves, but rather to give to those wornout men and women, 
whose years have been spent in behalf of public education, full guaranty 
against the exigencies of old age. The law ought to be so definitely 
written that its fundamental purposes may not be obscured. 

HIGH SCHOOL INSPECTION 

There are eight hundred high schools in Indiana with but one high 
school inspector. By recent order of the Board of Education, county 
superintendents are made co-operating agents with the inspector for cer- 
tain services, and yet it is easily understood that the task is altogether 
too great for one man, however broad his intelligence and vast his 
capacity for work. Pennsylvania, Iowa, and other States have a large 
number of inspectors. In Indiana there is immediate need for three 
additional inspectors. With the close of the war a building program, 
which has been necessarily greatly interrupted, will be resumed with 
vast activity. Expert assistance in the location of buildings; in their 
construction to rnake them conform to pedagogic and economic data 



Department Public Instruction 311 

that have been scientifically established; in the correlation, of the work 
contemplated, with the course of study and with the local community 
need; must be available to every one of these high school centers. The 
task is important but is beyond the power of any one man to accom- 
plish. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

An epoch has been marked by the publication of a manual on physical 
education — one of the most complete and satisfying that has been given 
to the educational world by any source. In the program suggested there 
runs three parallel thoughts as follows : Physical education for boys and 
girls alike, in the open air, must be guaranteed as a health measure, 
as a reasonable sociological con^deration, and as a national asset; and 
spirit of competitive athletics, a distinctly American conception of edu- 
cation, is diligently cultivated and insistently urged; and finally, the be- 
lief that intellectual and ethical development depends largely upon a 
wholesome physical development. Ten years hence the most desirable 
results should accrue to the citizenship of Indiana because of the 
emphasis which shall hereafter be placed upon physical education. 

VOCATIONAL EDUCATION 

Necessarily the extension of vocational work to new centers is slow 
for obvious reasons. The newness of the appeal has disappeared, and 
many of the most pressing demands satisfied. However, the war has 
placed upon vocational education a new and important emphasis which 
the Department of Public Instruction has striven diligently to acknow^l- 
edge. Co-operation with every legitimate appeal of the Federal Govern- 
ment, in so far as the authority vested by law in the Vocational Educa- 
tion Committee extends, has been instantly accorded all agencies demand- 
ing it. The gratifying circumstance, the supreme detail, is the growing 
impression that culture can come from the study of handcraft as well 
as from intellectual reflection; and that vocational education possesses 
inherently all of those humanizing factors possessed by any other and 
all other agencies of popular education. The slogan no longer is merely 
to equip boys and girls for jobs but the feeling is today to give them 
hand potential, head potential and heart potential through vocational 
avenues just as these civilizing assets heretofore have been inspired by 
and through other agencies. Highly gratifying results have come from 
administering the funds donated by the Federal Government to our 
State under the provisions of the Smith-Hughes law. So satisfactory has 
been the Indiana response to all the demands made by the Federal 
Government in connection with this wise enactment of Congress that 
many other States in the Union have sought for information from In- 
diana as to the steps taken by this State to apply the funds wisely and 
efficiently under the exacting terms of the Federal statute. The people 
of Indiana ought to be fully apprised, through public announcement 
from the public press and platform, of the vast possibilities for voca- 
tional education when the maximum return from the Smith-Hughes law is 
available to 'Indiana. Meanwhile, every opportunity to promote con- 
fidence in the Federal enactment should be pressed. Agricultural edu- 



312 Year Book 

cation, home economics education, and industrial arts education, one time 
standing on very unstable foundations, today are in no jeopardy what- 
ever from financial storms. The grave question, which wise reflection 
alone can assure the proper application of this law to local conditions, 
is yet unanswered. The State of Indiana cautiously yet courageously 
essays the task of answering this question for the future as far as keen 
discernment into unforseen conditions may allow. The operation of the 
State Vocational law becomes easier as the years go by — so widespread 
is the confidence in the measure which was calculated to give concrete 
expression to things vitally connected with the active life of the people 
of our State. 

INSTITUTES 

The county and township institutes have caused serious doubts to 
arise in the minds of many Indiana educators as to the wisdom of their 
continuance. That their efficiency is much below what might be rea- 
sonably expected from them few people doubt. That they are vastly 
better and function to the advantage of the State far more efficiently 
than in days past, seems likewise self-evident. That they are indis- 
pensable to a well ordered system of public education may not be ques- 
tioned. The important consideration for Indiana is how improvements 
can be effected. From a careful study of the conditions which obtain 
today in reference to our county institutes, and from an intimate study 
of the individual counties, I am convinced that a remedy is simple and 
easily administered. Although the record will show that most of the 
instructors in our county institutes are men who have come into the 
State for the summer season from neighboring States to participate in 
this legally established agency of our public school system, the record 
also will disclose that year after year men and women of the highest 
talents and the loftiest abilities have thus placed their talents freely at 
the disposal of Indiana county superintendents. It would be difficult to 
express the obligation our schools must be under to such men and women. 
But year after year there come another class whose purpose seems to 
be to entertain the teachers in their institutes with semi-professional 
material the value of which occasionally is questionable. The State De- 
partment of Public Instruction should be made the clearing-house for the 
employment of institute instructors. Men and women should register 
with the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, furnishing to the 
Superintendent documentary evidence of their fitness to instruct Indiana 
teachers in the things Indiana conditions demand. From this list of 
registrants county superintendents should select, with the advice and 
consent of the State Superintendent, their institute instructors. The 
State Superintendent should be able to give the county superintendents 
expert information upon all registrants — the county superintendent in 
every case being allowed full authority to hire from this list whom- 
soever he might choose. Such registrants should pay an annual fee to 
the State Superintendent of $25, which should in all cases be turned into 
the Teachers' Retirement Fund. Many county superintendents pay im- 
ported talent as much as $150 to $250 for one week's service with their 
teachers. No institute instructor who is really able to instruct Indiana 



Department Public Instruction 313 

teachers would object to this assessment of $25 for the Teachers' Retire- 
ment Fund. 

The township institute is an integral part of our public school system. 
It has been authorized by law, and public money appropriated to insure 
its proper existence. It is designed to become the center for the dis- 
cussion of school organization, the course of study, classroom methods, 
the relation of school patrons to school practices, and the relation of 
teachers to their own profession. It affords, therefore, a splendid oppor- 
tunity for diffusing those elementary principles of democracy and com- 
munity life found in our social existence. Its real purpose is to serve 
the children of the community by providing the teachers with a proper 
perspective, a clarified vision, and a resolute determination to serve the 
State efficiently and completely. It is unthinkable that the duties in- 
cident to the program shall be performed in a perfunctory sort of man- 
ner, where indifference and dilatoriness evidence themselves anywhere. 
Calmness with enthusiasm, soberness with zeal, devotion with good cheer, 
all these things should mark every session of the institute. 

THE INDIANA SCHOOLS AND THE WAR 

It would be idle to reiterate Indiana's fine fidelity to the national 
needs in this hour of destiny. Moved by conceptions of duty based upon 
a tradition that is replete with loyal service, and upon an intelligence 
inspired by lovers of the republic, Indiana has done her part unhesita- 
tingly in every war emergency. The schools have kept abreast, with the 
foremost suggestions of our Governor and the council of war at Wash- 
ington. It may be safely affirmed that, without exhortation from any 
other higher source than their traditional regard for the Nation, the 
schools would have taken the lead in every phase of this war program. 
In the sale of Thrift Stamps, in devotion to the Junior Red Cross, in co- 
operation with the Boys' Working Reserve, in the advancing of food con- 
servation and food production and in the actual assistance in preparing 
the public mind for the Liberty Loans, the Indiana schools have found 
boundless joy and indescribable happiness. But there is one thing that 
gives the schools peculiar cause for gratification. With all this co- 
operative effort the schools have stood resolutely against any infraction 
of child labor laws. Childhood is sacred, childhood is holy; every child 
has a right to satisfy his innate love for play, his inborn inclination to 
be happy, his indisputable right to be a child. Not military considera- 
tions, not commercial demands, not sociological appeals can argue in 
favor of denying the child these rights heaven-born. The schools are 
happy today in the thought that public opinion supports and will support 
their unalterable opposition to any attempt which may be made by men 
unfamiliar or disregardful of these child rights, to set aside the pro- 
visions of our child-labor laws. 

CONCLUSION 

Since the dawn of recorded history man has sought his own. emanci- 
pation. The tyranny of might and of wrong have been steadily denied 
and almost destroyed. Man today dreads not the mailed fist of a tyrant 



314 Year Book 

leader or the pirate inclination of haughty tribes. The great emancipa- 
tion — the unshackling of the mind and heart — is still in progress. Slow- 
ly and steadily the vision of the race is clarified and broadened as hu- 
manity looks out upon the world from the eminence of knowledge and 
ethics. The clouds are below and the horizon is greatly extended. There 
came into Indiana a century ago some men and women who believed that 
the largest service they could render the commonwealth was a service 
which affected posterity. They were the humble school teachers of our 
fathers' days. Without ado, these emancipators of our Hoosier folk 
quietly admonished men to listen to the music of the stars and to note the 
cause of the returning seasons. They directed the attention of the set- 
tlers to the phenomena of nature and the mysteries and glories of God. 
They pointed to the triumphs of the poets and the philanthropists as the 
things abiding and most to be desired. They built modest little log struc- 
tures up and down the State whose simplicity and meager equipment 
provoke even today mirthful reflections. Occasionally they erected a 
more pretentious building which they proudly labeled the academy. 
The program of exercises in these early schools included many things 
which modern thought call commonplace, unnecessary, and unscientific. 
But the final intention of these teachers was the breaking of the bonds 
which tied men to whim, superstition, and fear. They urged men, in the 
face of danger and stress, to be calm; in the heat of discussion, to be 
temperate. They believed the greatest victory a man could win is the 
victory over himself — the subjugation of his animal inclinations, the 
controlling of unreasonable ambitions, the curbing of abnormal ap- 
petites. They sought his complete freedom through the emancipation 
of all those qualities which belong to man at his best. Their work goes 
on today. Mighty strides have been taken but the ideals toward which 
they hav.e been advancing these years, and which are exemplified in the 
life of the Great Teacher — the author of the Beatitudes — are still ahead, 
and shall probably never be attained. And today, persistently as the 
schools urge efficiency in vocations, the main insistence of the public 
school system, made glorious by the fine devotion of a thousand men 
and women of unselfish inclinations, is that men and women, the 
product of the public schools, may be true. Transformations un- 
dreamed of in the civilization of our common country, and of the State 
we love so well, have been wrought by a system of public education all 
too meagerly supported in the past by public funds. The days and the 
hours call loudly for such sacrifices in behalf of popular education as 
men are willing to make for other enterprises. Where now we spend 
thousands, we ought to spend tens of thousands; and where the figures 
mount into the millions, those amounts should be doubled. Economy 
recommends a new appreciation of the emancipators of our civilization so 
that the quality of our teaching may be improved by the employment of 
men and women as teachers who have had years and years of serious, 
systematic training in our colleges and universities. It is a shame that 
to inexperienced youths, however noble in their aspirations and lofty in 
their purposes, should be entrusted the responsibility of directing the 
energies of our future citizenship — the boys and girls of our land. When 
these children ask for bread they are given a stone, and when they 



Department Public Instruction S15 

plead for sympathy and love, too frequently indifference is the answer. 
That our teachers are vastly better prepared than the teachers of the long 
ago may not be questioned. But that they are, in too many instances, 
incapable of rendering the State the important service which the State's 
best interest demands, may not be questioned. I plead, therefore, for 
such support of the common schools of Indiana as shall give teaching 
faculties to the rural schools, to the high schools, to the normal schools 
and colleges, which may be able to satisfy the longings of every am- 
bitious boy and girl in the commonwealth. When this simple duty of the 
State is satisfied then shall our benevolent institutions and our reforma- 
tory institutions and our almshouses and our criminal courts very large- 
ly become mere dismal memories^of an uncertain past. Common justice 
demands that every boy and every girl, when he or she shall hear the 
call of Heaven — and they do hear that call today just as in the olden 
time — may be afforded such co-operation from the State in the way of 
educational advantage as shall satisfy, to the last degree, every right- 
eous ambition of the heart. We talk freely about our millions spent for 
education; we ought to talk more freely about the millions which should 
be spent. Whenever the General Assembly convenes and our great State 
University, which is indeed, as it was intended by its founders to be, "the 
crowning glory of our public school system," asks for a modest sum to do 
that part of the State's business so vital to the State's happiness, some 
men and women, moved by a spirit of false economy, gather together to 
deny and to question and to hinder. Whenever the public school system 
recommends and urges the expenditure of larger sums of money to do 
the State's business as it knows the State's business should be done, 
forthwith false economists arise to declare against the program and to 
hold up in bewilderment their tax duplicates. Millions wisely expended 
for education in Indiana is the safest investment the State, can make. 
We may not plead inability; we may not point to past achievement; 
great as these may, at first blush, appear, they do not possess even the 
semblance of reliability when the real question of economy, democracy, 
institutional life, and the happiness of the citizenship is considered. 

Like the silver notes of the cathedral chime come the appeals of In- 
diana's leaders of educational thought to Indiana's people in behalf of 
the public schools of our State. Nothing threatening, nothing overbold, 
nothing flamboyant in the call. Steady, insistent, gracious, courageous, 
always with confidence, the call is made without selfishness and solely 
with a desire to serve the commonwealth. Indiana's future lies not in 
her agriculture or commercial resources, great as they are; not yet in 
her past achievements, glorious as they have been ; Indiana's future rests 
largely with herself — in the sort of support she gives to the common 
schools in this State which are indeed the sheet-anchor of our liberties 
and the full guarantee of the perpetuity of our institutional life. 

EXPENSES OF STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

1. Per diem members $745 00 

2. Mileage members •. 1,990 50 

3. Inspection of schools 510 00 

4. Committee work 1.085 00 

5. Making questions, grading manuscripts and holding examinations 947 50 



316 Year Book 

6. Salary of Clerk $1,500 00 

7. Stenographer 462 98 

8. Burford Printing Company 5,290 10 

9. Fort Wayne Printing Company 4,410 05 

10. Castor Brothers, printing 28 75 

11. R. Sanders, indexing school laws 59 37 

12. Elizabeth Daily, salary and traveling expenses; physical culture work 166 28 

13. Stamps 700 00 

14. Stenographer, high school inspector 796 85 

15. Horace Ellis traveling expenses 156 90 

16. Clerk of State Board, traveling expenses 19 61 

17. B. J. Burris, traveling expenses 59 71 

18. Howell Ellis, traveling expenses 9 65 

19. Labor, mailing government bulletins ! 23 50 

20. Clerical help 796 77 

21. Miscellaneous 36 70 



$19,795 22 



EXPENSES OF STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

(By Individual Accounts and Other Expenses.) 

1. Charles O. Williams $1,015 55 

2. W. L. Bryan 226 30 

3. W. E. Stone 221 80 

4. W. W. Parsons 308 00 

5. George R. Grose 217 40 

6. E. U. Graff 340 10 

7. S. L. Scott 531 40 

8. H. G. Brown 418 16 

9. L. P. Benezet 757 20 

10. Frank Duffy 196 30 

11. A. M. Hall 529 69 

12. R. W. Himelick 516 10 

13. Clerk of State Board of Education 1,500 00 

14. Wm. B. Burford, printing 5,290 10 

15. Ft. Wayne Printing Company, printing 4,410 05 

16. Stamps 700 00 

17. Stenographer 462 98 

18. Horace Ellis, traveling expenses ,. 156 90 

19. B. J. Burris, traveling expenses j 59 71 

20. Clerk of State Board, traveling expenses 19 61 

21. Labor, mailing government bulletins 23 50 

22. R. Sanders, indexing school laws 59 37 

23. Castor Brothers, printing 28 75 

24. Stenographer, high school inspector 796 86 

25. Howell Ellis, traveling expenses t 9 65 

26. Elizabeth Daily, physical culture work 166 28 

27. Clerical help 796 77 

28. Miscellaneous 36 70 

Total $19,795 22 



EXPENSES OF STATE BOARD OF SCHOOL BOOK COMMISSIONERS 

Per diem of members $60 00 

Examination of books 1,100 00 

Advertising 223 31 

Total $1,383 31 



Department Public Instruction 317 

expenses of state board of school book commissioners 

(By Individual Accounts and Other Expenses.) 

W. L. Bryan $5 00 

W. E. Stone 105 00 

W. W. Parsons 105 GO 

George R. Grose 105 00 

S. L. Scott 105 00 

E. U. Graff 105 00 

A. M. Hall 105 00 

R. W. Himelick 105 00 

C. O. Williams 105 00* 

H. G. Brown 105 00 

L. P. Benezet x 105 CO 

Frank Duffy 105 00 

Indianapolis News, advertising 135 31 

Indianapolis Star, advertising '. . 88 00 

$1,383 31 

Total expenses of State Board of Educatiion $19,795 22 

Total expenses of State Board of School Book Commissioners 1,383 31 

Grand total $21,178 53 

PERMANENT COMMON SCHOOL FUNDS 1918 

Amount held by counties June, 1917 $9,572,619 16 

Amount added from all sources 224,499 26 

Total $9,797,118 42 

Amount deducted from counties during year 28,706 51 

Total amount held by counties June, 1918 $9,712,506 20 

CONGRESSIONAL TOWNSHIP FUND 

Amount held by counties June, 1917 $2,480,521 19 

Amount added to counties during year 5,538 78 

Total $2,486,059 97 

Amount deducted from counties during year 533 77 

Total amount held by counties, 1818 '. $2,485,526 20 

Number of acres unsold land 679. 6 

Value of unsold land $39,215 00 

CONDITION OF SCHOOL FUNDS 

Condition of Common School Fund 

Amount of fund safely invested $9,529,076 88 

Amount of fund not safely invested 23,768 98 

Amount of fund not invested and in county treasuries 

drawing interest from counties 215,566 05 

Total ■ $9,768,411 91 



Sl8 Year Book 

Congressional Township Fund 

Amount of fund safely invested $2,376,630 71 

Amount of fund not safely invested 6,899 46 

Amount of fund not invested and in county treasuries 

drawing interest from counties 101,996 03 



Total : $2,485,526 20 

SUMMARY OF FUNDS INVESTED 

Amount of both funds safely invested $11,905,707 59 

Amount of both funds not safely invested 30,668 44 

Amount of both funds not invested and in county treas- 
uries 317,562 08 

Total $12,253,938 11 

REPORT ON DEFICIENCY FUND 

1. Number of corporations that submitted requests for aid ' 134 

2. Total of claims filed by 134 corporations $160,382 54 

3. Number of corporations that received aid after proper 

corrections were made 125 

4. Number of counties having corporations that received aid 25 

5. Amount of money available for distribution $155,071 10 

6. Total distributed to 125 corporations entitled to aid after 

proper corrections 152,118 58 

7. Balance left in treasury after distribution.. 2,952 52 

8. Total daily wages 4,100 15 

Bartholomew County, 1 corporation $382 05 

Brown County, 6 corporations ' 11,692 11 

Clark County, 2 corporations 1,393 05 

Clay County, 1 corporation 409 76 

Crawford County, 13 corporations 16,939 40 

Dearborn County, 2 corporations 432 98 

Dubois County, 4 corporations . 4,618 11 

Floyd County, 1 corporation 554 59 

Gibson County, 2 corporations 1,593 56 

Greene County, 4 corporations 6,536 82 

Harrison County, 13 corporations 22,710 28 

Jackson County, 3 corporations 5,796 39 

Jefferson County, 2 corporations 1,544 65 

Jennings County, 3 corporations 5,347 63 

Lawrence County, 3 corporations 1,646 64 

Martin County, 6 corporations 4,630 37 

Monroe County, 8 corporations 7,346 78 

Orange County, 5 corporations 6,377 00 

Owen County, 6 corporations 3,193 84 

Perry County, 6 corporations ■. . 17,643 07 

Pike County, 4 corporations 4,451 00 



Department Public Instruction 319 

Spencer County, 4 corporations $4,454 28 

Switzerland County, 6 corporations 3,411 35 

Warrick County, 6 corporations 12,689 62 

Washington County, 9 corporations . . . . ^ 6,323 12 



$152,118 58 
Counties, 25; corporations, 125. 

SCHOOL REVENUES, 1918 

Tuitions distributed by County Auditors in January, 1918 $4,628,398 50 
Tuitions distributed by County Auditors in July, 1918. . . . 5,583,665 60 
Special school distributed by County Auditors in 1918. . . . 12,515,861 22 



Total $22,727,925 32 

ENUMERATION OF SCHOOL CHILDREN, 1918 

(6 to 21 years of age) 

White males .- .389,613 

Colored males 9,195 

Total m.ales 398,808 

White females 369,065 

Colored females 8,995 

Total females 378,060 

Grand total 776,868 

Total number of white children 758,678 

Total number of colored children 18,-190 

Grand total 776,868 

Enumeration, 1917 774,642 

Increase 1918 over 1917 2,226 

Enumeration in townships 381,432 

Enumeration in towns 43,077 

Enumeration in cities , 352,359 



776,868 

INDIANA HIGH SCHOOLS 

I. Survey of Progress (1917-1918) 

During the academic year 1917-1918 noteworthy progress was made 
in the general supervision and administration of the high schools. In 
spite of war-time conditions, and the resulting strain imposed by in- 
creasing costs, restricted revenues, and disintegrating personnel of 
teaching staffs, the efficiency and morale of the high schools were mani- 
tained at a high potential. Real advance was made in the direction of 



320 Year Book 

more flexible curriculum requirements, more rigid inspection with follow- 
up reports of progress, and closer oversight of private and denomina- 
tional schools as regards their relations to the State. Response on the 
part of the high schools, as of the colleges, to various forms of war work 
has reflected high credit to the spirit and aims of the public high schools. 

THE NEW CURRICULUM 

Perhaps the most notable single achievement of the year was the 
adoption in theory and application of a principle of curriculum develop- 
ment, which, while amply safeguarding the common basis of academic 
studies, permits in any given case a high degree of flexibility and adap- 
tation to local or community needs and resources. Progressive school 
men have long contended that the earlier high school course of study, 
though considerably liberalized in 1912 by a lessening of the foreign 
language and mathematics requirements, was too rigid and narrow in its 
scope to permit the high schools to respond to the demands of modern 
life. The schools are hampered, they said, in their effort to work out 
industrial or prevocational courses, to say nothing of broader cultural 
lines. 

In response to a growing demand for greater freedom to the schools 
in organizing courses suited to their respective conditions, the State 
Superintendent delegated to a special committee, consisting of members 
of the State Board of Education and of a conference of principals and 
superintendents, the State director of vocational education and the high 
school inspector, the task of recommending a more liberal system of 
curriculum arrangements. On June 21, 1918, this committee, after a 
thorough study of the question, made a detailed report to the State 
Board of Education. This report was approved and embodied the fol- 
lowing plan of election by majors and minors : 

(Major means three years and minor two years.) 
Group I 

Academic high school subjects required of all: 

(1) One major consisting of English. 

(2) A second major selected from methematics, foreign language, science 

or history; or two minors selected from the same range of studies. 

(3) One year in each of the following subjects must be included in the 

above, or taken as additional work: 

(a) Mathematics, one year. Either formal or applied mathe- 

matics; i. e., shop, commercial, household, etc. 

(b) Science, which may include general science, one year. 

(c) History, which may include civics, one year. 

Group II 

Purposeful curricula, from which not more than fifty per cent of the 
subjects counting toward graduation shall be counted. Each special cur- 
riculuiji shall be divided into two parts: 

(1) Essential subjects. 

(2) Related subjects. 



Department Public Instruction 321 

Each special curriculum shall also consist of majors and minors. 

A pupil graduating from a given purposeful curriculum, shall have 
completed at least one of the following: (a) one major from this special 
curriculum, or (b) two minors from same, or (c) one minor in each of 
two special curricula which contribute to the pupil's purpose. 

The remaining four or five units are elective from the range of studies 
of either group I or group II. 

With the opening of the schools in September, a large number of 
high schools took advantage of the new arrangements and inaugurated 
differentiated courses, expanding and enriching their curricula in the 
direction of individual and community needs. 

4 

WAR WORK IN THE HIGH SCHOOLS 

As noted above, the war has imposed heavy burdens and responsi- 
bilities upon the high schools. It has also brought to them unusual op- 
portunities for service. It is not too much to say the Indiana high 
schools have met both with results that reflect the highest credit upon 
their spirit and personnel. 

Near the middle of the school year the growing scarcity of adequately 
trained and experienced teachers, due to the selective draft and the 
voluntary withdrawal of teachers to enter more remunerative lines of 
work, began to be felt seriously throughout the State. When the schools 
opened in the fall, the situation was acute. Unfilled vacancies were 
reported on every hand. The crisis was met in part by the voluntary 
service of teachers in retirement, who, imbued with the spirit of sacrifice, 
came forward to fill the gaps left by the younger men and women. 

As a means of following up the inspection visits, the county super- 
intendent, just before the opening of the schools in the fall, makes to 
the State Superintendent a full and comprehensive report on the progress 
in fulfilling recommendations made by each of the schools inspected 
during the previous year. 

The kinds of war service rendered by the high schools are innumer- 
able. Aside from special courses, such as first aid, emergency work, 
military training, historical background of the war, and courses for con- 
scripted men in radio and buzzer work, the high schools have taken a 
leading part in publicity programs, in promoting war savings certifi- 
cates and liberty loans. Many high schools registered 100 per cent in 
membership subscriptions. Another important war service rendered by 
the high schools was their contribution to the morale of the fighting 
men through school letters to former students now in the trenches, 
suitable memorials erected in the school buildings, trees and shrubbery 
planted to keep green the memory of the boys who have fallen, and like 
activities. 

INSPECTION OF THE HIGH SCHOOLS 

By an order approved June 21, 1918, the county superintendent is 
made jointly responsible with the state high school inspector for the 
inspection of the high schools within his county, under the following 
rules : 

1. All primary inspections, for first accreditment (in the general 
sense) must be made by the high school inspector in person, 



322 Year Book 

2. All secondary inspections for advance in or restoration of ac- 
creditment, must also be made by the inspector in person. 

3. All other inspections, whether for reissuing (after expiration) or 
continuing accreditment, may be made by the county superintendent act- 
ing as co-operating agent under the direction of the inspector. 

In all cases in which the county superintendent is directed to act as 
co-operating agent, he has full power to enforce the rules and regula- 
tions of the State Board of Education, to recommend the extension or 
withdrawal of accreditment, and to prescribe the conditions on which 
accreditment may be extended. 

THE PRIVATE HIGH SCHOOL OR ACADEMY 

In addition to the laf ge number of public high schools, there are dis- 
tributed in various centers of the State creditable private schools which 
are engaged in important educational work. Some are survivals of the 
old academy which was the forerunner of the modern high school; others 
represent a differentiation of the multiform types of modern educational 
work. Many are denominational, or parochial, preparatory schools; 
others preparatory departments for normal schools or colleges; still 
others fitting schools for eastern universities. Suffice to say that where 
the private school does not merely duplicate the work of the public high 
school, it often renders essential service in a highly complex society. 

Prior to the year 1918 about thirty-five of these schools held cer- 
tificates of equivalency from the State Board of Education, thus giving 
their graduates the privileges of the commissioned high school diploma, 
viz., entrance without examination to college, and legal qualification 
(after added professional training) to teach in the public schools. 

Early in the year 1918, by a special order, the State Board of Educa- 
tion required the private schools to fulfill the same requirements as the 
public high schools in order to hold accredited standing. That is, these 
schools must meet the prescribed standards as regards teaching staffs, 
curriculum of studies, school plant and equipment, and reports and 
records of work. Partly as a result of this fair but more rigid rule, 
partly owing to the growing competition with the public high school, 
several of the private schools discontinued their existence as such, or 
were merged with the public»high school in the same community. 

In August and September, 1918, twenty-four private schools cheer- 
fully signified their willingness to comply with the requirements and 
made their annual report to the State Superintendent of Public Instruc- 
tion. These schools now continue to hold their accreditment. Earlier in 
the year, a conference of representatives was held in the office of the 
State Superintendent and a common understanding attained as to the 
operation of the new requirements. 

STATUS OP THE UNACCREDITED HIGH SCHOOL 

Below the standard accredited secondary schools in Indiana, there 
has long existed a type of no-called high school, unclassified and un- 
recognized, whose product, owing to conditions under which their work is 
dpne, is to say the least often of doubtful value. Usually with a course pf 



Department Public Instruction 823 

two or three years in length, with a single teacher to administer the 
entire curriculum and one or two upper elementary grades in addition, 
with little or no equipment, with a handful of pupils, these high schools 
represent the low tide of achievements. Sometimes set up in a rural 
school, with a resulting drain upon the community the township trustee 
against the earnest advice of the county superintendent and the wishes 
of the patrons, in order to "save"' to the township a few dollars of 
transfer money, these schools were often better discontinued entirely or 
consolidated with other nearby high schools and brought to an accredited 
status. \ 

A county superintendent describes one of these high schools as fol- 
lows: "The one such school is held in a poor building; the library has 
but few books of any value; there were but 17 pupils enrolled last 
September, but only 8 are members of the school at present; there are 
but two members of the second year; there is no school spirit, due partly 
to the community and partly to the fact that there is no competition 
or rivalry among the pupils owing to the small number. A thorough 
investigation of these high schools during the past year revealed that 
there are in the State a total of 97 such "moonlight" schools, enrolling 
more than 2,500 pupils, and employing nearly 170 teachers. The quality 
of the work done in many of these high schools raises seriously the 
question whether their maintenance is not a waste of public money. 

Pupils from these unrecognized high schools usually seek entrance to 
the commissioned high schools to complete their work. Experience has 
demonstrated that while occasionally a pupil coming from such a school 
is able to do creditable work in a standard high school, yet in the 
majority of cases their ability to carry advanced work is very limited. 

Recently, the State Board of Education, which prescribes the stan- 
dards for accrediting high schools and places a premium on schools 
which meet the required standards, authorized the state high school 
inspector to administer an examination to pupils seeking advanced credit 
in a certified or commissioned high school for work done in a non- 
accredited high school. The examination was set for the months of 
August and October, 1918, and conducted by the county superintendents 
in their respective counties and graded by the State Superintendent of 
Public Instruction. 

GROWTH OF THE JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

Indiana, along with other progressive states, has been touched by 
the spirit of reorganization of the secondary school along the line of the 
six-six or six-three-three plan.' Early in the y.ear a questionnaire was 
sent from the State Department of Public Instruction to a large number 
of schools whose annual report indicated some form of modified or- 
ganization. A high percentage of returns was received. The result 
indicated that one hundred eleven school systems had some modification 
varying from the six-two-four to the twelve-year unit school. 



824 



Year Book 



TABIDS AND SUMMARIES 
Total Existing High Schools 



Total number commissioned high schools 

Total number cer'iified high schools 

Total iiumber accredited hip;h Gchools. 

Total number private schools with commissioned high school equivalency. 
Total munber of high schools with no standing 

[' I, Grand total rumber of high schools , . . . . 



1915-1916 


1916-1917 


1017-1918 


535 


673 


583 


127 


113 


118 


45 


53 


62 


45 


44 


43 


117 


64 


97 


869 


847 


903 





INCREASE OF HIGH SCHOOLS 
(Five-year period.) 






ScHOOi. Year 


Total 

School 

Enameratibn 


Total 

Enrollment 

in All Schools 


Total 

Enrollment 

in High Schools 


Tot^i Nnmber 
High School 

Teachers, 
Principals and 
Superintendents 


Total 

Nnmber 

High Schools 


IPIS— 1914 

1914—1915 

1915—1916 

1916—1917 

1917—1918 


766.383 
768,622 
774,342 
774,642 


548,497 
552,927 
564,252 
567.952 


59,822 
64,404 
69.651 
72,883 


3,307 
3,696 
3,926 
4,242 


628 
719 
809 
847 
903 















65,829 



ENROLLMENT IN HIGH SCHOOLS 

Commissioned High Schools — 1916-17 1917-18 

Boys 31.207 

Girls 34.622 

Total 

Certified High Schools — 

Boys 1,882 

Girls 1.815 

Total 

Accredited and Unclassified High Schools — 

Boys 1.250 

Girls 1,270 

Total 

Grand total 

Graduates of High Sdhools 
Commissioned High Schools — " 1916-17 

Boys : 4.604 

Girls 5.733 

Total 

Certified High Schools- 
Boys 315 

Girls 289 

Total 

Grand total • 



2,520 



72,046 



1917-18 



10,337 



604 
10.941 



Department Public Instruction 



325 



High Schools — Cost of Maintenance 

Commissioned High Schools— 1916-1917 1917-1918 

Total current cost for year $3,842,201 37 

Total cost per pupil $58 37 

Certified High Schools — 

Total current cost for year 208,946 99 

Average cost per pupil $56 51 

Accredited and Unclassified High Schools — 

Total current cost for year 159,472 19 

Average cost per pupil $63 28 

Grand total for year _ $4,210,620 55 

Grand average cost per pupil $58 44 

HIGH SCHOOL INSPECTOR'S REPORT 

1915-1916 1916-1917 1917-1918 

Total schools inspected 422 424 312 

Schools having received first commission 48 40 20 

Schools having commission reissued 188 141 102 

Schools having commission renewed 66 61 3 

Schools haying commission continued 57 65 93 

Schools having commission revoked .. 2 10 

Total schools inspected for commissioned standing 359 309 228 

Schools having received first certificate. ., 9 5 11 

Schools having certificate reissued 19 29 20 

Schools having certificate renewed 7 29 1 

Schools having certificate continued 13 18 10 

Schools having certificate revoked 1 . . 6 

Total schools inspected for certified standing 49 81 48 

Schools accredited for one year . . 1 1 

Schools accredited for two years 8 11 8 

Schools accredited for three years 6 13 11 

Total schools inspected for accreditment. 14 25 20 

Total schools given no standing . . 9 16 



STATE TEACHERS' RETIREMENT FUND 

BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

B. F. Moore, Dean Indiana State Normal, Eastern Division, Muncie, 
Indiana, president. 

Richard Park, County Superintendent of Sullivan County Schools, 
Vice-President. 

Horace Ellis, State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Secretary. 

Otto L. Klauss, Auditor of State. 

Ele ^tansbury, Attorney-General. 



UNITS ESTABLISHED 

Cities 25 

State Institutions 3 

Counties 16 

Total 44 



32^ . Year Book 

condition of teachers' retirement fund july 31, 1918 

The Treasurer of State submits the following report to the trustees 
of the Teachers' Retirement Fund: 

Receipts 

Balance cash in depositories $168,839 82 

Interest on deposits 2,200 49 

Interest on coupons matured 9,495 93 

Securities matured 15,957 75 

Received from secretary 104,930 27 

$301,424 26 
Disbursements 
Securities purchased (by Uz McMurtrie, Treas- 
urer of State) $190,644 84 

Premium and interest accrued on securites 

purchased 1,497 73 

Secretary's warrants paid — 

(a) Withdrawals $10,502 07 

(b) Benefits 3,643 25 

(c) Annuities 67,556 52 

(d) Bert Morgan, clerk 2,441 63 

(e) Roxie Reese, stenographer 717 50 

(f ) B. F. Moore, traveling ex- 

pense 49 65 

(g) Richard Park, traveling 

expense 34 10 

(h) Printing 181 72 

(i ) Stamps 140 00 

(j) J. C. McCord, appraiser.. 13 55 

85,279 99— $277,472 56 

Balance in depository July 31, 1918 ^ $24,001 70 

Securities Account 

Total securities had and received $291,267 39 

Securites matured 15,957 75 

Total securities held July 31, 1918 $275,309 64 



Total resources July 31, 1918 $^9,311 34 

VOCATIONAL EDUCATION (1917-1918) 

The Indiana Vocational Education Law was enacted in 1913. Voca- 
tional education, as provided for by this law and as it is being developed 
by the State Board of Education, aims to give to the young people of 
the State vocational training which will fit them adequately for pro- 
ductive work in agriculture, in trades and industries, and in the busi- 
ness of home making. 



Department Public Instruction 827 

important provisions of the indiana vocational law 

1. Kinds of Vocational Education — 

(a) Industrial education shall mean that form of vocationaal educa- 

tion which fits for the trades, crafts, and wage-earning pur- 
suits, including the occupations of girls and women carried on 
in stores, workshops, and other establishments. 

(b) Agricultural education shall mean that form of vocational edu- 

cation which fits for the occupations connected with the tillage 
of the soil, the care of domestic animals, forestry, and other 
wage-earning or productive work on the farm. 

(c) Domestic science education shall mean that form of vocational 

education which fits for occupations connected with the house- 
hold. 

2. Types of Vocational Schools — 

(a) Vocational Schools. When so organized the work is in a build- 

ing not used for general school purposes. The school has a 
separate organization of courses, pupils, and teachers under 
its own director or head, who is under the direction of the 
local school authorities, and the State Board for Vocational 
Education. 

(b) Vocational Departments. When so organized the work is in a 

building used for other school purposes, but the work is or- 
ganized, established and maintained as a separate and inde- 
pendent department. 

3. Kinds of Vocational Classes — 

(a) All-day Classes. In all-day classes pupils over fourteen and 

under twenty-five years of age spend all day in class, labor- 
atory, and field work. 

(b) Part-time Classes. In part-time classes pupils devote a part of 

their time to profitable employment and receive in the part- 
time classes instruction complementary to the practical work 
carried on in such employment. The Federal Vocational Law 
provides for part-time trade preparatory and general con- 
tinuation classes. 

(c) Evening Classes. Instruction in the Evening Schools deals with 

the subject matter of the day - employment and must be so 
given as to relate to the day employment. Evening classes in 
home economies are open to all women over seventeen years of 
age employed in any capacity during the day. 

Each year since the passage of the Indiana Vocational Education 
Law, the number of approved vocational schools and classes has steadily 
increased and the quality of the vocational instruction has greatly im- 
proved. During 1917-1918 forty-five agricultural, thirty-four home 
economics, and twenty-eight trade and industrial schools were main- 
tained. 

The Vocational Division of the State Department of Education co- 
operates with local school authorities throughout the State in the or- 
ganization and promotion of vocational schools £^nd departments, and in 



328 Year Book 

the supervision of vocational instruction. All vocational work in In- 
diana is under the direction of the State Board for Vocational Education. 
The following tables show the kinds of vocational departments and 
schools maintaned during the school year 1917-1918, the special courses 
given, the number of pupils enrolled, the total cost of approved vocational 
instruction, and the amounts paid from local. State and Federal funds. 

VOCATIONAL HOME ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT. 

1917-1918 

Under the provisions of the State and Federal Vocational laws, vo- 
cational home economics classes provide instruction in home economics 
and related technical subjects for girls and women above fourteen years 
of age. Each year additional schools organize vocational work. The 
greatest increase in home economics was in the number of approved all- 
day vocational departments, which exactly doubled the past year.- 

The vocational course for high schools is four years in length and is 
equivalent in value to other high school courses. In addition to the work 
of the regular school year, all-day vocational pupils do supervised home 
project work during the vacation months. This vacation work is very 
valuable training, in that it affords pupils an opportunity to fix in their 
minds the principles learned at school, to form good habits, and to ac- 
quire skill. 

Special summer war emergency classes were organized for lessons in 
the conservation of foods and clothing. This work included both personal 
and community service. Reports of the work were entirely satisfactory. 

Notwithstanding the numerous demands caused by war conditions, 
evening classes for women were conducted in twenty-one cities and 
towns, with a total enrollment of six thousand two hundred (6,200) 
women. This part of our public school system is strictly vocational. 
Short unit courses were outlined and so planned that a limited number 
of lessons in each subject satisfied a specific need of a particular group. 

The successes achieved, with the number of requests on hand for 
vocational work in other communities, promise a decided increase in the 
amount of vocational work for the coming year. 

TRADES AND INDUSTRIES 

The work in Trades and Industries during the past year has shown 
a substantial increase in each of the three divisions — all-day, part-time 
and evening classes. 

On April 11, 1918, the State Board for Vocational Education unani- 
mously passed a resolution approving the granting of vocational diplomas 
to pupils in the commissioned high schools of the State who complete in 
a satisfactory manner a full four-year course of vocational instruction 
prescribed by the State Board for Vocational Education and approved 
by the Federal Vocational Board. 

As a result of this official action by the State Board for Vocational 
Education, pupils who graduate from a four-year course of approved 
vocational instruction are given the same recognition as graduates of 
other high school courses and are entitled to the official diploma as 
graduates of a commissioned high school. 



Department Public Instruction 329 

As a result of this recognition, the four-year vocational high school 
course is being taken by a larger number of high school students each 
year. This in part accounts for the increase in all-day vocational 
schools in trades and industries. 

The evening trade and industrial schools are becoming more and more 
vocationalized, especially in the industrial cities of the State. In this 
way the evening schools are meeting the needs of the industrial workers 
by offering short unit courses supplementing the daily work of men 
and -women engaged in industrial occupations. 

By far the most promising development at the present time in the 
department of trades and industries is the organization of part-time 
vocational classes for young industrial workers from 14 to 21 years of 
age. The boys and girls in this so-called emergency vocational group 
are of legal school age and therefore justly entitled to part-time in- 
struction provided by the public school authorities under the provisions 
of the State and Federal Vocational Laws. 

The great majority of the young people in this emergency vocational 
group have not completed the work of the elementary school and they 
are in great need of general continuation school instruction. Those 
who have chosen a definite occupation should be given trade extension 
instruction and those who have not chosen an occupation should be given 
trade preparatory instruction. Plans are now under way for extending 
this important work so well begun last year so that opportunity will be 
given for part-time instruction to the young industrial workers of legal 
school age in all of the industrial cities of the State. 

The training of conscripted men in evening schools for emergency 
war service work was an important part of the vocational program of 
the past year in the department of trades and industries. The following 
tabulataion shows the number of cities engaged in this work, the number 
of conscripted men enrolled and the number of sixty-minute hours of 
instruction: . 

beport on radio and buzzer classes 

Hours of 
Cities. Enrollment. Instruction. 

Anderson '. ,64 60 

Aurora , 20 50 

Bedford 45 58 

Evansville 104 183 

Ft. Wayne 16 164 

Greencastle 22 168 

Hammond 16 112 

Huntington ,. 54 . 160 

Indianapolis 26 184 

Lebanon 20 58 

Monticello 23 72 

Muncie 64 38 

Peru 14 63 

Princeton 14 60 

Richmond 55 96 

Seymour 18 159 

South Bend 22 90 

State Normal School 140 144 

Vincennes 22 125 

Wabash 24 90 



Totals, 20 cities 783 2,134 



330 



Year Book 



Following the recent State conference held in Indianapolis September 
11, 1918, for the purpose of promoting the training of conscripted men 
in evening schools for emergency war service work, the school author- 
ities in many of the large cities of the State have already organized 
classes, and the enrollment at this time indicates that the public schools 
of Indiana will do far more than their share in this patriotic educational 
work. 

Table No. 1 
Approved Vocational Courses in Home Economics 









Evening Classes 


Cities 


.a 
1 


I 


r' 


bC 




'S 


if 


i 


1 


J 






X 




X 
X 


X 


X 
X 




X 




X 
X 




6 






3 




X 


X 










2 




X 
X 
X 
















1 


5. Brookialle 






















1 


6. Columbia City... 


X 


X 




X 


X 
X 












5 


7. Columbus 












1 


8. Corydon 


X 


X 


















2 


9. Crawfordsville... 




X 
X 

X 




X 
X 
X 








X 
X 

X 




3 


10. Elkhart 














3 


11. Evansville 










X 




5 


12. Fwmount 


X 

X 
X 






1 


13. Fort Wayne. . . 


'x ■ 


X 


X 
X 
X 








X 








4 


14. Greensburg. . . . 














3 






X 




X 








3 


16. Hanover 


X 












1 






X 


X 
X 




X 
X 




X 




X 




6 


18. Kokomo 






2 


19. Lebanon 










X 




X 




2 


20. logansport 








X 




X 




2 


21. Mauckport 


X 
X 


X 

"x ■ 












2 


22. MonticpUo 




X 
















2 


23. Mt. Summit 
















T 


24 Muncie 






X 




X 








X 




3 


25. New Castle . 




X 










1 


26. Peru 






X 
X 
X 
X 
















1 


27. Portland 






X 







"x" 

X 
X 




X 
X 




X 
X 
X 
X 




5 


28. Richmond 






5 


29. South Bend .... 








3 


30. Terre Haute 




X 




3 


31. Veedersburg 




X 








1 


32. Vincennes. . 






X 
X 
X 








X 


X 


X 




4 


33. Wabash 




X 
X 






X 




3 


34. Warsaw 


X 




X 








4 


















Total 


10 


11 


3 


23 


3 


16 


1 


11 


1 


13 


2 


94 



Department Public Instruction 



881 



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I 



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o 

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' 


Anderson 

Aurora 

Bedford 

Brookville 

Columbus 

Crawfordsville 

Elkhart 

Evansville 

Ft. Wayne 

Greencastle 

Greensburg 

Huntington 

Indianapolis 


Kokomo 

Lebanon 

Logansport 

Monticello 

Muncie 

Peru 

Princeton 

Richmond 

Seymour 

South Bend 

State Normal 

Terre Haute 

Vincennes 

Wabash 


1 





332 Year Book 

vocational agriculture 

Vocational agricultural instruction is given in all-day and part-time 
classes to persons over fourteen and under twenty-five years of age, and 
in evening classes to persons over sixteen years of age. The work has 
developed until all parts of the State have been reached and until there 
is an ever increasing demand for the establishing of vocational schools 
and departments in new centers. 

The character of the work is such that it makes a strong appeal to 
progressive, energetic, capable boys and men. Fundamental principles 
of science are applied in most practical ways to the live stock, crop 
production, soil management and marketing problems with which farmers 
are constantly confronted. 

Vocational agricultural instruction as a part of the work of our 
public schools provides for the boy who expects to devote himself to t^^e 
occupation of food production and conservation an educational oppor- 
tunity equal to that provided for the boy who desires the kind of training 
that leads to one of the professions. Consequently the work is gaining 
favor in the high schools of the State, a fact that is clearly shown in 
the annual increase in the number of vocational centers, and in the 
rapid increase in the numbers enrolled in vocational classes. The work 
has developed until during the fiscal year covered by this report more 
than 60,000 young people in the State received instruction and direction 
in supervised practice on the farm. 



Department Public Instruction 



883 



Table No. 3 

Report of the State Board for Vocational Education Shovnng the Special and Total 

Amount.': of Reimbursement authorized for Approved Vocational Instruction, 

The Total and Departmental Enrollment of Pupils in Courses Approved 

for Reimbursement for the Year Beginning July J?, 1917 

and Ending June 30, 1918 



School 
Corporation 


Total 
No. 
Pupik 


Agriculture 


Trades and 
Industries 


Home Economics 


Salary of 
Vocational 
Directors 


Amount of 
Reimburse- 
ment 


No. 
Pupils 


Salary of 
Teachers 


No. 
Pupib 


Salary of 
i Teachers 


No. 
Pupils 


Salary of 
Teachers 


Anderson 


925 
57 
51 
175 

, 28 
17 
43 
156 
77 
42 
18 

119 
30 
17 
15 
21 

104 
1,198 
49 
1,347 
45 
24 
22 
81 

520 
45 
78 
3,321 
69 
85 
15 

215 
8 
12 
14 
35 
11 
93 
22 
17 

460 
15 
15 
11 
39 
53 
15 

103 
14 

376 

13 

66 

15 

1,116 

140 
16 

916 
18 
14 






632 

2C 


$5,098 39 
33 33 


293 
37 
33 

120 

28 


$918 66 
16 00 
777 78 
150 00 
150 00 


$1,666 67 


$7 683 72 


Aurora 






49 33 


BargersviUe 


18 


$977 77 




1 755 55 


55 


76 00 




126 00 


Bloomington 








150 00 


Brazil.. ...:;• 


17 


468 33 








468 33 


BfookviUe.. 


21 


150 00 


22 
138 
21 

22 


180 00 

1,031 00 

24 00 

516 67 




330 00 


Columbia City 


18 
21 
20 
18 
12 
30 
17 
15 
21 


366 67 
532 89 
450 00 
500 00 
498 33 
133 33 
219 90 
550 00 
383 33 




1 397 67 




35 


96 00 




652 89 


Corydon 




966 67 


Cowan 








500 00 


Crawfordsville 


23 


112 00 


84 


175 67 




786 00 






133 33 


Delphi 












219 90 


DePauw 












550 00 


Eaton 












383 33 


Elkhart 


22 
416 


62 00 
2,804 34 


82 
768 

18 
498 


155 00 

2,360 00 

480 00 

1,988 01 




217 00 


Evansville 

Fairmount. 


14 
31 


509 08 
1,183 33 


1,246 67 


J, 920 09 
T663 33 


Ft. Wayne 


849 


3,911 41 


1,633 33 


7,532 75 


Frankfort 


45 


343 21 


343 21 


Goshen 






24 


100 00 




100 00 


Greencastle. . . 






22 

14 

209 


112 00 
200 00 
432 02 




112 00 


Greensburg 

Hammond. ... . . 


12 


1,170 68 


55 
311 
10 
24 
1,908 
52 
50 


771 00 
1,067 93 

350 00 

137 50 

3,951 88 

69 33 

232 00 




2,141 68 


1,125 00 


2,624 95 




35 


636 12 


986 12 




54 

1,392 

17 

20 


336 00 

14,505 56 

53 33 

29 00 




473 50 


Indianapolis 

Kokomo 


21 


604 44 


1,800 00 


20,861 88 
122 66 




15 
15 


225 65 
523 75 




486 00 


Ligonier 




523 75 


Logansport 


131 


917 33 


84 


144 00 




1,061 33 


Loogootee 


8 
12 
14 
20 
11 
17 
22 
17 


526 67 
115 73 
711 11 
450 00 
479 17 
526 44 
794 17 
550 00 




526 67 














115 73 


Matthews 












711 11 








15 


550 00 




1,000 00 


Metz 








479 17 


Monticello 


23 


36 00 


53 


390 43 




952 87 


Mooresville 




794 17 














550 00 


Muncie 


323 


745 33 


137 


663 80 


1,063 33 


2,472 46 


New Carlisle 


15 
15 
11 
14 


666 67 

466 67 

625 00 

1,000 00 


666 67 














466 67 


Owensville 












625 00 


Pendleton 






25 
35 


150 00 
173 33 




1,150 00 


Peru 


18 


60 00 




233 33 


Pleasant Lake 


15 


400 00 




400 00 


Portland 






103 


278 00 




278 00 








14 

227 


46 67 
2,899 11 




46 67 


Richmond 


15 
13 
30 
15 
15 


300 00 
583 33 
900 00 
850 00 
1,200 00 


134 


334 00 




3,533 11 






583 33 


Seymour 

Shelbyville. . 


18 


106 00 


18 


100 00 




1,106 00 




850 00 


South Bend 

State Normal 


322 
140 


3,244 16 
574 00 


779 


1,323 02 


800 00 


6,567 18 
574 00 


Stockwell 


16 


533 33 








533 33 


Terre Haute.. 


345 


5,240 40 


571 


3,285 99 


1,400 00 


9.926 39 




18 
14 


366 67 
633 33 


366 62 


Veedersburg 












622^27 



334 



Year Book 

Table No. 3— Continued 



School 
Corporation 


Total 
No. 
Pupils 


Agriculture 


Trades and 
Industries 


Home Economics 


Salary of 
Vocational 
Directors 


Amount of 
Reimburse- 
ment 


No. 
Pupils 


Salary of 
Teachers 


No. 
Pupils 


Salary of 
Teachers 


No. 
Pupils 


Salary of 
Teachers 


Vevay 


!S 
295 

74 
153 

14 

18 
15 


18 


$213133 












$213 33 




108 
24 


11146 42 
60 00 


i87 
50 
127 


$533 56 

95 00 

495 00 


$1,133 33 


1,813 41 


Wabash, 






155 00 


Warsaw 


,26 

tv 14 

"18 
15 


366 67 
566 67 

1,022 22 
350 00 




861 67 


Waveland 








566 67 


(Wayne Co.) 
Wayne Twp 


. . 










1,022 22 


Wheatland 












350 00 
















Totals 


13,223 


813 


$25,462 23 


5,494 


$42,086 80 


6,916 


$24,018 66 


$11,868 33 


$103,436 02 



Pupils in All-day Vocational Agricultural classes continue their work throughout each month of 
the calendar year. 

In addition to the All -day classes vocational agricultural teachers give instruction in Evening and 
Part-time classes. No additional compensation is made for this work, nor is the work State or Fed- 
eral aided . 

In addition to the 813 pupils in All-day classes, vocational agricultural teachers had under their 
instruction during the year July 1, 1917, to June 30, 1918, 625 pupils in Evening classes and 700 in All- 
day classes, making a total of 2,138^in Vocational Agricultural classes. 



Department Public Instruction 



335 



Table No. 4 

Report of the State Board for Vocational Education for the Year Beginning July 1, 

1917 and Ending June 30, 1918, Showing the Enrollment of Pupils, Total 

Cost of Approved Vocational Instruction and the Amounts 

Paid from Local, State and Federal Funds 





School 


No. 


Total Cost 




Funds 




No. 


Corporations 


Pupils 


of Instruction 










Local 


State 


Federal 


1 


Anderson 


925 


$11,533 83 


$3 850 11 


$6 373 "09 


$1,310 63 
12 50 


?, 


Aurora 


57 
51 


74 00^ 
2,633 34 


24 67 

877 78 


36 83 
587 55 


3 


Bargersville 


1,168 00 


5 


Bedford 


175 


189 00 


63 00 


116 25 


9 75 


6 


Bloomington 

Brazil 


28 
17 
43 


225 00 
702 50 
495 00 


75 00 
234 17 
255 00 


150 00 
117 33 
262 50 




7 


3.51 66 


8 


Brookville 


67 50 


9 


Columbia City 


156 


2,096 50 


698 83 


497 67 


900 00 


10 


Columbus 


77 


979 33 


326 45 


210 89 


442 00 


11 


Corydon 


42 


1,450 00 


483 33 


629 67 


337 00 


1? 


Cowan. 


18 
119 


750 00 
1,179 00 


250 00 
393 00 


125 00 

780 75 


375 00 


13 


Crawfordsville .... 


5 25 


14 


Cumberland 

Delphi 


30 
17 
15 
21 
104 
1,198 


200 00 
329 85 
825 00 
575 00 
325 50 
10,416 45 


66 67 
109 95 
275 00 
191 67 
108 50 
3,496 36 


133 33 
219 90 
138 00 
96 33 
135 63 
6,453 90 




15 




16 


DePauw. 


412 00 


T7 


Eaton 


287 00 


18 


Elkhart. . . 


81 37 


19 


Evansville 


466 19 


20 


Fairmount 


49 


2,495 00 


831 67 


815 33 


848 00 


21 


Ft. Wayne 


1,347 


11,335 50 


3,802 74 


6,877 13 


655 63 


22 


Frankfort 


45 


514 82 


171 61 


101 21 


242 00 


?3 


Goshen 

Greencastle 


24 
22 


150 00 
168 00 


50 00 
56 00 


100 00 
70 00 




24 


42 00 


25 


Greensburg 


81 


3,212 50 


1,070 82 


1,200 83 


940 85 


26 


Hammond 


520 


3,937 43 


1,312 48 


1,886 47 


734 48 


?,7 


Hanover 


45 


1,479 17 


493 05 


541 12 


445 00 


2S 


Huntmy;ton 


78 


710 25 


236 75 


473 50 




29 


Indianapolis 


3,32J 


31,292 83 


10,430 95 


19,241 63 


1,620 25 .. 


30 


Kokomo 


69 


1S4 00 


01 34 


76 66 


46 00 


31 


Lebanon 


85 


729 00 


243 00 


38S 12 


97 88 


32 


Ligonier 


15 


785 63 


261 88 


79 75 


444 00 


33 


Lo.4;ansport 


215 


1,592 00 


530 67 


1,025 33 


36 00 


34 


Lnugootee 


8 


790 00 


263 33 


131 67 


395 00 


35 


^Vlartins'v-illft 


12 


173 60 


57 87 


115 73 




3() 


Matthews 


14 


1,066 00 


355 55 


178 11 


533 00 


37 


MauckporL 


35 


1,500 00 


500 00 


700 00 


300 00 


38 


Metz.. 


11 

93 


718 75 
1,429 30 


239 58 
476 43 


120 17 
540 37 


359 00 


39 


Monticello 


412 50 


40 


Mooresville 


22 


1,191 25 


397 03 


199 17 


595 00 


41 


Mf. Summit 


1/ 


825 00 


275 00 


140 00 


ilO 00 


42 


Muncie 


460 


3,708 m 


1,236 23 


787 15 


1,685 31 


43 


New Carlisle 


15 


1,000 00 


333 33 


166 67 


500 00 


44 


NoblesviUe 

OwensviUe 


15 
11 


700 00 
937 50 


233 3^ 
312 50 


466 67 
157 00 




45 


468 00 


46 


Pendleton 


39 


1,725 00 


575 00 


447 00 


703 00 


47 


Peru 


53 


350 00 


116 67 


210 83 


22 50 


48 


P'easant Lake 


15 


600 00 


200 00 


100 00 


300 00 


4q 


Portland 

Princeton 


103 

14 

?76 


417 00 

70 00 

5,299 66 


139.00 
23 33 

1,779 22 


278 00 

40 67 

3.302 69 




50 




51 


Richmond 


255 75 


5? 


Royerton 


13 
66 


875 00 
1,659 00 


291 67 
553 00 


146 33 
391 25 


437 00 


53 


Seymour 


714 75 


54 


Shelby ville 


15 


1,275 00 


425 00 


224 00 


626 00 


55 


South Bend 


1,116 


9,925 53 


3,358 35 


5,219 18 


1,348 00 


56 


State Normal 


140 


861 00 


287 00 


328 47 


245 53 


57 


Stockwell 


16 
916 


800 00 
14,889 59 


266 67 
4.963 20 


133 33 
7,672 09 


400 00 


58 


Terre Haute 


2,254 30 


59 


Tborntown 


18 


550 00 


183 33 


91 07 


275 00 


60 


Veedersbiirg 


14 


933 33 


311 11 


156 22 


465 00 


61 


Vevay 


18 


320 00 


106 67 


21.3 33 




62 


Vinuennes. . . 


295 


2,728 88 


913 47 


1.716 69 


36 72 


63 


Wabash 


74 


232 50 


^77 50 


125 00 


30 00 


64 


Warsaw 


153 
14 


1,292 50 
S50 00 


430 83 
283 33 


341 66 
148 67 


517 01 


65 


Waveland 


m 00 




(Wayne Co.; 












66 


Wayne Twp 


18 


1,533 33 


511 11 


356 22 


666 00 


67 


Wheatland 

Totals 


15 


525 00 


175 00 


90 00 


260 00 




13,223 


$155,316 50 


551,983 14 


$75,386 71 


S28,070 65 



336 



Year Book 



Table No. 5 

Report of the Indiana State Board for Vocational Education to the State Treasurer 

of Indiana, Custodian of the Federal Vocational Funds, Showing the Special and 

Total Amounts of Reimbursement Authorised from Each of the Federal 

Vocational Funds for Approved Vocational Instruction for the 

Year Beginning July 1, 1917 and Ending June 30, 1918 



No. 


Si Floor. CORl'OItATXONS 


Agriculture 


Home 
Economics 


Trades and 
Industries 


Teacher 
Training 


Total 


1 


Andprson 




$110 50 


SI, 200 13 
12 50 




$1,310 63 


2 


Aurora 




12 50 


3 


Bixraersvillc 

Bedford. 


.«66S 00 


500 00 


1,168 00 


4 


9 75 




9 75- 


5 


Brazil 


351 00 






351 00 


fi 


Brookville . . 


67 50 

025 00 

9 00 






67 50 


7 


Columbia Cify 


275 00 
397 00 
337 00 
375 00 






900 00 


- s 


rinliiTnhiis , , , 


36 00 




442 00 


9 


Corydon 




337 00 


in 










375 00 


n 


Crawfordsville 




5 25 




5 25 


T? 


DePauw 


412 00 
287 00 






412 00 


13 


Fat'>n 

Elkhart 








5!87 00 


H 


58 12 


23 25 
466 19 




81 37 


15 








466 19 


16 


Fairmounl . 

Ft. Wayne 


848 00 




848 00 


17 


317 50 


338 13 




655 63 


IS 


Frankfc-t 


242 00 


242 00 


IP 






42 00 
150 00 
616 00 




42 00 


20 


Grepnsburfi; 


790 85 




940 85 


?1 


Hammond 


118 48 


734 48 


22 


Hanover 


445 00 




445 00 


'>8 


Indiana State Rd. .'"or Voc. Ed . . . . 






?102 93 
1,450 38 
1,830 36 


102 93 


'>-1 


Indiana Normal Rf-hool 






245 63 


1,695 91 

1,830 36 

1,520 25 

46 00 


25' 


Indiana University 






'X^ 




453 00 




1,167 25 
i?0 00 
[10 88 


V 




26 00 
87 00 


'^8 


Lebanon 






97 88 


29 


Ligonicr 


441 00 

"39500 
533 00 
300 00 
359 00 
390 00 
595 00 
410 00 




444 00 


PO 


Lcgansport 

Loogootee 

Matthows 




36 00 




36 00 


31 




395 00 


'■i'> 








533 00 


38 


Mauckport 








800 00 


34 


Mp.ti 








359 00 


35 
36 


MoDticello 

Mooresville 


9 00 


13 50 




412 50 
595 00 


37 








410 00 


38 




248 93 


1,436 38 




1,685 31 


30 


New Carlisle 

Owen«ville 


500 00 
468 00 
703 00 




500 00 


40 








468 00 


41 








703 00 


42 


Peru . . 




[22 50 




22 50 


43 
44 


Pleasant Lake 

Purdue University 


300 00 




"3,'666'99" 


300 00 
3 660 99 


45 






120 25 


135 50 


255 75 


46 




437 00 
675 00 
626 00 


437 00 


47 


Seymour 

Shelbyville 

South Bend 




39 75 




714 75 


48 






626 00 


49 




1,318 00 




1 348 00 


50 


Stockwell. 


400 00 




400 00 


51 


Terre Haute 


157 80 


2,096 50 




2.254 30 


52 


Thorntown 

Veedersbiirp: 


275 00 
466 00 




275 00 


53 


"' 756' 
242 01 


06 72 
i 22 50 




562 72 


54 


Wabash...: 




'30 00 


55 


Warsw. . 


ik 275 00 
418 00 
666 00 
200 00 




517 01 


5r 


Wavelacd 

CWayne Co.) Wavne Twp 

Wheatland 






418 00 


57 








666 00 


58 








260 00 




Total 












$15,775 85 


112,704 59 


59,590 21 


$7,044 66 • 


$35,115 31 - 



Department Public Instruction 337 

THE administration OF THE SMITH-HUGHES ACT IN INDIANA DURING THE 

YEAR 1917-1918 

Plans for the promotion of Vocational Education in Indiana, under 
the provisions of the State and Federal Vocational Education laws, 
were prepared by the State Vocational Department, under the direction 
of the State Board for Vocational Education, and approved by the 
Federal Vocational Board. These plans, together with the State and 
Federal Vocational laws and certain important rules and regulations of 
the State and Federal Vocational Boards, were published early in 1918 
and furnished to the school authorities throughout the State. 

Special conferences were held during the year by the State Voca- 
tional Director and his assistants with local school authorities interested 
in the organization and promotion of special lines of vocational work in 
their communities. 

A special State Vocational Conference was held in Indianapolis on 
February 9, 1918. Dr. C. A. Prosser, Federal Vocational Director, pre- 
sented to the school authorities of Indiana the necessity and the ways 
and means of promoting the state program for training conscripted men 
in day and evening classes for emergency war training work. As a re- 
sult of this conference day schools for training conscripted men were 
established by Purdue University and the Indianapolis Chamber of Com- 
merce, and evening schools were organized for training conscripted men 
as radio and buzzer operators in twenty-five cities in the State. 

A special State Vocational Conference was held in Indianapolis on 
September 11, 1918, for the purpose of promoting the organization of 
vocational classes for the training of conscripted men in evening schools 
for emergency war service work. 

The meeting was held under the joint auspices of the State Council of 
Defense and the State Board for Vocational Education. Dr. Horace 
Ellis, State Superintendent of Public Instruction, spoke briefly concern- 
ing the war work of the Indiana schools and colleges, during the past 
year, and pledged to the Federal Government the enthusiastic support 
of the educational forces of the State. 

Mr. James P. Munroe, member of the Federal Vocational Board, 
presented the program to be carried out by the public schools and col- 
leges of the State in response to the call of the Federal Government for 
immediate help in the training of conscripted men in evening classes for 
the various lines of emergnecy war service work. 

Mr. Laubach, Professor of Vocational Education in the State Normal 
School, explain briefly the methods which he had found most effective 
in the organization and promotion of the large radio and buzzer school 
under his direction. 

President W. L. Bryan, for the State Board for Vocational Educa- 
tion, and Mr. Frank Duffy, for the Vocational Committee of the State 
Board, spoke briefly in approval of the program presented by Mr. Mun- 
roe, and pledged the hearty support of the State Board in its promotion. 

The organization of this work is proceeding in a very satisfactory 
manner, and approximately 1,500 conscripted men are now enrolled in 
evening classes for war service training. 

22—18966 



338 



Year Book 



Vocational teacher training classes provided for under the Smith- 
Hughes Act, and in accordance with the approved plans of the State 
and Federal Boards for Vocational Education, were maintained during 
the year at the Indiana State Normal School, Indiana University, and 
Purdue University. Two hundred seventy-two teachers were enrolled 
in these classes and an excellent beginning was made in the necessary 
and important work of providing vocational teachers qualified to teach 
in vocational schools of departments. 



WORK UNDER WAY OR CONTEMPLATED 

All of the work in agriculture extends throughout the calendar year. 
Boys who are enrolled in the four year vocational agricultural course in 
all-day classes in high school continue throughout the summer their 
farm practice work under the supervision of the vocational teacher. 
All-day classes are being organized in new centers in larger numbers 
annually, and part-time classes for boys and young men not enrolled in 
all-day classes are materially increased from year to year. 

The demand for work in home economics throughout the calendar 
year is growing stronger each year, especially in rural communities. In 
response to this demand, home economics teachers are employed for the 
full calendar year wherever justified by a real need of supervised home 
practice work in connection with the fundamental problems of the house- 
hold. 

Part-time classes in trades and industries are maintained throughout 
the calendar year in a majority of the ten cities in which vocational di- 
rectors are employed. Under approval of the State Board for Vocational 
Education, several of the ten vocational directors employed by cities are 
assisting the State Vocational Director in the promotion throughout the 
State of part-time vocational classes for young workers from 14 to 25 
years of age and evening classes for conscripted men in war service 
training. 

The steady growth of approved vocational schools in Indiana, since the 
passage of the State Vocational Education Law, is shown by the following table: 

ANNUAL REPORTS OF APPROVED VOCATIONAL SCHOOLS 



Years 


Trades and 
Industry 


Home 
Economics 


Agriculture 


Total 


Gain 


1Q14-15 


9 
11 
19 

28 


18 
23 
30 
36 


7 
14 
22 
48 


34 
48 
71 
112 




1915-16 . 


14 


1916-17 


23 


1917-18 . . 


41 






Total 


67 


107 


91 


265 









COST OF ADMINISTERING VOCATIONAL EDUCATION IN INDIANA — 1917-18 

J. G. Collicott, salary $6,000 00 

Z. M. Smith, salary 3,270 80 

Bertha Latta, salary 1,800 00 

Glenn Anderson, stenographer 1,000 00 

Maggie Thompson, stenographer 732 42 

J. G. Collicott, traveling expenses 622 99 

Z. M. Smith, traveling expenses 533 84 

Bertha Latta, traveling expenses 305 24 



Department Public Instruction 339 

Special assistants: 

(a) Bertha Ferrell $195 00 

(b) Marie Conover 531 00 

(c) Zola Shirk Sholty 282 50 

(d) Extra 52 02 

Vocational Committee, traveling expenses — 

W. E. Stone *. 73 36 

C. O. Williams 130 29 

Frank Duffy 

A. M. Hall 68 34 

Postage 700 00 

Expressage v * ^ ^^ 

Total $16,303 84 

CONDENSED STATEMENT OF FACTS RELATING TO THE MANUSCRIPT DEPART- 
MENT OF THE OFFICE OF THE STATE SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC 
INSTRUCTION, JANUARY 1, 1918 TO DECEMBER 31, 1918 

Manuscript fees — 

January examination $1,509 50 

March examination 1,898 75 

April examination , 1,591 50 

May examination ^ , 1,536 00 

June examination 1,960 75 

July examination 1,515 00 

August examination 806 25 

October examination 655 75 

Duplicate licenses issued 3 00 

Total fees received $11,476 50 

Total disbursements 7,259 70 

Total balance $4,216 80 

Amount paid to the Treasurer of State, $4,216.80. 

An itemized report covering the receipts and disbursements of this 
department is filed annually with the Governor on the 31st of December. 

Receipts covering all disbursements are placed on file in the office of 
the Auditor of State. 



340 



Year Book 



ENROLLMENT AND AVERAGE DAILY ATTENDANCE 



CoUNttES 


Mate 


Female 


Total E!e^ 

mentary 

and High 

Schools 


Average Daily Attendance 


White 


Colored 


White 


Colored 


Elementary 


High 
Schools 


Adama . > i 


2,341 
7,376 
2,468 
1,260 
1,530 

2,730 
960 
1,735 
1,406 
2,408 

3,289 
2,912 
1,464 
2,933 

1,789 

1,898 
2,585 
5,572 
1,933 
, 5,154 

1,475 
2,287 
2,187 
1,337 
1,934 

3,305 
5,009 
4,614 
2,746 
1,757 

2,133 
2,163 
3,362 
4,120 
3,228 

2,592 
1,647 
2,744 
1,886 
1,464 

2,124 
5,027 
3,296 
1,738 
11,026 

4,038 
3,562 
6,693 
24,289 
2,842 

1,332 

2,798 
2,787 
3,064 
2,260 

1,354 
2,308 
339 
1,936 
1 518 


'""92" 
19 
6 

6 

"2i" 
203 

30 
9 

'"24" 
13 

2 

9 

167 

....... 

47 

135 

2 

140 

151 

10 

28 

7 

24 
12 
15 

58 

''I 

7 

r4i 
35 

48 
. 52 

2 

2 
364 

16 
14 
75 

481 

7 

2 
19 
56 
37 

9 

■"io" 

17 
9 


2,247 
7,135 
2,356 
1,316 
1,636 

2,536 
914 
1,828 
3,495 
2,526 

3,321 

2,875 
1,380 
2,882 
1,822 

1,876 
2,588 
5,730 
1,906 
14,985 

1,550 
2,227 
2,270 
1,339 
1,929 

3,186 
5,169 
4,657 
2,652 
1,806 

2,054 
2,241 
3,353 
4,108 
3,148 

2,537 
1,608 
2,498 
1,829 
1,481 

2,110 
5,098 
3,051 
1,679 
10,693 

4,072 
3,537 
6,684 
24,307 
2,779 

1,251 
2,856 
2,810 
3,058 
2,322 

1,352 
2,201 
359 
1,950 
1,476 


"m 

26 

7 

11 

'23" 
266 

46 
5 

■"25" 
14 

7 

8 

197 

....... 

42 

164 

....... 

145 

191 

9 

26 

7 

35 
6 
33 
71 

12 
2 

14 
59 
42 

43 
50 

"362" 

8 

26 

95 

381 

7 

1 

9 

53 
19 

5 

■■'io' 

23 
10 


4,588 
14,710 
4,869 
2,589 
3,166 

5,283 
1,874 
3,563 
6,945 
5,403 

6,686 
5,801 
2,844 
5,864 
3,688 

3,783 
5,190 

11,666 
3,839 

10, 162 

3,114 
4,813 
4,459 
2,677 
3,863 

6,776 
10,520 
9,290 
5,452 
3,577 

r4,246 
4,422 
6,763 
8,357 

[6,376 

5,156 
3,259 
5,263 
[3,815 
3,022 

4,325 
10,227 
6,349 
3,419 
22,445 

8,134 
7,139 
13,547 
49,458 
5,635 

2,586 
5,682 
5,706 
6,178 
4,596 

2,706 
4,509 
718 
3,926 
3.013 


3,687.9 
10,628.0 
3,228.6 
1,555.9 
2» 097.0 

3,817.4 
1,171.0 
2,517.0 
5,066.0 
3,678.0 

4,729.0 
4,040.0 
1,820.0 
4,189.0 
2,3611 

2,448.4 
3,806.0 
7,405.0 
3,079.0 
7,504.0 

2,139.0 
3,849.0 
2,840.0 
2,005.5 
2,418.3 

5,060.0 
7,656.0 
721 
3,834.0 
2,331.0 

2,941.0 
3,210.0 
685.9 
5.989.7 
4.053.0 

3,395.3 
2,108.3 
3,549.7 
2.560.0 
2,019.0 

3,088.0 
7,048.0 
4,448.0 
2,452.0 
15,294.0 

494.0 

5,583.0 

9,205.0 

293,875.0 

3,833.1 

614.0 
4,294.1 
4,017.0 
4,168.0 
3,308.0 

2,182.0 
3,028.5 
466.0 
2,719.4 
2,100.0 


447 6 


Allen . 


1,119.0 


Baftholofiiew 


554.0 


ietttdli . . 


358.3 


Blackford 


§69.0 




670.0 


Brown 


106.0 


Carroll ■. 


613.0 


Cass 


930.0 


Clark 

Clav ... V . 


417.0 
675.0 


Cunton 


805.0 
148.0 


SDaviesS ... 


571.0 


feearboth 


328. g 


Decatur 


466.7 


Dekalb 


682.0 




1,554.0 


Dubois 


307.0 


Elkhart 


1,316.0 


Fayette 


397.0 


Floyd 


444.0 




482.0 


Franklin 


152.0 


Fulton 


611.4 


Gibson . . 


733.0 


Grant 


1,135.0 




517.0 


Hamilton 


850.6 


Hancock 


505.0 


Harrison 


490.0 


Hendricks . . 


785.0 




149.0 


Howard .... 


787.4 




1,175.0 


Jackson 


558.9 


Jasper 


350.1 


Jay 


568.4 


Jefferson. . . 


374.0 




336.0 


Johnson 


732.8 


Knox •. . . 


1,010.0 


Kosciusko 


825.0 




464.0 


Lake 


2,005.0 


Laporte 


879.0 
974.0 


Madison 

Marion 

Marshall 

Martin . . . 


1,422.0 

5,363.9 

703.9 

50.0 




772.9 


Monroe . 


515.0 


Montgomery 

Morgan .... 


1,050.0 
587.0 


Newton 

Noble 

Ohio 

Orange 

Owen 


325.0 
652.0 
64.0 
345.3 
305,0 



Department Public instruction 
ENR OLLMENT — Continued 



341 



Counties 



Male 



White Colored 



Female 



White Colored 



Total Ele- 
mentary 

and High 
Schools 



Average Daily Attendance 



Elementary 



High 
Schools 



Perry 

Pike 

Porter 

Posey 

Pulaski 

Putnam 

Randolph. . . 

Ripley 

Rush 

Scott 

Shelby 

Spencer 

Starke 

Steuben 

St. Joseph. . 
Sullivan .... 
Switzerland . 
Tippecanoe. . 
Tipton 

Union 

Vanderburgh 
Vermillion.. . 
Vigo 

Wabash 

Warren 

Warrick 

Washington . 

Wayne 

Wells 

White 

Whitley 

Totals. . 



2,109 
1,647 
2,225 
2,101 
1,845 

1,554 
2,222 
3,090 
1,808 
1,967 

1,022 
2,681 
1,971 
1,421 
1,476 

8,028 
3,943 
1,029 
3,514 
1,797 

684 
6,824 
3,061 
9,814 

2,752 
,052 
,527 



403 



11 
519 

28 
422 

11 

"58' 



160 



2,201 
1,619 
2,243 
2,110 
1,874 

^1,510 
2,221 
3,094 
1,851 
1,860 

1,046 
2,638 
1,957 
1,329 
1,432 

8,038 
4,002 
1,029 
3,539 
1,725 

642 
6,853 
3,282 
9,811 

2,777 
1,051 
2,468 
1,949 

3,945 
2,275 
2,012 
1,784 



77 



35 



112 
13 

2 
47 



12 
635 

25 
453 

14 

■■57' 



211 



4,328 
3,286 
4,484 
4,212 
3,880 

3,064 
4,477 
6,219 
3,659 
3,906 



5,418 
4,069 
2,753 
2,908 

16,274 
7,965 
2,061 
7,139 
3,522 

1,349 
14,831 

6,396 
20,500 

5,554 
2,103 
5,110 
3,937 

8,405 
4,678 
3,994 
3,622 



278,528 



4,203 



276, 808 



4,613 



564, 152 



3,159.0 
2,305.0 
2,981.0 
2,982.0 
2,596.8 

2,333.0 
3,130.6 
4,244.0 
2,708 
192.0 

1,429.0 
3,924.0 
2,762.0 
1,766.5 
2,090.4 

11,613.0 
5,363.0 
1,410.6 
4,583.5 
2,603.0 

857.7 
94,520.0 
4,731.0 
14,199.0 

3,892.5 
1,550.0 
3,978.8 
2,478.0 

6.479.0 
3,303.0 
2,709.0 
2,560.9 

7,823.8 



447.0 
238.0 
346.0 
467.0 



344.0 
701.0 
873.0 
345.0 
46.0 

156.0 
614.0 
356.0 
256.0 
515.0 

1,449.0 
862. C 
191.5 

1,105.9 
405.0 

204.9 
1,297.6 

479.0 
1,790.0 

721.3 
184.0 
501.5 
460.0 

1,145.0 
576.0 
514.0 
483.9 



687.5 



342 



Year Book 



ENROLLMENT — Continued. 







Jl 




Enrolhnent in Pri- 
vate and Parochial 
Schools 


Number of High Schools 


PI 

d03 3 


li 


COTTNTIBS 


f 


-s 


5I 




399 
1.281 
631 
413 
432 

735 
89 
587 
999 
441 

698 
893 
181 
556 
337 

470 
724 

1,463 
305 

1,437 

387 
485 
652 
104 
644 

801 
1,291 
802 
984 
536 

147 
855 

1,170 
927 

1,284 

597 
375 
642 
305 
151 

I m 
733 

1,118 
916 
412 

2,300 

1,032 

762 

1,644 

6,203 

749 

149 
697 
632 
1,089 
630 

345 
753 
79 
392 
222 


114 


« 


207 

5,864 

280 

448 


4 
6 
4 

1 

6 

1 
7 
10 
3 

4 
9 
4 
5 
3 

7 
7 
10 
5 
8 

4 
3 
8 
1 

4 

9 
10 
8 
8 
8 

1 

11 
11 
5 
9 

7 
4 
7 
2 
2 

7 
12 
13 
7 
9 

9 
7 
7 
15 
8 

2 
7 
4 
9 
6 

4 
9 
1 
4 
2 


3 


1 


■ "5" 

7 
9 
1 


57 


Allen 


128 




"sq" 


30 


....^.. 


2 


43 


Benton. 


28 


Blackford 


32 




"56" 
48 


19 


36 


2 


5 


74 




68 


Carroll 


47 


""756" 
318 


2 


8 

10 

1 

5 
10 

""2" 

6 
2 
15 
4 
5 

5 
1 

8 
2 
9 

9 
5 
3 

7 
10 

2 
13 

10 

8 


43 


Cass 


62 


Clark 


107 

95 

29 

"■56" 

40 

"36 " 

31 




2 

3 
1 

""2" 

2 
....... 

1 
2 


....... 

2 
2 

. 


70 


Clay 


71 








48 


Crawford 


5 

35 
23 

27 
32 
36 
9 
21 

23 




78 


Daviess 


""448" 
105 


88 




86 


Decatur . . 


30 


Dekalb 


74 


Delaware 




21 


Dubois 


104 
366 

160 


84 


Elkhart 


92 


Fayette. . 


18 


Floyd 


39 


Fountain 


"24" 
98 

71 


12 

47 




....... 

4 
2 




26 


Franklin . . , 




50 


Fulton 




23 


Gibson 


15 


311 

200 

100 

34 

32 

194 


79 


Grant 


81 


Greene 


204 




5 




87 




34 




282 

"59" 
152 

35 
13 

"m" 

135 


57 

12 
13 
25 

34 
30 
12 
21 
100 


7 

""2" 
2 

1 
1 

""3" 
4 




33 


Harrison 


140 




28 


Henry . 




24 


Howard 


364 
420 

613 
108 
83 


29 


HlintipgtoTi 


83 


Jackson 


2 
5 


" "3" 
3 
4 
3 


66 




64 


Jay 


75 




67 


Jennings . . 




70 






8 


Knox 


"67" 
22 

"85" 


40 

8 

73 

49 

55 




""2" 
2 


3 
1 
4 
5 

4 


25 
16 
10 
25 

""9" 
7 
15 
9 


56 


Kosciusko 




48 




1 
8,155 

1,661 
158 
469 

5,551 
82 


50 


Lake.. ::::::: .■■■ 


17 




62 


Lawrence . 


90 




90 


Marion 


22 
37 

27 
134 

"ioe" 

23 


56 
25 


1 
1 

1 
3 

""3" 

1 


2 
1 


10 


Marshall 


79 


Martin... 


90 


Miami 


31 
13 

"'29" 

17 


330 


2 

1 

1 


12 

4 
15 

9 

....... 


51 


Monroe 


94 


Montgomery 


88 


32 


Morgan 


72 


Newton 


85 
89 

7 


51 


Noble 


55 


Ohio 










20 


Orange 










■1 
6 


89 


Owen 


67 


76 




2 


2 


77 



Department Public Instruction 
ENROLLMENT— Continued. 



343 





1% 

.a" 
III 






*1 

a § 

III 


Number of High Schools 


No. of Consolidated 
Schools with Four 
or more Teachers 


Is 


Counties 


.1 


1 


5?; 


Parke 


420 
119 
299 
512 
568 

320 
629 
1,020 
328 
440 

164 
638 
378 
286 
488 

1,730 
743 
130 

1,280 
460 

168 
1,492 

510 
2,165 

829 
169 
356 
410 

1,292 
615 
622 
529 


93 
146 
123 

14 

■■■36" 
96 

"46" 
"'48" 

"i27" 
84 
13 






7 
3 
3 

8 

7 

5 
6 
17 
5 
6 

2 
6 
5 
6 
8 

5 
6 
1 
11 
5 

2 
2 
4 
11 

12 
3 
3 
3 

12 

7 
8 
7 


2 
7 
4 

1 

....... 

....... 

2 

■■■■-■ 

1 
1 

""3" 
2 




8 


58 


Perry 


■"5" 
26 
18 

16 
115 
30 
25 
56 

29 
72 
9 
19 
11 

69 
127 


334 


98 


Pike 


1 
2 

1 

1 
7 
1 
2 
3 

1 
4 

....... 

2 
4 


1 
1 

3 
10 
19 

1 
9 

2 
9 
5 
4 
6 

2 
5 


85 


Porter 


236 
141 

77 


57 


Posey 


59 


Pulaski 


55 


Putnam 


71 


Randolph 7 


72" 

183 


17 


Ripley 


86 


Rush 


14 


Scott 




32 


Shelby 


208 
26 


62 


Spencer 


86 


Starke 


39 


Steuben 




54 


St. Joseph 


4,000 
32 


91 


Sullivan 


77 


Switzerland 


70 








1 
1 

6 


12 
5 


29 


Tipton. . . . 


9 
64 




43 






20 




73 

265 


40 


Vfirmillinn 


30 
67 


72 


1 
1 


1 


8 
10 

15 
5 

1 

7 

""5" 
5 


20 


Vigo 


65 


Wabash 




245 


25 


Warren . . 


29 
177 
76 


17 

9 

56 

24 
31 


. 1 
5 

2 


1 
1 
6 

2 
2 


59 


Warrick ; 




105 


Washington 




110 


Wayne... . 


695 


36 


Wells 


78 


White . . 


54 
15 


58 


Whitley 




48 




2 


63 






Totals 


71,856 


3,717 


2,122 


34,877 


572 


114 


129 


528 


5,396 







844 



Year Book 



AVERAGE WAGES PER DAT 





ll 


Principals 


1 


ll 
ll 


g 

ii 

ea c4 O 


1.2 


11 




Counties 




1 




$3 93 
9 13 

3 75 

4 41 
4 56 

4 23 

2 25 

3 46 
6 08 

5 00 

4 33 
4 87 

3 39 

4 45 

3 38 

4 96 

3 61 

4 36 

3 79 

4 48 

5 51 

6 22 
4 03 
4 58 
4 38 

4 03 
4 48 
4 13 
4 96 

3 96 

4 38 

2 60 
4 23 

4 40 

5 39 

4 46 
4 22 

3 53 
3 75 
3 75 

3 89 

4 64 
3 87 

3 41 

4 56 

5 98 

3 83 

4 80 
4 82 

3 74 

4 30 
4 41 
4 38 

3 93 

4 92 

4 21 
3 83 
3 75 

3 75 

4 15 


$5 39 
7 27 

5 90 

6 46 

5 71 

6 58 

4 70 

5 39 

7 70 

5 75 

6 45 
6 66 

3 93 
6 16 

5 80 

6 17 
5 16 

7 91 

5 19 

6 34 

6 43 
6 25 

5 29 

4 94 

■ 7 28 

6 00 
6 12 

5 31 

6 23 
6 17 

4 70 
6 51 

5 49 

8 19 
5 28 

5 68 
5 39 
5 65 
5 00 
5 30 

5 64 

6 82 

6 10 
5 47 

7 06 

8 26 

5 88 

6 70 

9 53 

5 25 

4 75 

6 27 

6 63 

7 94 

5 65 

4 89 

6 22 
4 16 

4 74 

5 30 


$4 40 
7 94 
4 55 

7 00 
4 03 

4 58 

"3'84'" 
4 65 
4 50 

4 10 

5 41 

■■4'53" 

4 57 

5 19 

4 22 

5 43 

""4'95" 

5 41 

4 56 
3 51 
3 76 

3 89 

4 13 

5 73 
4 34 
4 08 
4 11 

3 82 

4 97 

3 96 

4 89 

5 61 

3 19 

3 78 

4 23 
4 30 

3 86 

6 06 

4 31 
3 50 

5 35 

5 11 

3 27 

4 17 

8 94 
4 50 

"i'lb" 
4 54 
4 25 
4 91 

"i'u" 

"4'25" 
3 94 


$4 26 

6 90 
4 27 
4 32 
4 36 

4 57 

3 54 

4 53 
4 88 
4 35 

4 79 
4 28 

2 04 
4 38 
4 12 

4 22 
4 21 
4*25 

3 74 

4 62 

5 63 
4 37 
4 11 

3 49 

4 72 

4 28 
4 18 

3 94 

4 23 
4 35 

3 66 

4 20 
4 25 
4 51 
4 55 

4 09 
4 09 
4 55 
3 93 
3 31 

3 95 

4 66 

4 27 
' 3 91 

5 58 

4 59 
4 18 
4 66 

7 04 
4 18 

3 94 

4 30 
4 50 
4 89 

3 71 

4 33 
4 53 
3 87 
3 79 
3 82 


$3 30 
4 22 
3 09 
3 24 
3 26 

3 24 

2 67 

3 23 
3 54 
3 29 

2 58 

3 44 
3 05 
3 10 
3 20 

3 55 
3 11 
3 53 

2 96 

3 23 

3 79 

2 91 

3 03 
3 44 
3 08 

3 33 
3 19 
3 03 
3 21 
3 31 

3 17 
3 45 
3 42 
3 25 
3 12 

3 20 
3 68 
3 43 
3 52 
3 20 

3 40 

2 90 

3 53 

3 12 

4 23 

3 53 
3 36 

3 58 

4 97 

2 99 

3 01 
3 27 
3 63 
3 42 
3 00 

3 71 
3 07 

2 91 

3 42 
3 20 


3 14 


$2 95 
4 87 

2 89 

3 25 
3 06 

2 94 


6 
1 


$194,500 00 


Allen 


20,000 00 


Bartholomew 




Benton . . 


1 


17 541 00 


Blackford 




Boone 


1 


13,000 00 


Brown 




Carroll 


3 46 
3 39 

"zii" 


2 85 
2 82 
2 90 

2 70 

3 28 


3 


32,000 00 


Cass 




Clark 






Clay . 






Clinton 






Crawford 


1 
1 


1,600 00 




3 63 

3 75 
3 38 
3 56 

2 98 

3 42 

4 32 

2 71 

3 16 
3 63 
3 68 

3 33 
3 45 
3 16 
3 30 
3 20 

■'3'62'" 
3 41 
3 43 


2 60 

2 72 

2 97 
2 68 
2 92 

2 69 

3 12 

3 19 
2 81 

2 97 

3 00 
2 93 

2 71 

3 39 
2 65 

2 95 

3 26 

2 69 
2 92 
2 81 
2 87 


32,000 00 












Dekalb 






Delaware 


1 
2 


8,000 00 
2,985 00 


Elkhart 




Fayette 






Floyd 












Franklin 






Fulton 


2 

1 
3 


44,000 00 


Gibson 


2,300 00 


Grant 


215,000 00 






Hamilton 

Hancock 


1 
1 


8,000 00 
46,000 00 


Hendricks 






Henry 


3 


47,000 00 






Huntington 


2 

2 
2 


204 500 00 


■■3'4i' 
3 34 

2 90^ 

3 14 

2 93 

3 31 
3 43 


2 78 

3 21 
3 00 
2 60 
2 55 

2 79 

2 49 

3 02 
2 70 


5,81150 


Jasper. . . . 


32,000 00 


Jay 










Jennings 

Johnson 










Knox 


1 
1 


4,431 87 


Kosciusko 

tfr' 


13,500 00 


6 

2 
4 
1 
11 
5 

1 
4 

i 

2 
2 


9,530 02 


Laporte 


"z'bb" 

3 19 

■■3'24" 
3 03 

"'3'22" 
"3'97" 


2 93 

2 73 

3 51 
2 93 
2 73 

2 67 

3 06 

2 68 

3 29 
3 20 

3 10 
2 60 
2 66 
2 96 
2 68 


83,000 00 


Lawrence 

Madison 


86,062 00 
60,000 00 
154,000 00 


Marshall 

Martin 


126,000 00 
1,500 00 




99,000 00 


Monroe 


2.852 00 


Montgomery 

Morgan 


60,000 00 
31,690 00 


Newton 

Noble.. 


50,500 00 


Ohio 






Orange 

Owen 


4 

1 


5,864 42 
1,000 00 



Department Public Instruction 

AVERAGE WAGES PER DAY — Continued 



845 



CODNTLBS 



.S.2 



Principals 



^1 



<u-C3 O 






ll 

1.3 



88 



Parke. 
Perry. 
Pike.. 
Porter. 
Posey. 



Pulaski... 
Putnam. . 
Randolph . 
Ripley . . . 
Rush.... 



Scott... 
Shelby.. 
Spencer. 
Starke. . 
Steuben. 



St. Joseph. . 
Sullivan — 
Switzerland . 
Tippecanoe . 
Tipton 



Union 

Vanderburgh. 
Vermillion.. . 
Vigo 



Wabash 

Warren . 

Warrick 

Washington. 

Wayne 



White... 
Whitley. 



Averages. 
Totals... 



$3 89 
4 18 

3 52 

4 27 

3 95 

4 24 
3 45 

3 25 

4 44 
4 39 

3 25 

4 53 

4 03 
3 75 
3 43 

5 90 

3 98 

2 31 
9 69 

4 27 

3 00 

5 42 

4 25 
4 39 

4 40 

3 71 

4 12 
4 33 

4 87 
4 56 
4 99 
4 73 



$4 32 



$6 14 

4 67 

5 21 
5 96 
5 57 

5 91 
5 64 
5 75 

4 19 

5 85 

4 75 

5 88 
4 57 

4 74 

5 36 

7 20 
5164 
4 31 

4 48 

6 40 

5'00 
lOIOO 

7 20 
7_20 

6 24 

3 01 

5 48 

4 67 

7 92 

5 87 
5 84 
5 66 



S5 89 



$3 89 



5 41 

3 92 

4 50 
4 50 
4 12 



3 93 

3 83 

4 53 

3 76 

4 06 



7 00 
4 62 



4 25 



4 31 
4 69 



3 84 



4 58 
4 50 



5 00 
4 59 



$4 58 



$4 06^ 

4 20 

3 88 

5 07 

4 47 

4 11 
4 54 
4 40 

3 87 

4 75 

4 25 

5 02 
3 85 
3 11 

3 90 

6 09 

4 48 
4 27 
4 35 
4 81 

4 12 

4 42 

5 00 
4 75 



$4 35 



$3 08 
2 91 



3 23 
3 43 
3 19 



3 58 
3 20 
3 28 
3 34 
3 18 



3 74 
3 81 
3 36 

3 61 
3 18 
3 25 
3 00 

3 89 
3 37 

3 40 

4 02 



S3 31 



$3 10 



3 38 
3 49 



3 49 
■422" 



2 97 

3 27 
2 82 

2 98 

3 28 



39 



3 69 
3 37 



4 00 
3 12 



2 86 

3 00 



3 55 



3 30 
3 21 



$2 91 
2 65 

2 85 

3 07 
2 70 

2 89 

3 09 
2 92 

2 74 

3 05 

2 72 
2 86 
2 61 



2 37 

3 24 
2 77 

2 60 

3 25 

2 91 

3 59 
3 22 
3 35 
3 01 

3 21 
2 87 
2 73 

2 76 

3 20 
3 30 
3 02 
2^70 



$3 38 



$2 93 



$12,200 OL 



14,000 00 
[24,965 00 



129,000 00 

35,000 00 

10,050 00 

50,000 00 



70,000 00 
1,639 75 



21-, 000 00 



199,400 00 
1,000 00 



,000 00 



1,281 25 
543,750 00 
110,428 00 



65,000 00 
17,248 00 

12,000 00 



115 



$3,043,129 81 



346 



Year Book 



GRADUATES 



Counties 



Graduates of Commissioned 
High Schools 



Male 



Female 



Total 



Graduates of Certified 
High Schools 



Male 



Female Total 



Graduates of Common Schools 



Male I Female 



Total 



Adams 

Allen 

Bartholomew . 

Benton 

Blackford. . . . 



Boone . 
Brown. 
Carroll . 
Cass... 
Clark. . 



Clay 

Clinton. . 
Crawford . 



Dearborn . 

Decatur. . 
Dekalb... 
Delaware . 
Dubois.. . 
Elkhart . . 



Fayette. . 
Floyd.... 
Fountain . 
Franklin. 
Fulton... 



Gibson.. . 

Grant 

Greene . . . 
Hamilton . 
Hancock . 



Harrison . . . 
Hendricks . . 

Henry 

Howard . . . . 
Huntington . 



Jackson . , 
Jasper . . . 

Jay 

Jefferson . 



Johnson . . . 

Knox 

Kosciusko. 



Lake. 



Laporte. . 
Lawrence. 



Marion 

Marshall 

Martin 

Miami 

Monroe 

Montgomery. 
Morgan 

Newton 

Noble 

Ohio 

Orange 

Owen 



31 

97 
48 
34 
26 

52 
8 
54 
64 
33 

54 
70 
30 
63 
35 

34 
55 
82 
31 
105 



45 

58 
76 
57 
77 
47 

16 
68 
62 
59 
83 

50 

33. 

50 

27 

12 

67 
88 
49 
36 



53 
110 
399 



11 

65 
87 
38 

76 
76 
23 
41 
34 

42 
59 

107 
34 

105 

50 
41 
61 



75 

72 
126 
81 
96 
36 

21 
94 
74 
84 
97 

54 
33 
59 
31 
19 

71 
101 
82 
47 
145 

77 
74 
165 
542 
93 

16 
68 
51 
120 
70 

34 

85 

9 

41 



175 
111 

78 
65 

112 
19 
119 
1.51 
71 

130 
146 
53 
104 



76 
114 
189 

65 
210 

78 
77 
119 



120 

130 
202 
138 
173 
83 



162 
136 
143 
180 

104 
66 
109 



138 
189 
131 
83 
239 

136 
127 
275 
941 
159 



106 
75 
187 
121 

64 
140 
19 
66 
55 



37 



10 



126 

337 

133 

73 

44 

140 
43 
114 
185 
132 

130 
164 

48 
127 

67 

107 
133 
241 
67 
270 

47 
118 
95 



177 
257 



165 



102 
148 
138 
142 



122 
57 

152 
79 
58 

126 
224 
202 
106 



152 
184 
233 
,260 
175 



162 
106 
133 
U)9 

79 
147 
9 
79 
67 



140 
373 
143 

78 
58 

161 
47 
161 
224 
161 

164 
175 
65 
162 



114 
154 
246 
80 
294 

72 
144 
145 

55 
102 

164 



187 
142 



154 
219 
125 
123 

164 
79 
185 



155 

306 

234 

92 



197 
205 



218 
124 
162 
153 

64 
170 

23 
105 

95 



Department Public Instruction 
GRADUATES — Continued 



347 



Counties 


Graduates of Commissioned 
High Schools 


Graduates of Certified 
High Schools 


Graduates of Common Schoolfl 




Male 


Female 


Total 


Male 1 Female 


Total 


Male 


Female 


Total 


Parke 


35 
11 
22 
26 
41 

20 
46 
74 
25 
40 

12 
46 
24 
22 
42 

116 
60 
15 
88 
37 

14 
75 
28 
118 

41 

20 
26 


45 
11 
22 
55 
39 

38 
75 
97 
41 
47 

28 
65 
35 
23 
59 

145 
69 
14 

119 
40 

20 
114 

50 
203 

83 
17 
44 


80 
22 
44 
81 
80 
N 
58 
121 
171 
66 
87 

40 
111 
59 
45 
101 

261 

129 

29 

207 

77 

34 
189 

78 
321 

124 
37 

70 


2 
13 
15 

"X'z" 


5 
17 
4 
2 
2 


7 

30 
19 
2 
5 


110 
53 
100 
118 
112 

77 
126 
118 
115 

71 

38 
166 
104 

76 
100 

215 
92 
• 43 
174 
134 

34 

42 
115 
385 

. 172 
74 
86 


125 
61 
114 
110 
140 

101 
151 
132 
142 

77 

59 
178 
111 

82 
89 

316 
115 

40 
217 

147 

35 
41 
153 

489 

192 
73 
111 


235 


Perry 


114 


Pike . . 


214 


Porter 


228 


Posey 


252 


Pulaski 


178 




3 


8 


11 


277 


Randolph . 


250 


Ripley 


3 

7 


4 
5 


7 
12 


257 


Rush 


148 


Scott 


97 


Shelby 








344 


Spencer 


2 


3 


5 


215 


Starke 


158 


Steuben 


2 


6 


8 


189 


St. Joseph 


531 


Sullivan 


4 
9 


9 
5 


13 
14 


207 


Switzerland 

Tippecanoe 

Tipton 


83 
391 








281 


Union. . 








69 


Vanderburgh. 








83 










268 


Vigo.. 


4 


7 


11 


874 


Wabash 


364 


Warren 


1 

27 
2 


3 

12 

1 


4 

39 

3 


147 


Warrick 


197 






Wayne 


82 
62 
44 
46 


109 

58 
58 
47 


191 
120 
102 
93 


261 
148 
124 
129 


274 
166 
140 
130 


535 


Wells .... 








314 


White 








264 


Whitley. 








259 












Totals 


4,676 


6,126 


10,802 


292 


306 


598 


12,684 


14,974 


27,658 



348 



Year Book 



AGGREGATE SALARIES PAID DURING THE YEAR. 



Counties 


County Seats 


Teachers of Regu- 
lar High School 
Subjects 


Teachers of Regu- 
lar Elementary 
Subjects 


Total 




Decatur 


S15,126 73 
77,691 50 
18,258 00 
21,230 71 
10,636 69 

22,346 75 

1,620 00 

• 16,654 74 

30,615 53 

15,520 00 

30,419 75 
31,323 53 
325 66 
23,361 25 
11,068 20 

14,915 00 
14,230 20 
49.996 86 
7,807 39 
39,906 22 

14,548 40 
17,309 97 
20, 113 50 
1,947 00 
20,577 00 

22,752 65 

31.354 59 
20,567 94 
20,397 50 
16,781 50 

7,505 30 
29,519 85 

21.355 34 
28,672 62 
33,475 80 

16,006 63 
8,045 50 

16, 177 00 
9,676 11 
7,524 76 

22,853 80 
32,860 72 
24,560 20 
11,651 60 
121,236 08 

37,222 15 
21,645 51 
55,361 99 
337,480 91 
16,248 00 

2,225 00 
24,490 64 
20,528 20 
43,459 20 
14,663 95 

4,605 00 
20, 189 45 
1,395 00 
9,457 75 
8,137 55 


$50,201 61 
282,294 79 
57,009 23 
46,095 81 
36,292 31 

67,305 20 
28,378 96 
44,938 80 
93,099 92 
66,951 18 

59,619 44 
73,264 01 
31,631 12 

60.299 90 
50,624 84 

58,355 09 
61,682 84 

144,808 81 
52,873 87 

134,839 21 

38,443 20 
58,335 94 
44,667 34 
38,780 70 
45,638 93 

79,235 48 
123,614 18 
98,278 21 
63,622 02 
45,610 32 

58,330 20 
49,769 94 
79,227 74 
81,528 91 
74,124 33 

61,179 01 
53,910 00 
61,006 46 
50,294 66 
38,583 44 

47, 134 80 
100,241 25 
70,947 43 
41,090 35 
353,733 69 

118,950 93 

82,568 34 

158.884 66 

866,490 66 

68,318 87 

33,758 23 
71,157 62 
67,890 27 
71,571 12 
62,773 07 

44,581 24 
57,741 31 
10,525 45 

48.300 02 
37,864 82 


$82,447 31 


Allen 


Ft. Wayne 


412.798 68 






104,549 03 


Benton 


Fowler 


84,848 52 
64 149 73 


Blackford 


Hartford City 

Lebanon . 


Boone 


108,621 00 




Nashville 


33,498 96 


Carroll 


Delphi 


83,712 84 


Cass...... 




165,065 83 


Clark 


Jeffersonville 


97,131 18 


Clay 


Brazil. 


118,394 22 




Frankfort 


129,242 04 


Crawford 


English 


44,046 61 






105,545 22 


Dearborn 


Lawrenceburg 


75,632 68 






95.474 84 


Dekalb 




99,546 74 


Delaware 


Muncie 


259,671 35 


Dubois 


Jdsper 


69,935 46 


Elkhart 


Goshen . . 


224.376 04 


Fayette . 


Connersville 


74,296 82 


Floyd 




95,463 40 


Fountain 


Covington ... ... 


90,329 22 




Brookville 


54.588 75 


Fulton 


Rochester . 


85,432 97 






130,183 58 


Grant 


Marion 


197.670 27 


Greene . 


Bloomfield 


146,912 15 




Noblesville 


117.840 94 


Hancock 


Greenfield 


86,762 32 


Harrison 


Corydon 

Danville 


80,508 97 




102,174 17 


Henry. . 


Newcastle 


135,577 82 






140,027 30 


Huntington 


Hxmtington 


136,720 78 






97,812 92 


JasDer 


Rensselaer 


74,625 25 




Portland 


98.088 71 


Jefferson 




76,337 89 






57,478 45 






95,485 73 


Knox 


Vincennes 


191,005 60 




Warsaw 


127,701 93 


Lagrange 


Lagrange 


70,610 45 


iST:. :.:.::::::: 




615,662 77 






207,516 41 


Lawrence 


Bedford 


126,545 10 






267,965 90 


Marion . 


Indianapolis 


1,400,948 82 


Marshall 




' 106,655 87 




Shoals 


43,063 23 


Miami 


Peru 


124,593 44 






108.952 62 


Montgomery . . 


Crawfordsville 


161,960 78 




101,297 30 


Newton 


Kentland . 


61 220 48 


Noble 




101,269 26 


Ohio 


Rising Sun 


14.545 45 




Paoli 


68,462 77 


Owen 


Spencer '. 


54,058 77 



Department Public Instruction 



349 



AGGREGATE SALARIES — Continued. 



Counties 


County Seats 


Teachers of Regu- 
lar High School 
Subjects 


Teachers of Regu- 
lar Elementary 
Subjects 


Total 


Parke 


Rockville 


$14,448 55 

8,345 00 

6,312 99 

16,590 30 

15,091 80 

\ 

8,445 70 

17,465 50 

28,447 33 

5,519 00 

16,960 50 

2,720 00 
15,477 45 
7,572 10 
4,860 00" 
8,810 10 

■ 74,092 10 

23,337 55 

1,715 00 

57,517 91 

12,289 10 

2,430 00 
65,483 31 
19,910 00 
84,719 61 

27,548 75 

7, 108 75 

10,954 00 

11,914 69 

43,243 83 
13,785 25 
15,751 72 
16,115 98 


$53,438 98 
44; 751 62 
43,777 34 
80,142 54 

49.283 25 

44,782 00 
56,689 53 
68, 104 35 
47,168 15 
49,485 63 

18,060 10 
67,170 08 
50,925 89 

38.284 55 
39,680 69 

307,791 99 
76,958 02 
27,319 09 

105,284 27 
40,271 95 

23,510 70 
285,750 08 

85,078 02 
306,832 90 

76,787 90 
37,639 64 
44,132 84 
50,084 70 

121,160 76 
59,815 95 
60,576 69 
43,880 15 


$85,099 90 
71,224 02 


Perry 




Pike 




60 552 93 


Porter 




122,154 81 


Posey. 




95,132 20 
64 340 20 


Pulaski... 




Putnani 


Greencastle 


98 528 03 


Randolph 


Winchester 


137,607 15 


Riolev 


Versailles 


62,490 15 
93,163 63 


Rush... 


Rushville 


Scott 


Scottsburg 


26 735 30 


Shelby 


ShelbyviUe 


117 182 70 




Rockport 


77 255 44 


Starke 


Knox 


55,516 75 


Steuben. . . 


Angola .... 


67,758 64 


St. Joseph 


South Bend 


482,483 66 


Sullivan 


Sullivan 


127,124 09 
34,709 34 






Tippecanoe 


Lafayette 


209,339 10 


Tipton... 


Tipton. . . 


65,784 80 


Union 


Liberty 

Evansville 


37,650 70 




393,913 39 


VftrTtiillinn 


Newport 


122 166 02 


Vigo 


Terre Haute 


488,175 37 


Wabash 


Wabash 


144,637 70 


Warren ... . ... 


Williamsport. .. 


52,649 10 


Warrick 


Boonville 


70,939 84 


Washington 


Salem 


72 605 17 


Wayne 


Richmond 

Bluffton 


216,410 66 


Wells 


91,845 76 


White... 


Monticello 

Columbia City 


93,135 40 


Whitley 


76,304 09 






Total 


$2,312,620 24 


$7,663,892 43 


$12,601,629 68 









850 



Year Book 



AGGREGATE SALARIES PAID DURING THE YEAR. 



Counties 



County Seats 



Superii|tendents 



Supervisors and 
Special Teachers 



Principals 



High 
Schools 



Elementary 
Schools 



Adams 

Allen 

Bartholomew 

Benton 

Blackford . . . 

Boone 

Brown 

Carroll 

Cass 

Clark 

Clay 

Clinton 

Crawford 

Daviess 

Dearborn — 

Decatiir 

Dekalb 

Delaware — 

Dubois 

Elkhart 

Fayette 

Floyd 

Fountain 

Franklin. . . . 
Fulton 

Gibson 

Grant 

Greene 

Hamilton 

Hancock. . . . 

Harrison .... 
Hendricks . . . 

Henry 

Howard 

Huntington.. 

Jackson 

Jasper 

Jay 

Jefferson. . . . 
Jennings. . . . 

Johnson 

Knox 

Kosciusko. . . 
Lagrange .... 
Lake 

Laporte 

Lawrence 

Madison .... 

Marion 

Marshall 

Martin 

Miami 

Monroe 

Montgomery . 
Morgan 

Newton 

Noble 

Ohio 

Orange 

Owen 



Decatur 

Ft.Wayne.... 

Columbus 

Fowler ' 

Hartford City. 

Lebanon 

Nashville 

Delphi 

Logansport . . . 
Jeff ersonville . . 

Brazil 

Frankfort 

English 

Washington . . . 
Lawrenceburg . 

Greensburg . . . 

Auburn 

Muncie 

Jasper 

Goshen 

Connersville. . 
New Albany . . 

Covington 

Brookville .... 
Rochester. . . . 

Princeton 

Marion 

Bloomfield 

Noblesville . . . 
Greenfield .... 

Corydon 

Danville 

Newcastle .... 

Kokomo 

Huntington . . . 

Brownstown . . 
Rensselaer .... 

Portland 

Madison 

Vernon 

Franklin 

Vincennes . . . . 

Warsaw 

Lagrange 

Crown Point.. 

Laporte 

Bedford 

Anderson 

Indianapolis. . 
Plymouth 

Shoals 

Peru.. 

Bloomington . . 
Crawfordsville 
Martinsville. . 

Kentland 

Albion 

Rising Sun. . . 

Paoli 

Spencer 



$3,999 97 
4,008 11 
3,700 00 
1,440 00 
3,183 33 

3,650 00 
1,000 00 
2,900 00 
5,475 00 
1,800 00 

3,276 70 
2,550 00 
3,115 00 
3,020 00 
4, 600 00 

3,300 00 
8,315 00 
5,691 67 
3,150 00 
9,225 00 

2,000 00 
3,240 00 
7,060 00 
1,500 00 
1,890 00 

3,700 00 
6,987 00 
5,990 00 
4,100 00 
2,600 00 

1,106 25 
1,500 00 
4,230 00 
2,794 00 
6,718 75 

4,200 00 
3,562 00 
4,500 00 
1,800 00 
2,400 00 

4,702 00 
4,800 00 
4,675 00 
1,500 00 
19,488 18 

5,500 00 
3,850 00 
11,092 86 
18,224 12 
5,225 00 

2,300 00 
4,366 67 
2,400 00 
3,000 00 
3,600 00 

4,675 24 
3,600 00 
1,200 00 
5,200 00 
2,396 00 



$3, 130 00 
14,019 00 
11,395 20 
2,946 50 
6,488 25 

4,769 00 
310 00 
5,470 10 
11,834 17 
2,070 00 

1,554 00 
4,972 00 
5,907 83 
5,780 25 
3,336 80 

7,959 50 
6,386 20 

23,978 43 
1,163 80 

17,878 11 

6,158 10 
5,445 00 
8,732 63 
1,755 00 
4,118 00 

6', 862 45 
11,902 50 

9,448 00 
10,630 42 

5,791 50 

5,819 50 
3,696 00 
13,955 90 
9,971 70 
7,765 00 

3,397 66 
2,952 00 
4,649 25 
4,216 42 
675 00 

7,275 09 

28,965 58 

7,777 25 

3,730 00 

55,866 31 

17,941 60 

4,844 25 

12,723 23 

38,499 63 

7, 186 50 

2,590 00 
5,103 13 
9,057 44 
14,533 53 



3,024 00 
5,621 50 

675 00 
1,800 00 

919 80 



$6,821 00 
7,333 17 

5.585 00 
11,875 50 

4,063 25 

8,075 05 
2, 160 00 
8,880 00 
10,912 16 
4, 670 00 

8,402 98 
11,332 50 
3,067 00 
8,675 00 
2, 120 00 

9,075 25 
6,661 50 
12,164 50 
4,940 40 
8v705 00 

8,546 00 
3,385 00 
6,028 89 
6,176 25 
8, 157 50 

12,570 00 
10,015 00 
9,540 00 
11,090 00 
10,256 50 

6,373 00 
12,082 63 
10,426 84 

7,984 07 

9.586 90 

8,915 00 
4,805 75 
7,366 00 
6,170 70 
8,295 25 

10,648 66 
15,679 00 
13,477 40 
10,850 50 
20,359 68 

17,964 50 
9,090 00 
6,689 56 

27,872 40 
8,867 50 

2, 190 00 
9; 947 53 
5,934 63 
14,772 05 
8,347 51 

4,335 00 
9,332 00 
750 00 
3,025 00 
4, 109 00 



$3,168 00 

27,452 11 

8,601 60 

1,260 00 

3,485 90 

2,475 00 



4,869 20 
13, 129 05 
6, 120 00 

15,121 35 
5,800 00 



4,408 82 
3,882 84 

1,870 00 

2,271 00 

23.031 08 



13,822 50 

4,601 12 

7,747 49 

3,726 86 

4,429 80 

5,051 54 

5,063 00 

13,797 00 

3,088 00 

8,001 00 

5,722 50 

1,374 72 

5,605 75 

6,382 00 

9,076 00 

5,050 00 

4,114 62 
1,350 00 
4,390 00 

4, 180 00 



2,871 38 
8,459 05 
6,264 65 
1,788 00 
44.978 83 



4,547 00 

23,213 60 

112,381 10 

810 00 



9,527 85 
3, 142 08 
14,624 88 
3,104 47 



4,785 00 



680 00 
631 60 



Department Public Instruction 
AGGREGATE SALARIES — Continued. 



351 



COXJNTIES 



Parke. 
Perry . 
Pike.. 
Porter . 
Posey . 



Pulaski . . . 
Putnam. . 
Randolph . 
Ripley . . . 



Scott. 
Shelby. 



Starke. . 
Steuben. 



St. Joseph. . 
Sullivan .... 
Switzerland . 
Tippecanoe . 
Tipton 



Union 

Vanderburgh . 
Vermillion . . . 
Vigo 



Wabash 

Warren .... 
Warrick .... 
Washington . 



Wayne . . 
Wells. . . 
White... 
Whitley. 



Total. 



County Seats 



Rockville . . . 
Cannelton . . 
Petersburg . . 
Valparaiso . . 
Mt. Vernon. 



Winamac... 
Greencastle. 
Winchester . 
Versailles... 
Rushville... 



Scottsburg . 
Shelbyville. 
Rockport . . 

Knox 

Angola .... 



South Bend. 

Sullivan 

Vevay 

Lafayette . . . 
Tipton 



Liberty 

Evansville . . . 
Newport . . . . 
Terre Haute . 



Wabash. . . . . 
Williamsport . 
BoonviUe .... 
Salem 



Richmond. . . . . 

Bluffton 

Monticello 

Coliunbia City. 



Superintendents 



$1,800 00 
3,100 00 
1,200 00 
2,400 00 
4,750 00 

1,350 00 
4,500 00 
4,300 00 
4, 170 00 
3,200 00 

1,000 00 

2,541 62 

3,862 50 

3,560 00 

1,975 00 

7,540 00 

6,142 27 

2,900 00 

5,050 00 

1,500 00 

2,660 00 
5,730 00 
3,400 00 
7,600 00 

4,580 00 

1,343 00 

1,120 00 

2,137 78 

7,768 37 
1,800 00 
4,739 99 
3,275 00 



$374,068 38 



Supervisors and 
Special Teachers 



.$3,104 87 
3,655 00 
3,199 40 
6,220 97 
6,426 75 

2,100 00 
5,198 50 
15,319 62 
908 00 
8,790 00 

1,224 00 
10,495 20 
3,038 47 
2,526 00 
8,357 25 

51,581 57 

4,761 25 

925 00 

13,459 17 
5,622 25 

2,555 00 
10,615 00 

2,068 00 
16,229 25 

13,438 60 
3,263 75 
5,825 00 
2,430 00 

11,385 56 
5,537 56 
4,207 00 
4,477 00 



$745,184 



Principals 



High 
Schools 



$8,840 00 
8,025 00 
5,457 20 

12,895 00 
8,001 00 

6,897 50 
12,244 50 
18,670 85 

4,725 00 
11,937 50 

2,180 00 
8,999 45 
5,322 78 
5,400 00 
8,935 60 

9,535 00 
10, 707 50 

1,850 25 
15,611 33 

6,101 50 

6,495 00 
4,000 00 
7,880 00 
14,263 25 

13,101 00 
3,293 96 
7,443 00 
5,228 00 

14,862 52 
8,427 00 
7,860 00 
8,555 96 



$791,279 11 



Elementary 
Sch(jol.s 



$3,467 50 

3,347 40 

606 00 

3,900 00 

11,579 40 

765 00 
2,430 00 
2,765 00 



2,790 00 

1,551 20 

12,498 90 

6,533 70 

886 20 



31,943 00 
5,217 50 



12,416 42 



22,335 00 

3,830 00 

58,530 36 

9.181 45 



,465 00 
810 00 



17,989 62 
2,480 00 



$714,585 



352 



Year Book 



COST OF INSTRUCTION. 

Certified High Schools. 



Counties 


Coimty Seats 


Amount paid 
Teachers 


Amount paid 

for Apparatus, 

Books. Etc. 


Cost of 
Maintenance 


Average Cost 
per Pupil 


Adams 


Decatur 


$6,257 75 


$6,076 76 


$12,334 51 


- $118 60 


Allen.. 


Ft. Wayne 




Bartholomew. . . 


Columbus 










Benton 


Fowler 


6,315 00 


3,255 52 


9,570 52 


111 28 


Blackford 


Hartford City 




Boone 














NashviUe 


2,401 00 
1,820 00 


385 50 
947 00 


2,786 50 
2,767 00 


52 90- 


Carroll 


Delphi 


57 64 


Cass 






Clark 


Jeffersonville 

Brazil 


4,800 00 
4,590 00 


,311 80 
1,699 14 


5,111 80 
6,289 14 


43 69 


Clay 


66 20 


Clinton 


Frankfort 




Crawford 














Washington 


3,535 00 


585 31 


4,120 31 


82 40 






Decatur 


Greensburg 

Auburn 


1,960 00 


1,048 34 


3.008 34 


75 88 


Dekalb 




Delaware 












Dubois 




1,443 41 


314 00 


1,757 41 


48 41 


Elkhart 


Goshen 




Fayette 


Connersville 

New Albany 


2,358 00 


1,633 47 


3,991 47 


128 75 


Floyd 
















Franklin 


Brookville 

Rochester 

Princeton 

Marion 


i, 120 66 
4,248 28 

4,362 50 


121 22 
3,368 69 

777 59 


1,241 22 
7,616 97 

5,140 09 


51 71 


Fulton 


77 72 


Gibson 


74 19 


Grant 






Bloomfield 

Noblesville 


. 8,908 77 


1,763 10 


10,671 87 


52 31 






Hancock 


Greenfield 














13,500 90 


2,287 80 


15,788 70 


57 32 


Hendricks 


Danville 




Henry 


Newcastle 










Howard 


Kokomo 


2,720 00 
5,368 20 

1,360 00 
1,465 75 


2,162 36 
3,280 64 

128 00 
985 20 


4,882 36 
8,648 84 

1,488 00 
2,450 95 


82 72 


Huntington 


Huntington 

Brownstown 

Rensselaer 

Portland 


. 56 90 

42 28 


Jasper 


118 53 


Jay 




Jefferson 


Madison . 


5,018 25 
6,015 04 


1,536 06 
1,630 64 


6,554 31 
7,645 68 


59 56 






56 63 


Johnson 


Franklin 




Knox 






:::::::::::::::: ::::::::::::::: 






Warsaw 


4,868 10 
2,240 00 


1,235 30 
546 13 


6,103 40 
2,786 13 


91 09 


Lagrange 


Lagrange 


126 64 


Lake 


Crown Point 




Laporte 


Laporte 










Lawrence 


Bedford 


4,750 00 


575 22 


5,325 22 


60 53 


Madison 


Anderson 




Marion 


Indianapolis 

Plymouth 

Shoals 


2,457 75 
1,709 50 

1,575 00 
5,545 00 


911 97 
700 25 

127 39 
1,294 70 


3,369 72 
2,409 75 

1,702 39 
6,839 70 


153 12 


Marshall 


65 13 


Martin 


63 05 




Peru 


51 04 








Montgomery 


Crawfordsville .... 
Martinsville 

Kentland 


6,625 03 
1,880 00 


1,894 61 
200 00 


8,519 64 
2,080 00 


82 79 
90 43 


Newton 




Noble 


Albion 










Ohio 


Rising Sun 











Orange 


Paoli 










Owe^ 


Spencer 


4.628 69 


464 90 


4,493 59 


67 07 



Department Public Instruction 

COST OF INSTRUCTION — Continued. 



853 



Counties 


County Seats 


Amount paid 
Teachers 


Amount paid 

for Apparatus, 

Books. Etc. 


Cost of 
Maintenance 


Average Co^ 
per Pupil 


Parke 


Rockville 


$3,844 25 
12,435 00 
5,411 20 
1,845 00 

• 


$435 00 

1,166 01 

1,470 77 

231 60 


$4,279 25 
13,601 01 
6.881 97 
2,076 60 


$46 01 


Perry 


Cannelton 

Petersburg 

Valparaiso 

Mt. Vernon 


93 16 


Kke 


55 95 


Porter 


148 33 


Poaey 




Pulaski 




\ . . . 










Greencastle....... 

Winchester 


■2,160 00 


1,300 00 


3,460 00 


96 ii 


Randolph 




Ripley 


Versailles... 


1,078 00 
5,331 00 


257 98 
1,585 89 


1,335 98 
6,916 89 


44 53 


Rush 


Rushville 


72 06 


Scott 


Scottsburg 




Shelby 


Shelbjrville 










Spencer 


Rockport 


2,298 00 
1,620 00 
1,878 75 


236 60 
472 50 
651 96 


2,534 60 
2,092 50 
2,530 71 


55 10 


Starke 


Knox 


110 13 


Steuben 


Angola 


52 72 


St. Joseph 

Sullivan 


South Bend 




buiii\!»i> 7 549 87 


1,945 00 
256 10 


9,494 87 
3,231 35 


77 36 


Switzerland . ... 


Vevay 


2,975 25 


38 46 








Tipton 


Tipton 










Union 


Liberty 






















Vermillion . 


Newport . . 


1.850 00 
2,720 00 


150 00 
533 54 


2,000 00 
3,253 54 


66 66 


Vigo 


Terre Haute 

Wabash 


48 55 


Wabash 




Warren 


WilUamsport 

Boonville 


1,560 00 
10,215 00 
2,720 00 


1,023 18 

1,267 66 

290 43 


2,583 18 
11,482 66 
3,010 43 


89 07 


Warrick 


64 87 


Washington 


Salem 


41 08 


Wayne 


Richmond 




Wells 


Bluffton 










White . 


Monticello 










Whitley 


Columbia City 






















Total 


$192,738 24 


$55,522 83 


$248,261 07 


$74 30 









23^13956 



854 



Year Book 



COST OF INSTRUCTION. 

Commissioned High Schools. 



Counties 


County Seats 


Amount Paid 
Teachers 


Amount Paid 

for Apparatus, 

Books, Etc. 


Cost of 
Maintenance 


Average 

Cost per 

Pupil 


Adams 


Decatur 

Ft. Wayne 


$19,130 07 
84,464 6? 
28, 125 53 
26,058 96 
17,280 28 

35,228 02 
2,312 00 
25,828 15 
48,744 69 
14,469 98 

28,219.81 
44,442 83 
11,909 74 
26,728 27 
14,645 65 

24,612 91 
28,636 70 
59,664 32 
13,614 96 
62,095 92 

18,871 90 
21,575 02 
28,605 30 
4,322 50 
27,462 50 

33,672 53 
50,710 41 
31,074 17 
42,604 55 
29,998 75 

4,802 50 
44,447 03 
39,962 89 
35,152 31 
46, 186 63 

26,451 83 
16,699 50 
27,538 78 
12,149 39 
6,260 83 

35,754 03 
53,672 49 
42,410 10 
20,623 10 
151,655 80 

61,256 55 
29,049 07 
68,378 GO 
358,909 35 
32,169 25 

5,758 75 
30,000 17 
28,092 95 
57,065 48 
26,788 96 

12,798 21 
36,043 89 

2,940 00 
15,797 00 

7,716 75 


$4,430 20 
20,818 31 

5,648 79 
11,716 72 

6,624 36 

16,696 75 
1,102 83 
10,361 01 
15,240 48 
5,860 02 

22,103 20 

14,172 99 

1,183 24 

8,904 48 

3,244 58- 

7,200 25 
5,022 96 

23,*98 02 
2,049 10 

37,244 32 

6,557 44 
5,798 94 
9,451 42 
840 68 
6,679 97 

8,244 04 
19,701 31 

9,887 32 
14,264 91 
10, 189 49 

949 79 
13,863 27 
9,478 42 
13,340 28 
16,371 93 

6,879 30 
3,758 60 
6,971 62 
2,449 37 
1,204 28 

10,944 63 
9,143 65 
14,465 17 
11,298 16 
37,430 59 

22,476 31 
7,203 44 
21,767 64 
128,514 77 
11,390 38 

855 77 
13,872 24 

5,542 88 
15,516 02 

5,311 93 

5,157 85 
12,237 19 
710 82 
4,635 45 
2,971 87 


$23,560 27 
105,282 98 

33.774 32 

37.775 68 
23,904 64 

51,924 77 

3,414 83 

36,189 16 

63,985 17 

20.330 00 

50,323 01 
58,615 82 
13,092 98 
35,632 75 
17,890 23 

31,813 16 
33,659 66 
82,762 34 
15,664 06 
99,340 24 

25,429 34 
27,373 96 
38,056 72 . 
5,163 18 
22,119 97 

41,916 57 
70,411 72 
37,961 49 
56,869 46 
40, 188 24 

5,752 29 
58,310 32 
49 441 31 
48,492 59 

62.558 56 

33.331 13 
20,458 10 
34,510 40 
14,598 76 

7,465 11 

46,698 66 
62,816 14 
56 875 27 
31,921 26 
189,086 39 

83,732 86 

36,252 51 

90,145 64 

487,424 12 

43.559 63 

6,614 52 
43,872 41 
33,635 83 
72,581 50 
32, 100 89 

17,956 06 
48,281 08 
3,650 82 
20,432 45 
10,688 62 


$59 05 


Allen 


82 17 


Bartholomew 


Coliunbus 


53 52 


Benton 


Fowler 


91 46 


Blackford.... 


Hartford City 


55 01 


Boone 


Lebanon 


70 74 


Brown 


NashviUe 


38 36 


Carroll 


Delphi . . . 


61 65 


Cass. 


Logansport 


68 09 


Clark 


Jeffersonville 


46 12 


Clay 


Brazil.... 


72 09 


Clinton 


Frankfort 


65 63 


Crawford .... 


English 


77 30 


Daviess 




62 70 


Dearborn 


Lawrenceburg 


53 08 


Decatur 


Greensburg 


70 28 


Dekalb 




41 09 


Delaware 


Muncie 


54 20 


Dubois 


Jasper 


55 80 


Elkhart . 


Goshen 


71 57 


Fayette. 


Connersville 


65 70 


Floyd 




50 71 


Fountain 


Covington 


48 25 


Franklin 


Brookville 


49 64 


Fulton ... . 


Rochester 


34 34 


Gibson 


Princeton 


57 56 


Grant 




54 54 


Greene .... 


BlnoTTifip.lrl 


47 33 




Noblesville 


57 79 


Hancock 


Greenfield 

Corydon 


74 98 


Harrison .... 


39 81 


Hendricks 


Danville 


61 97 


Henry 


Newcastle 


52 08 






52 31 


Huntington 




48 72 


Jackson . . . 


Brownstown 


56 96 






52 21 


Jay 


Portland 


56 37 


Jefferson 


Madison 


47 86 


Jennings 


Vernon 


48 78 


Johnson . . 


Franklin 


56 24 


Knox 




56 18 


Kosciusko . . . 


Warsaw 


59 50 






77 47 


Lake :': 


Crown Point 


82 21 


Laporte ■ . 


Laporte 

Bedford 


89 38 




47 57 


Madison . . . 


Anderson . 


53 69 




Indianapolis 

Plymouth 

Shoals 


78 57 


Marshall 


58 16 


Martin 


47 24 




Peru 


62 94 


Monroe . . 


Bloomington 


53 22 


Montgomery 

Morgan . . . 


Crawfordsville 

Martinsville 


67 44 
50 95 


Newton 


Kentland 

Albion 

Rising Sun 

Paoli 


57 91 


Noble 


64 12 


Ohio 


42 21 


Orange 

Owen 


53 25 


Spencer 


48 15 



Department Public Instruction 

COST OF INSTRUCTION — Continued. 



3^5 



Counties 



County Seats 



Amount Paid 
Teachers 



Amount Paid 

for Apparatus, 

Books, Etc. 



Cost of 
Maintenance 



Average 

Cost per 

Pupil 



Parke. 
Perry. 
Pike.. 
Porter . 
Posey. 



Pulaski . . . 
Putnam . . 
Randolph . 
Ripley. .. 
Rush 



Scott. 



Spencer . 
Starke. . 
Steuben. 



St. Joseph. . 
Sullivan . . . . 
Switzerland . 
Tippecanoe. 
Tipton 



Union 

Vanderburgh. 
Vermillion.. . 
Vigo 



Warren .... 
Warrick .... 
Washington. 



Wayne . . 
Wells. . . 
White... 
Whitley. 



Rockville . . . 
Cannelton . . 
Petersburg. . 
Valpariaiso . 
Mt. Vernon. 



Winamac . . . 
Greencastlfi. 
Winchester . 
Versailles . . . 
Rushville... 



Scottsburg. 
Shelby ville. 
Rockport . . 

Knox 

Angola 



South Bend . 

SuUivan 

Vevay 

Lafayette... 
Tipton 



Liberty 

Evansville.. . 
Newport . . . . 
Terre Haute . 



Williamsport . 
Boonville .... 
Salem 



Richmond 

Bluffton 

Monticello 

Columbia City . 



$22,274 17 

8,318 00 

9,325 91 

28,716 07 

30,003 90 

17,745 86 
26,892 60 
48,974 06 
12,851 50 
23,666 65 

5,200 00 
28,982 53 
18,360 60 
12,534 00 
24,934 63 

102,951 48 
28,579 76 
4,415 00 
66,278 56 
22,747 25 

6,845 00 
72,540 75 
22,863 51 
105,916 86 

48,700 80 

9,023 34 

12,754 00 

13,723 48 

65,644 71 
24,319 85 
30, 120 30 
24,824 18 



$6,894 88 
1,389 52 
1,829 45 

13,129 36 
7,468 75 

5,906 18 
6,466 00 
16,868 53 
2,739 35 
9,156 14 

1,629 66 
9,201 99 
3,063 40 
3,741 04 
6,795 01 

41,387 63 

5, 148 44 

857 07 

46,068 44 
7,266 01 

2,121 53 

20,387 89 

7,181 25 

26,567 58 

24,361 78 
4,316 68 
3,757 30 
4,848 48 

23,931 77 
8,368 78 

6.685 19 

5.686 23 



$29, 169 05 

9,707 52 

11,155 36 

41,845 43 

37,472 65 

23,652 04 
33,358 60 
65,842 59 
15,590 85 
32,822 79 

6,829 66 
38,184 52 
21,424 00 
16,275 04 
31,729 64 

144,339 11 
33,728 20 
5,272 07 

112,347 00 
30,013 26 

8,966 53 
92,928 64 
30,044 76 
132,484 44 

73,062 58 
13,340 02 
16,511 30 
18,571 96 

89,576 48 
32,688 63 
36,805 49 
30,510 41 



169 45 
81 57 
37 30 
81 73 
70 09 

73 91 
53 03 
60 59 
47 53 

74 59 

41 64 

59 85 

56 67 

58 77 
65 02 

83 43 

45 40 
40 55 

84 64 

67 68 

53 12 

62 28 
58 91 

63 03 

88 13 
78 93 

46 38 

42 59 

68 34 
53 15 
62 04 

57 67 



Total. 



$3,222,671 99 



$1,063,273 06 



$4,285,945 05 



$59 80 



356 



Year Book 



ENTIRE NUMBER SCHOOL HOUSES. 



Counties 


Concrete 


Stone 


Brick 


Frame 


Log 


Total 


Adams 


1 
2 

1 




87 
180 
51 
15 
42 

61 
1 
47 
71 
19 

69 
42 
2 
36 
50 

58 
90 
72 
8 
117 

16 
15 

18 
42 
45 

20 
122 
40 

72 
54 

3 
61 

48 
52 
105 

20 
10 
94 
15 
51 

44 
42 
79 
47 
61 

66 

16 

132 

109 

44 

5 

66 
12 
51 

74 

9 

70 
1 
5 

7 


6 

9 

25 

43 

3 

35 
72 
19 
20 
79 

39 

23 

80 

50- 

40 

1 
5 
2 
93 
13 

21 
37 
36 
17 
24 

93 

7 

108 

5 

6 

^ 143 
6 
17 

2 




94 


Allen 


l"" 




192 


Bartholomew 




77 


Benton 






58 


Blackford 








45 


Boone 








96 


Brown 








73 


Carroll . . 








67 


Cass 






91 


Clark. 







2 


100 


Clay...... 






108 


Clinton 




1 




66 


Crawford.. 


3 
1 




85 


Daviess 






87 


Dearborn 


4 




94 


Decatur. 


1 
2 
1 


60 


Dekalb 






97 


Delaware 






75 


Dubois 






101 


Elkhart . 




1 




131 


Fayette... 






31 


Floyd 








52 


Fountain 








54 


Franklin 


1 


10 




70 


Fulton 




69 


Gibson... 








113 


Grant 








129 










148 


Hamilton 








77 






1 




61 








146 


TTpTiflrinkfi 








67 










65 


Howard 








54 




1 
2 






106 






78 
71 
4 
44 
34 

4 
43 

5 
35 
57 

30 
91 
10 
27 
55 

90 
19 
89 
8 
15 

60 
3 
24 
90 

84 




100 


Jasper 






81 


Jay . . 








98 


Jefferson 




29 




88 








85 










48 


TCnox 








85 




1 






85 


Laeransft 


1 
1 

1 
3 < 




83 


Lake :::::::: 






119 




1 




98 


Lawrence 




110 








142 


Marion 


45 


1 




-•182 


Marshall 




99 










95 






1 
6 
6 




86 


Monroe 






107 








65 








89 


Newton 








69 


Noble 








73 


Ohio 








25 










95 


Owen 








91 



Department f'UBLic Instruction 

ENTIRE NUMBER SCHOOL HOUSES — Continued. 



sti 



Counties 


Concrete 


Stone 


Brick 


Frame 


Log 


Total 


Parke 






23 
6 
10 
48 
45 

15 
26 
37 
65 
41 

28 
86 
41 

27 
78 

82 
62 
18 
52 
49 

23 
65 
35 
55 

59 
16 
11 
4 

66 
94 
13 
76 


70 
102 
88 
27 
24 

59 
76 
35 
27 
5 

13 
2 

65 
23 
13 

55 

50 

49 

10 

4 

6 

30 
26 

77 

5 
55 

107 
120 

7 




93 


Perry 








108 


Pike 








98 


Porter 


2 
2 






77 


Posey ... 






71 


Pulaski 






74 










102 




1 






73 


Ripley 


11 




103 


Rush 






46 


Scott • 








41 


Shelby 








88 


Spencer 








106 


Starke 


1 






51 


Steuben 






91 


St. Joseph 








137 


Sullivan 








112 


Switzerland.. . . 




8 

1 




75 








63 


Tipton 






53 


Union .... 








29 










95 


Vermillion 


2 






63 


Vigo 






132 


Wabash 








64 


Warren 








71 


Warrick 








118 










124 


Wayne 








73 


Wells 


1 






95 


White 




73 
3 




86 


Whitley 


4 






83 










Total. . . 


77 1 87 


4,311 


3,555 


2 


8 032 











358 



Year Book 



SCHOOL HOUSES, ASSESSMENT AND RATE. 



COUNTIES 


TOWNS 


Estimated Value 

of all School 

Houses and 

Grounds 


Total Assessment 

Reported By 

Assessor 

in 1917 


Rate of 

Special 

School 

Tax 

Levied on 

Each $1.00 


Rate of 
Local 
Tax for 
Tuition 
on Each 
$1.00 


Adams 


Decatur... . 


$656,100 00 
2., 384, 075 00 
421,900 00 
385,000 00 
367,000 00 

517,835 00 
52,400 00 
385,775 00 
790,200 00 
389,500 00 

517,750 00 
667,000 00 
72,950 00 
387,000 00 
186,950 00 

470,600 00 
1,486,100 00 
1,558,666 30 

188,330 00 
1,204,400 00 

370,000 00 
443,768 56 
401,500 00 
117,100 00 
483,100 00 

662,575 00 
1,206,000 00 
453,275 00 
543,600 00 
446,000 00 

167,500 00 
469,700 00 
748,000 00 
876,059 00 
778,000 00 

456,400 00 
219,950 00 
415.400 00 
286,000 00 
153,000 00 

617,500 00 

1,074,634 35 

631,420 39 

309,964 00 

4,201,718 60 

•1,097,160 00 

544,770 00 

1,307,800 00 

5,851,247 00 

511,500 00 

87,500 00 

658,300 00 

471,100 00 

1,019,300 00 

395,800 00 

240,600 00 
522,390 00 
30,000 00 
171,746 00 
193,800 00 


$16,202,100 00 
70,863,540 00 
22,164,065 00 
10,369,950 00 
10,897,295 00 

27,026,605 00 
234,706 00 
15,665,402 00 
26,996,344 00 
14,421,910 00 

15,447,225 00 
26,857,515 00 
2,814,045 00 
14,562,062 00 
10,436,730 00 

17,5Q4,850 00 
19,074,000 00 
35,765,845 00 
9,136,455 00 
24,842,210 00 

13,459,705 00 
13,548,995 00 
5,959,890 00 
10,046,510 00 
15,526,360 00 

18,330,530 00 
. 31,471,748 00 
17,553,315 00 
21,695,863 00 
21,104,780 00 

6,465,110 00 
10,659,555 00 
24,566,960 00 
25,693,350 00 
24,095,490 00 

15,999,990 00 
5,311,847 00 

18,175,120 00 
9,438,240 00 
6,509,980 00 

19,783,755 00 
28,373,815 00 
23,241,960 00 
13,210,692 00 
92,663,040 00 

37,624,059 00 
14,558,489 00 
38,583,440 00 
310,395,410 00 
21,484,145 00 

4,757,985 00 
17,991,150 00 
11,555,860 00 

9,128,480 00 
18,122,200 00 

14,447,684 00 
20,298,650 00 
2,033.205 00 
6,378,220 00 
7,110,798 00 


.49 
.30 
.30 
.45 
.46 

.37 
.46 
.50 
.48 
.29 

.57 
.35 
.42 
.58 
.35 

.39 
.48 
.53 
.34 

.58 

.47 
.35 
.85 
.39 
.64 

.39 
.47 
.44 
.46 
.42 

.40 
.55 
.57 
.48 
.52 

.46 
.40 
.35 
.41 
.45 

.53 
.51 
.51 
.56 
.57 

.52 
.54 
.46 . 
.62 
.47 

.46 
.67 
.60 
.47 
.46 

.39 
.45 
.29 
.54 
.55 


24 


Allen 


Ft.Wayne 


.21 


Barthclomew 


Columbus. . 


21 




Fowler 


.30 


Blackford . 


Hartford City 


33 


Boone 


Lebanon. ... 


28 




Nashville 


.35 


Carroll 


Delphi . 


38 


Cass 




.42 


Clark. . 


Jeffersonville 


.32 


Clay 


Brazil 


.39 


Clinton 


Frankfnrt 


.28 


Crawford 


English 


.31 






.44 


Dearborn 


Lawrenceburg 


.29 


Decatur 


Greensburg 


.38 


Dekalb 




.30 


Delaware . . 


Muncie 


.33 






.31 


Elkhart . 


Goshen 


.42 


Fayette 


Connersville 


.36 


Floyd 


New Albany. 


.25 


Fountain 


Covington 


.32 


Franklin 


Brockville 


.22 


Fulton . 


Rochester . . . 


.34 


Gibson 


Princeton . . . . 


.37 


Grant 


Marion 


* .35 


Greene 


Bloomfield 


.37 




Noblesville 


.35 


Hancock . 


Greenfield 


.28 






.34 




Danville 


.33 


Henry 


Newcastle 


.41 


Howard 


Kokomo . 


.32 


Huntington . 


Huntington 


.33 






.38 


Jasper 


Rensselaer 


.37 


Jay 


Portland 


.31 


Jefferson 


Madison 


.30 


Jennings. ... 


Vernon 


.38 




Franklin 


.37 


Knox . 


Vincennes ... 


.38 




Warsaw 


.34 


Lagrange . 


Lagrange . . 


.37 


Lake .::;:;.:..:::: 




.32 






.34 




Bedford. 


.46 






.40 


Marion . . . 


Indianapolis . 


.50 


Marshall 


Plymouth 


.33 


Martin 


Shoals 


.40 




Peru 


.45 


Monroe 


Bloomington . . 


.39 


Montgomery 


Crawfordsville 

Martinsville 


.38 


Morgan 


.42 


Newton . . 


Kentland 


.32 


Noble 


Albion 


.29 


Ohio 


Rising Sun 


.31 




Paoli 


.42 


Owen 


Spencer 


.35 



Department Public Instruction 359 

SCHOOL HOUSES, ASSESSMENT AND RATE — Continued. 



counties 


TOWNS 


Estimated Value 

of all School 

Houses and 

Grounds 


Total Assessment 

Reported By 

Assessor 

in 1917 


Rate of 

Special 

School 

Tax 

Levied on 

Each $1.00 


Rate of 
Local 
Tax for 
Tuition 
on Each 
$1.00 


Parke 


Rockville 


$315,000 GO 

144,800 GO 

189.300 GO 

450,400 GO 

1,289.956 GO 

330,000 GO 
462,500 00 
706,000 00 
187,200 GO 
613,000 GO 

112,500 GO 
660,000 00 
263,300 GO 
244,000 GO 
370,000 GO 

3,950,566 80 

596,000 GO 

74,000 GO 

1,312,300 00 

34,600,000 GO 

176,000 00 
2,278,900 GO 

393,150 00 
2,429,166 37 

826,100 00 
211,000 GO 
284,000 00 
197,840 GO 

112,300 GO 
352,970 00 
325,400 00 
405.000 00 


$15,151,7^ GO 

4,368,710 GO 

7,530,155 00 

23,359,080 GO 

4,021,840 GO 

10,107,614 00 
18,284,275 00 
25,357,610 GO 
8,540,630 GO 
23.263,795 GO 

3,930.450 GO 
25,109,389 GO 
8,452,540 GO 
8,952,360 GO 
10,124,745 GO 

58,845,420 00 
19,501,005 GO 
1,094,212 GO 
39,947,455 GO 
15,119,960 GO 

6,911,260 GO 
57,029,790 GO 
16.111,905 GO 
61,463,941 GO 

22,612,775 GO 
15,164,500 GO 
9,532,330 GO 
8,686,240 00 

36,616,203 GO 
18,811,085 00 
15,801,720 GO 
16,975,010 00 


.41 

.61 
.32 
.41 
.44 

.51 
.47 
.53 
.32 
.46 

.46 
.28 
.43 
.55 
.68 

.46 
.64 
.69 
.63 

.38 

.40 
.47 
.51 
.64 

.62 
.40 
.46 
.41 

.48 
.43 
.56 
.40 


.36 


Perry 


Cannelton 


.45 


Pike 


Petersburg 


.29 


Porter 




.36 


Posey . ... 


Mt. Vernon 


.44 


Pulaski 


Winamac 


.45 






.38 


Randolph 


Winchester 


.44 






.24 


Rush 


Rushville. 


29 


Scott 


Scottsburg 


.33 


Shelby 


Shelbyville 


.26 


Spencer 


Rockport.. . 


.43 


Starke 




.40 


Steuben 


Angola . . 


.42 


St. Joseph 


South Bend . . ... 


.42 




Sullivan 


.42 


Switzerland 


Vevay 


.38 


Tippecanoe 

Tipton 

Union 


Lafayette 

Tipton 

Liberty 


.33 
.29 

35 






.32 


Vermillion 

Vigo 


Newport 

Terre Haute 


.40 
.35 


Wabash 

Warren 


Wabash 

Williamsport 


.34 

.38 


Warrick 


Boonville 


.41 




Salem 


.33 


Wayne 

Wells 


Richmond 

Bluffton 


.33 
.41 


White 


Monticello 


.38 


Whitley .. 


Columbia City 


.30 






Totals 


$97,587,355 37 


$2,047,611,172 GO 










.47 


.35 













860 



Year Book 



LIBRARIES. 



COUN'l'lES 


TOWNS 


No. of 

Volumes in 

School 

Libraries 


No. of 
Books 
Added Dur- 
ing Year 


No. Young 

People 

Reading 

Circle Books 

Added- 

1917-1918 


Amount 

Paid Teachers 

for Attending 

Institutes 


Adams 


Decatur 


14,512 

102,327 

11,777 

4,955 

6,426 

12,638 
4,300 
16,799 
30,918 
15,000 


776 
11,508 
204 
211 
640 

420 
700 
784 
475 
440 


126 

730 

116 

81 

96 

200 
645 
367 
517 
3,390 


$3 202 47 


Allen 


Ft. Wayne 


4,134 36 


Bartholomew 


Cnl\i^hiis 


2 220 61 


Benton 


Fowler 


3,283 27 


Blackford 


Hartford City 


1 197 90 


Boone 


Lebanon 


4,297 74 




Nashville 


1,384 12 


Carroll 


Delphi 


2 883 81 


Cass 




7,208 89 


Clark 


Jeffersonville . 


2,060 75 


Clay 


Brazil 


2,484 60 


Clinton 


Frankfort 


18,212 


1,794 


152 


5,568 75 


Crawford 


English 


1,092 47 






2,535 
19,044 

13,854 
10,062 
59,080 
4,097 
42,672 

12,985 

6,066 

12,106 

20,797 

5,019 

9,802 

21,883 

8,406 

5,412 

950 


47 
320 

899 
469 

1,814 
238 

1,135 

689 
75 
437 
634 
346 

428 

191 

1,453 

165 

30 


100 
453 

418 
302 
150 
216 
409 

226 


2,400 65 


Dearborn 


Lawrenceburg . 


3,141 19 


Decatur 




2,622 35 


Dekalb 




1,889 02 


Delaware 


Muncie 


4,276 01 






1,898 30 


Elkhart 


Goshen 


3,197 94 


Fayette 




3,160 33 


Flovd 


New Albany 


772 66 






121 

967 
120 

260 
28 

192 
50 
24 


2,470 55 


Franklin 


Brookville 


1,973 27 


Fulton 


Rochester 


3,412 08 


Gibson 




3,252 34 


Grant 


Marion.... 

Bloomfield 


3,718 17 


Greene 


4,425 23 




Noblesville 


2,980 45 


Hancock 


Greenfield 


2,620 39 






2,443 64 


Hendricks 


Danville. . 


12,391 
9,296 
11,615 
13,814 

9,743 
19,637 

9,916 
14,053 
15,522 

5,548 
21,991 
20,838 

6,591 
106,276 

62,644 

4,818 

7,000 

236,523 

23,248 

1,441 

13,433 

6,668 

106,475 

9,699 

16,413 

19,840 

1,745 

2,328 

5,700 


377 

729 

813 

1,540 

843 

1,200 

366 

90 

965 

215 

1,309 

496 

330 

9,254 

877 

444 

8 

9,973 

429 

201 
2,189 

309 
3,172 
3,130 

480 
403 


144 

162 

483 

1,466 

278 

386 

52 


3,759 10 






3,015 32 






2,850 58 






3,015 86 






2,715 38 


Jasper. . 


Rensselaer 


2,406 22 


Jay 


Portland 


2,168 11 


Jefferson 


Madison . . 


1,722 97 






1,025 

44 

876 

464 

3 

560 


1.968 05 




Franklin 


2,217 31 


Knox 


Vincennes . 


4,955 94 




Warsaw 


4,450 90 


Lagrange . 


Lagrange 


2,747 79 


Lake 




2,633 90 






4,877 02 


Lawrence 


Bedford 




4,360 00 


Madison 


Anderson 




9 200 78 


Marion 


Indianapolis 

Plymouth 


645 
92 

24 
176 
658 

76 


5,490 50 


Marshall 


3,905 16 


Martin .... 


Shoals 


1,308 86 




Peru 


2,988 62 


Monroe 


B loomington 


4,662 40 




Crawfordsville 

Martinsville 


4,521 92 


Morgan 


4,025 43 


Newton 


Kentland 


304 


1,297 49 


Noble 


Albion 


3,060 95 


Ohio 




96 
136 
83 


284 18 


Orange . . . 


Paoli 


358 
603 


1,517 58 


Owen 


Spencer , 


1,526 30 



Department Public Instruction 

LIBRARIES— Continued . 



361 



\ 



COUNTIES 


TOWNS 


No. of 
Volumes in 

School 
Libraries 


No. of 
Books 
Added Dur- 
ing Year 


No. Young 

People 

Reading 

Circle Books 

Added- 

1917-1918 


Amount 

Paid Teachers 

for Attending 

Institutes 


Parke 


Rockville 


13,211 
12,429 

1.894 
20,329 

5,080 

17,658 

4,733 

21,137 

7,100 
8,025 

1,750 
10,687 

5,888 
13,772 

1,817 

32,790 

17,349 

2,295 

39,576 

350 

11,362 


714 

837 

353 

1,151 

525 

961 
629 

1,043 
613 

1,110 

135 
617 
667 
687 


177 

1,035 

15 

408 
60 


$3,223 35 
1 693 29 


Perry 


Cannelton 


pS,:::;:::::::::::: 


Petersburg 


2,029 21 
5 510 36 


Porter 




Posey 


Mt. Vernon 


2 617 41 


Pulaski 


Winamac 


2,310 10 
2 665 74 


Putnam 




298 
533 
356 

284 

360 
471 
625 

207 


Randolph 


Winchester 


2 377 89 


Ripley 




2,330 01 
4,094 66 

625 71 


Rush 


Rushville 


Scott 


Scottsburg 


Shelby 


Shelbyville 


2,698 46 




Rockport 


2 905 97 


Starke 




1,754 57 


Steuben 




1,634 57 


St. Joseph . . . 


South Bend . . . 


1,441 

1,308 

50 

1,942 

140 

1,053 


448 
2,139 


3 567 67 






1,769 32 


Switzerland 


Vevay 


1,083 58 


Tippecanoe 


Lafayette 


69 


8,111 61 


Tipton . 


Tipton 


2,588 85 
1 223 16 


Union ... 


Liberty 


530 


Vanderburgh 


Evansville 


1 748 15 






6,123 

18,882 

22,314 
7,638 
1,118 
1,794 

60,203 
10,538 
6,306 
16,485 


648 
4,256 

415 

367 

265 

39 

2,996 
371 
217 

928 


6 
3.108 


3,451 91 


Vigo 


Terre Haute 


5,874 33 
4,184 12 


Wabash 


Wabash 


Warren 


Williamsport 


• 214 
334 

82 

845 
765 
102 
259 


2,170 43 


Warrick 


Boonville 


2 294 09 




Salem 


1,886 91 
8,353 34 


Wayne 




Wells.....: 


Bluffton . . 


3 892 95 


White 




2,822 81 


Whitley 


Columbia City 


2 075 99 






Total . . . 


1,689,473 


94,903 


32,419 


$280 899 45 









862 



Year Book 



TEANSFERS AND TRANSPORTATION. 



COUNTIES 


TOWNS 


Amount of 

Township Fund 

Used to Pay 

Transfers 


Amount Paid 
Trustees or 

School 

Boards for 

Managing 

Educational 

Matters 


Total 
Number of 

Children 
Transported 
at Township 

Expense 


Total Amount 

Expended by 

Township 

Trustees for 

Transportation 

During 

1917-1918 


Adams 


Decatur 


$1,280 16 
1,435 42 
1,134 49 
1,421 28 
2,249 78 

2,829 25 


$637 50 

782 00 

3,840 54 

150 00 

310 00 

330 00 
2,500 00 

150 00 
3, 690 00 

835 00 

742 80 

2,545 00 

1,468 68 

436 00 

528 00 

820 50 
761 19 
460 00 
277 00 
838 75 

186 00 
1,341 00 
1,050 00 

113 00 
6,062 71 

500 00 
1,312 75 
630 00 
720 00 
210 00 

4,118 00 
150 00 

3,879 00 
350 00 
175 00 

390 00 
275 00 
518 00 
600 00 
2,865 00 

335 00 
3,030 00 
1,916 25 

515 00 
5,192 00 

1,200 00 

240 00 

1,100 00 

2,635 00 

205 00 

153 00 

556 00 

300 00 

1,115 00 

2,295 00 

455 00 
150 00 
120 00 
579 25 
2,225 00 


66 
427 
634 
700 
162 

1,021 

2 

754 

638 

206 

246 
1,108 


$1,684 70 
8,792 92 


Allen 


Ft. Wayne 


Bartholomew 


Columbus 


13 061 55 


Benton 


Fowler 


20,532 81 


Blackford 


Hartford City 


4,238 12 


Boone 


Lebanon 


22 314 52 




Nashville 


57 00 


Carroll 


Delphi. 


2,567 48 
672 00 


18,265 07 


Cass 




15,299 25 


Clark 


Jeffersonville 


3,350 00 


Clay 


Brazil 


200 49 
5,370 20 


4,893 60 




Frankfort 


30,667 12 


Crawford 


English 




Daviess 




493 86 
802 73 

7,462 21 
1,339 85 
11,382 41 
1,143 24 
5,306 78 

1,120 00 
809 95 

1,448 87 
686 41 

2,398 55 

839 54* 
6,204 15 

543 37 
6,577 31 
1,971 49 

523 77 

2,211 90 

5,592 32 

655 83 

153 90 

623 00 
2,781 02 
1,106 60 
1,513 79 

144 00 

6,899 58 

50 63 

1,750 62 

423 00 

1,804 57 

3,652 89 
1,664 41 
3,009 59 
657 74 
2,687 61 

729 20 
3,153 93 
3,781 93 
3,840 42 
2,160 18 

974 95 
2,905 48 


836 
123 

722 
303 
235 


15,043 63 


Dearborn 


Lawrenceburg 


3,137 70 


Decatiir 


Greensburg 


19,347 95 


Dekalb 


6,422 77 


Delaware 


Muncie 


40,723 66 


Dubois 


Jasper 




Elkhart 


Goshen 


874 

522 
128 
1,261 
358 
717 

746 
513 
300 
936 
737 

10 

1,581 

1,238 

1,219 

164 

357 
583 
440 
537 
89 

840 

1,548 

1,770 

825 

920 

904 
271 
307 
2,790 
614- 

19 

1,021 

48 

1,929 

256 

265 
699 
10 
260 
178 


16,397 56 


Fayette 


Connersville 


12,068 00 


Floyd 




1,837 11 


Fountain 


Covington 


30,926 61 




Brookville 


12,297 84 


Fulton 


Rochester. . . 


16,345 98 


Gibson 


Princeton 


12,240 00 


Grant 


Marion 


11,449 23 


Greene 


Bloomfield... 


5,191 52 




Noblesville 


22,604 08 




Greenfield . . 


18,163 14 


Harrison 


Corydon 


126 00 




Danville : . . . . 


39,991 61 


Henry 


Newcastle. . . . 


27,114 23 






25,403 87 


Huntington 


Huntington 


4,067 11 


Jackson 


Brownstown .... 


8,706 84 




Rensselaer 


18,319 22 


Jay . 


Portland 


8,359 35 






6,923 85 


Jennings 


Vernon 


1,322 25 




FrankUn 


15,156 65 


Knox 


Vincennes 


27,568 33 


Kosciusko 


Warsaw 


38,283 87 


Laffranffe 


Lagrange 


17,971 48 


like .::::.:: 


Crown Point . . . 


28,665 16 




Laporte 


21,175 60 


Lawrence 


Bedford 


4,822 60 






11,454 81 




Indianapolis 


27,593 91 


Marshall 




12,858 36 


Martin 


Shoals 


402 55 




Peru 


7,226 81 




Bloomington 


500 94 


Montgomery 


Crawfordsville 

Martinsville 


40,583 15 




7,212 86 


Newton 


Kentland 


9,516 20 


Noble 


Albion 


19,103 65 


Ohio 


Rising Sun . . . 


340 60 


Orange 


Paoli ... 


938 29 
974 28 


4,412 45 


Owen 


Spencer 


3,413 43 



Department Public Instruction 



863 



TRANSFERS AND TRANSPORTATION — Continued. 



COUNTIES 



TOWNS 



^Amount of 

Township Fund 

Used to Pay 

Transfers 



Amount Paid 
Trustees or 

School 

Boards for 

Managing 

Educational 

Matters 



Total 

Number o 

Children 

Transported 

at Township 

Expense 



I'otal Amount 
;Expended byn. 

Township '/^ 
'^ Trustees for 
I'ransportation 
During 

1917-1918 



Parke. 
Perry. 
Pike.. 
Porter . 
Posey . 



Pulaski . . . 
Putnam. . 
Randolph . 
Ripley . . . 
Rush 



Scott. . . 
Shelby.. 
Spencer. 
Starke. . 
Steuben. 



St. Joseph. . 

Sullivan 

Switzerland . 
Tippecanoe. 
Tipton 



Union 

Vanderburgh. 
Vermillion . . . 
Vigo 



Wabash. 
Warren . 
Warrick . 



Wayne.. 
Wells... 
White .. 
Whitley. 



Rockville . . . 
Cannelton . . 
Petersburg.. 
Valparaiso . . 
Mt. Vernon. 



Winamac . . . 
Greencastle . 
Winchester . 
Versailles . . . 
Rushville . . . 



Scottsburg . 
Shelby ville. 
Rockport.. 

Knox 

Angela 



South Bend . 
Sullivan .... 

Vevay 

Lafayette... 
Tipton 



Liberty 

Evansville.. . 

Newport 

Terre Haute . 



Wabash 

WiUiamsport . 
Boonville 



Richmond 

Bluffton 

Monticello 

Columbia City . 



317 51 

657 95 

1,242 55 

2,014 65 

2.256 11 



1,142 30 
1,046 42 
6,068 18 
1,060 95 

612 00 
2,440 27 
1,966 15 
1,144 00 
3,089 55 

8,692 83 
616 34 
2,522 97 
3,893 82 
1,500 00 



1,116 49 



2,922 06 

1,869 49 

794 22 

3,709 55 

3,121 80 

1,611 31 

3,449 58 

1,817 64 

604 52 



120 00 
396 00 
150 00 
300 00 
6,938 00 

5,090 00 

592 70 

4,325 00 

429 00 

430 00 

15 00 
•702 00 
250 00 

75 00 
385 00 

2,030 00 
461 00 
130 00 

1,050 00 
300 00 

170 00 
1,200 00 

372 00 
2,800 00 

1,713 00 

3,055 00 

155 00 

604 00 

685 00 
225 00 
130 00 
300 00 



713 
5 

36 
552 
344 

396 
868 

3,051 
132 

1,310 

153 
648 
129 
605 
312 

437 

1,041 

23 

1,971 

490 

305 
119 
679 
661 

1,565 
442 
128 
133 

1,215 
354 
928 
347 



$16,867 30 

174 00 

762 00 

18,624 20 

8,052 23 

9, 142 82 
22, 166 73 
44,076 25 

2,502 20 
29,247 92 

3,215 75 
13,771 95 

2,701 46 
11,849 05 
10, 630 57 

11,160 39 

18,036 90 

557 00 

45,835 86 

8,860 40 

7,322 13 
3,823 86 
12,826 75 
10, 224 48 

48,427 00 

13,744 98 

1,561 68 

2,356 87 

3,168 17 

7,658 61 

28,268 35 

7,889 01 



Totals. 



$192,547 59 



$107,442 62 



$57,059 



$1,251,460 05 



864 



Year Book 



TUITION AND SPECIAL REVENUES — INDEBTEDNESS. 



COUNTIES 



TOWNS 



Tuition 

Expended for 

Teaching 



Tuition 

Expended for 

Transfers 



Special 

School 

Expended 



Indebtedness 



Adams 

AUen 

Bartholomew 

Benton 

Blackford . . . 
Boone 

Brown 

Carroll 

Cass 

Clark 

Clay 

Clinton 

Crawford . . . . 

Daviess 

Dearborn — 

Decatur 

Dekalb 

Delaware . . . . 

Dubois 

Elkhart 

Fayette 

Floyd 

Fountain — 
Franklin . . . . 
Fulton 

Gibson 

Grant 

Greene 

Hamilton 

Hancock 

Harrison. ., 
Hendricks . . , 

Henry 

Howard 

Huntington . 

Jackson 

Jasper 

Jay 

Jefferson ... 
Jennings. . . 

Johnson .... 

Knox 

Kosciusko . . 
Lagrange — 
Lake 

Laporte 

Lawrence — 
Madison ... 

Marion 

Marshall . . . 

Martin 

Miami 

Monroe .... 
Montgomery 
Morgan . . . , 

Newton 

Noble 

Ohio 

Orange 

Owen 



Decatur 

Ft. Wayne.... 
Columbus .... 

Fowler 

Hartford City . 
Lebanon 

Nashville 

Delphi 

Logansport . . . 
Jeff ersonville . . 

Brazil 

Frankfort 

English 

Washington . . . 
Lawrenceburg . 

Greensburg. . . 

Auburn 

Muncie 

Jasper 

Goshen 

Connersville . . 
New Albany . . 
Covington . . . . 
Brookville .... 
Rochester .... 

Princeton 

Marion 

Bloomfield 

Noblesville. . . 
Greenfield .... 

Corydon 

Danville 

Newcastle . . . . 

Kokomo 

Huntington . . . 

Brownstown . . 

Rensselaer 

Portland 

Madison 

Vernon 

Franklin 

Vincennes .... 

Warsaw 

Lagrange 

Crown Point . . 

Laporte 

Bedford 

Anderson 

Indianapolis. . 
Plymouth . . . . 

Shoals 

Peru.. 

Bloomington . . 
Crawfordsville 
Martinsville. . 

Kentland 

Albion 

Rising Sun. . . 

Paoli 

Sp§ficer,,,., , 



$81,109 99 
404,039 94 
100, 189 55 
85,635 47 
58,260 88 
108,185 95 

32,193 10 
79,793 35 
166,074 63 
94,560 37 

115,643 50 
126,692 38 
43,576 87 
100,749 61 

72.050 30 

93.374 84 
95,419 32 

252,472 

67.051 97 
210,521 01 

68,367 74 
105,203 71 
76,984 59 
52,584 05 
87,046 48 

123,732 23 
196,741 65 
135,253 74 
115,929 14 
81,871 18 

80.375 38 
98,569 72 

127,873 21 
138,038 58 
131,099 24 

92,789 35 
64,529 52 
92,132 59 
66,809 09 
54,782 82 

87,463 17 
182,070 
123,471 45 

68,808 61 
604,675 64 

203,972 18 
114,894 01 
249,495 92 
315,808 82 
103,290 87 

41,796 26 
119,189 55 

94,768 81 
154,700 51 

99,710 44 

56,153 73 
97,264 57 
14,145 39 
68,885 18 
46,388 72 



$3,370 45 
11,016 25 
6,134 92 
3,379 78 
3,804 85 
11,501 24 



6,937 12 
5,476 78 
4,375 62 

11,953 49 
5,582 12 
881 00 
4,616 74 
5,389 13 

2,515 26 
10,998 66 
8,761 04 
4,851 14 
10,430 04 

3,933 18 
2,981 54 
4,771 07 
3,550 87 
1,287 15 

4, 386 54 
9,926 84 
6,096 90 
7,653 36 
815 47 

384 00 
4,552 61 
2,304 59 
9,349 63 
5,731 94 

4,855 70 
10,027 71 
8,183 02 
1,928 48 
3,157 80 

6,746 60 
3,164 67 
7,260 23 
2,578 32 
2,806 44 

8,236 27 
7,691 10 
10,829 94 
6,155 60 
7,468 73 



5,270 20 
1,032 94 
4,919 97 
7,368 05 

7,554 45 
10,170 00 
1,921 12 
1,104 41 
1,940 77 



$234,071 09 
342,505 12 

76,358 59 
145,602 12 

89,434 20 
120,276 40 

13,590 85 
116,191 43 
164,079 96 

71,040 48 

93,579 90 
149,429 88 

16,013 07 
118,296 33 

47,740 30 

102,398 58 
146,763 06 
375,457 24 
30,542 20 
260, 378 42 

83,063 13 
61,177 14 

113,650 84 
37,791 63 

154,310 53 

142,613 72 
237,930 37 
116,928 33 
175,306 26 
132,365 51 

36,375 61 
158,185 22 
203,952 16 
252,244 67 
207,015 73 

91,099 65 
89,836 37 
82,247 18 
45,639 29 
35,193 19 

114,516 38 
182,942 68 
173,145 56 
95,035 78 
1,134,594 

267,643 01 
168,634 23 
249,632 03 
2,572,949 98 
218,033 81 

18,400 43 
222,558 48 

96,738 50 
316,066 38 
110,397 50 

109,793 36 
187,597 56 
6,800 91 
60,851 32 
54,525 89 



$193,003 00 
738, 980 00 
35,131 00 
61,600 00 
84,900 00 
168,400 00 

4,646 00 
105,637 00 
304,393 00 
42,500 00 

177,945 00 
110,800 00 

10,994 00 
110,089 00 

23,700 00 

121,843 00 
58,969 00 

504,305 00 
25, 143 00 
82,710 00 

99,980 00 
66, 100 00 

189,560 00 
37,990 00 

195,080 00 

190, 600 00 

247,330 00 

61,400 00 

83,928 00 

117,534 00 

44,746 00 

147,465 00 

287,255 00 

299,348 00 

307,884 00 

104,357 00 
79,320 00 
95,650 00 
50,770 00 
31,800 00 

122,120 00 

408,605 00 

91,100 00 

80,620 00 

1,049,899 00 

458,628 00 
140,682 00 
250,800 00 
2,775,699 00 
147,878 00 

2,910 00 
173,340 00 
113,500 00 
307,149 00 
109,672 00 

8,213 00 
170,190 00 

3,500 00 
49.475 00 
48»661 QO 



Department Public Instruction 

TUITION AND SPECIAL REVENUES — INDEBTEDNESS — Continued. 



COUNTIES 



TOWNS 



Tuition 

Expended for 

Teaching 



Tuition 

Expended for 

Transfers 



Special 

School 

Expended 



Indebtedness 



Parke. 
Perry. . 
Pike. . . 
Porter. 
Posey., 



Pulaski... 
Putnam. . 
Randolph . 
Ripley . . . 
Rush 



Scott. . . 
Shelby.. 
Spencer . 
Starke. . 
Steuben. 



St. Joseph. . 

Sullivan 

Switzerland. 
Tippecanoe. 
Tipton 



Union 

Vanderburgh. 
Vermillion.. . 
Vigo 



Warren. . . . 
Warrick.. . 
Washington . 

Wayne 



White... 
Whitley. 



Rockville... 
Cannelton. . 
Petersburg . . 
Valparaiso . . 
Mt. Vernon . 

Winamac . . . 
Greencastle . 
Winchester . 
Versailles... 
Rushville . . . 



Scottsburg . 
Shelbyville. 
Rockport . . 

Knox 

Angola — 



South Bend. 

Sullivan 

Vevay 

Lafayette... 
Tipton 



Liberty ...... 

Evansville.. . 

Newport 

Terre Haute. 



Wabash 

Williamsport. 

Boonville 

Salem 



Richmond 

Bluffton 

Monticello 

Columbia City. 



$81,444 63 

69,141 

59,564 89 

113,905 66 

93,525 79 

63,882 86 
100,687 14 
123,113 54 
61,095 07 
83,547 45 

25,511 30 
113,029 13 
74,945 21 
53,353 90 
60,304 73 

472,192 44 
129,678 74 

33,751 74 
203,476 51 

65,657 49 

33,958 17 
342,332 98 
112,148 84 
449,199 54 

128,567 38 
51,621 91 
86,948 36 
70,553 47 

178,410 81 
86,369 46 
85,825 32 
73,306 76 



$4,702 08 



1,470 45 
3,155 55 
10,842 32 

2,194 20 
5,928 63 
5,745 14 
4,642 89 
4,975 51 

1,209 49 
5,038 82 
4,045 00 
20,080 13 
8,205 22 

3,298 86 
9,723 22 
388 56 
4,627 15 
6,585 78 

56 00 
2,541 32 
4,559 68 
1,570 19 

2,486 80 
5,383 45 
2,950 87 
3,101 09 

10,951 30 
6,476 68 
9,320 78 
5,488 84 



$110,677 64 
23,054 25 
45,035 30 
147,393 31 
71,820 74 

68,628 83 
216,161 11 
241,681 17 

46,334 92 
215,644 88 

21.677 09 
149,695 02 

41,422 68 
65,285 64 
86,305 92 

636,238 12 
116,147 57 

24,353 08 
292,865 25 

84,702 78 

40.678 47 
287,911 04 
120,254 31 
400,640 67 

192,291 90 
94,552 16 
39,912 99 
57,157 17 

268,179 59 
78,562 19 
99,866 40 
91,076 55 



$87,210 00 
20,050 00 
34,688 00 
80,577 00 
53,383 00 

80,500 00 
14,645 00 

264,837 00 
28,335 00 

211,215 00 

20,675 00 

240,240 00 

25,021 00 

75,535 00 

75,093 00 

765,800 00 

205,023 00 

9,320 00 

326,634 00 

90,198 00 

25,600 00 

557,297 00 

170,194 00 

1,004,476 00 

231,338 00 
14,375 00 

117,846 00 
27,295 00 

193,650 00 
37,500 00 
98,568 00 
76,600 00 



Totals. 



$11,006,317 55 



$465,820 59 



$16,006,742 50 



$7,480,054 00 



366 



Year Book 



COST OF INSTRUCTION. 



COUNTIES 



Adams 

Allen 

Bartholomew 

Benton 

Blackford . . . 

Boone 

Brown 

Carroll 

Cass 

Clark 

Clay 

Clinton 

Crawford 

Daviess 

Dearborn 

Decatur 

Dekalb 

Delaware — 

Dubois 

Elkhart 

Fayette 

Floyd.. 

Fountain 

Franklin . . . . 
Fulton 

Gibson 

Grant 

Greene.. . . . . 

Hamilton 

Hancock . . . . 

Harrison 

Hendricks. . . 

Henry 

Howard 

Huntington.. 

Jackson 

Jasper 

Jay 

Jefferson 

Jennings 

Johnson 

Knox 

Kosciusko . . . 
Lagrange — 
Lake 

Laporte 

Lawrence 

Madison . . . . 

Marion 

Marshall 

Martin 

Miami 

Monroe 

Montgomery 
Morgan 

Newton 

Noble 

Chi© 

Orange 

Owen 



TOWNS 



Decatxir 

Ft. Wayne.... 
Columbus .... 

Fowler 

Hartford City. 



Lebanon .... 
Nashville... . 

Delphi 

Logansport. . 
Jeff ersonville . 



Brazil 

Frankfort 

English 

Washington... 
Lawrenceburg. 



Greensburg. 

Auburn 

Muncie. . . . 

Jasper 

Goshen 



Connersville . 
New Albany . 
Covington.. . 
Brookville . . . 
Rochester. . . 



Princeton.. 

Marion 

Bloomfield. 
Noblesville . 
Greenfield . , 



Corydon 

Danville 

Newcastle . . . 

Kokomo 

Huntington . . 

Brownstown . 



Portland . 
Madison . 
Vernon.. 



FrankUn. . 
Vincennes . 



Lagrange 

Crown Point. 



Laporte 

Bedford 

Anderson . . . . 
Indianapolis . 
Plymouth . . . 



Peru 

Bloomington . . 
Crawfordsville . 
Martinsville. . . 



Kentland . . 
Albion .... 
Rising Sun . 

Paoli 

Spencer. . . 



Amount Paid 

Teachers 

Elementary 

Schools 



$60,432 52 

324,325 90 

73,738 67 

54,102 35 

47.205 85 

74,165 33 
28,378 96 
53,495 97 
112,188 41 
76,481 20 

83,898 21 
85,570 83 
31,631 12 
71,791 73 
60,613 56 

62,576 43 

72.206 04 
198,318 03 

53,630 57 
158,510 59 

48,671 42 
71,528 
61,277 38 
46,010 35 
52,404 23 

95,967 90 
144,270 06 
107,213 40 
78,426 81 
52,934 27 

62,410 89 
57,718 59 
94,033 43 
103,208 73 
85,453 50 

67,248 63 
55,260 00 
67,642 83 
54,099 73 
39,253 63 

61,042 91 
130,364 48 
85,377 74 
45,401 60 
459,195 82 

137,864 87 

91,756 78 

193,181 91 

1,034,571 12 

73,445 98 

35,014 84 
87,906 40 
79,800 42 
101,773 38 
68,877 63 

46,902 24 
73,095 76 
11,467 15 
52,665 77 
39,799 15 



Amount Paid 

for Apparatus, 

Books, Etc., 

Elementary 

Schools 



$26,781 88 
116,788 77 
38,236 64 
42,568 48 
23, 617 76 

49,395 37 
5,351 50 
46,161 12 
60, 643 78 
25,813 98 

28.613 56 
61,381 45 

6,236 04 
42,977 24 
21,728 67 

37,024 74 
36,908 48 
92,888 69 
8,901 97 
110,746 81 

37,479 10 
34,572 12 
47,251 31 
21,459 60 
46,362 67 

36,812 96 
70,019 04 
35,724 20 
47,910 77 
34,083 71 

9,039 57 
55,101 57 
52,870 44 
63,566 80 
40,549 77 

32,884 13 
39,791 58 
32,994 05 
21,255 16 
14,417 09 

35,148 12 
56,488 96 
82,119 13 
37,509 39 
209,791 54 

84,450 85 

22.614 92 

70.323 97 
346,621 

40,499 

6,218 43 

60.324 02 
22,894 10 
72,578 63 
24,685 47 

29,772 25 
47,894 42 
3,043 21 
12,640 37 
11,304 76 



Cost of 

Maintenance, 

Elementary 

Schools 



$87,214 40 

441,114 67 

111,975 31 

96,670 83 

70,823 61 

123,560 70 
33,730 46 
99,657 09 
172,832 19 
102,295 18 

112,511 77 
146,952 28 

37,867 16 
114,768 97 

82,342 23 

99,601 17 
109,114 52 
291,206 72 

62,532 54 
269,257 40 

86, 150 52 
106,100 50 
108,528 69 
67,469 95 
98, 766 90 

132,780 86 
214,289 10 
142,937 60 
126,337 58 
87,017 98 

71,450 46 
112,820 16 
146,903 87 
166,775 53 
126,003 27 

100,132 76 
95,051 58 

100,636 
75,354 
53,670 72 

96,191 03 
186,853 44 
167,496 87 

82,910 99 
668,987 36 

222,315 72 
114,371 70 
263,505 88 
1,381,193 11 
113,945 03 

41,233 27 
148,230 42 
102,694 52 
174,352 01 

93,563 10 

76,674 49 
120,990 18 
14,510 36 
65,306 14 
51,103 91 



Average 

Cost Per 

Pupil, 

Elementary 

Schools 



Department Public Instruction 

COST OF INSTRUCTION— Continued. 



867 



COUNTIES 


TOWNS 


Amount Paid 

Teachers 

Elementary 

Schools 


Amount Paid 

for Apparatus, 

Books, Etc., 

Elementary 

Schools 


Cost of 

Maintenance, 

Elementary 

Schools 


Average 

Cost Per 

Pupil, 

Elementary 

Schools 


Parke 


Rockville 


3^7,933 77 
50,527 06 
45,224 54 
89, 164 89 
67,692 94 

46,259 50 
63,452 40 
82, 136 78 
46,834 71 
68,405 27 

20,611 30 
84,290 17 
57, 182 53 
40,892 75 
40,265 75 

383,658 05 
86,864 93 
27,319 29 

128,843 74 
43,210 32 

18,103 50 
321,372 64 

91,669 02 
379,538 51 

90,777 35 
40, 167 96 
65,082 03 
52,021 51 

151,833 25 
66,541 50 
63,227 97 
50,462 53 


$33,134 34 
6,873 55 
12,398 06 

58.220 91 
26,661 90 

7,951 22 

43.075 73 

56.221 41 
16,004 77 
65,860 84 

9,510 22 
45,848 50 
18,253 49 
21,570 43 

23.076 94 

136,949 57 
68,812 21 
5,575 47 

100,390 56 
26,598 81 

15,451 41 
79,997 31 
57,914 97 
148,558 50 

76,333 48 
27, 562. 00 
19,348 88 
14,079 57 

86,811 58 
23,214 61 
45,732 43 
30,418 64 


$91,068 11 
57,400 61 
57,622 60 

147,385 80 
94,354 84 

54,210 72 
106,528 13 
138,358 19 

62,839 48 
134,266 11 

30,121 52 
130,138 67 
75,436 02 
62,463 18 
63,342 69 

520,607 62 
155,677 14 

32,894 76 
229,234 30 

69,809 13 

33,554 91 
401,369 95 
149,583 99 
528,097 01 

167, 110 83 
67,729 96 
84,430 91 
66,101 08 

238,644 83 
89,756 11 

108,960 40 
80,881 17 


$26 36 


Perry 


Cannelton 


19 00 


Pike 


14 56 


Porter 


Valparaiso 


40 27 


Posey 


Mt. Vernon 


26 93 


Pulaski 




20 54 


Putnam . ... 


Greencastle 


28 81 


Randolph 


Winchester 


24 64 


Riplev 


Versailles 


19 11 


Rush 


Rushville 


40 46 


Scott 




14 57 


Shelby . 


Shelbyville 


27 64 


Spencer 

Starke 


Rockport 

Knox 

Angola 


18 82 
25 98 


Steuben 


26 83 


St. Joseph 


South Bend 


31 99 


Sullivan 


Sullivan 


22 39 






18 35 


Tippecanoe 


Lafayette 


39 99 


Tipton 


Tipton 


22 59 


Union 


Liberty 


41 22 


Vanderburgh 


Evansville 


30 09 


Vermillion . . -. 


Newport 


23 38 


Vigo 


Terre Haute 


23 17 


Wabash. 


Wabash 


35 36 


Warren 


35 55 


Warrick 


Boonville 


16 52 


Washington 


Salem 


24 50 


Wayne 


Richmond 


30 25 


Wells 

White 


Bluffton. 

Monticello 


22 26 
28 35 


Whitley 


Columbia City 


26 56 






Totals 


$9,059,370 84 


$4,342,248 46 


$13,401,619 30 




Average 




26 31 















868 



Year Book 



COST OF INSTRUCTION. 



COUNTIES 


TOWN 


Amount Paid 

Teachers 
Non-Certified 
High Schools 


Amount Paid for 

Apparatus, 

Books, etc., 

Non-Certified 

High Schools 


Cost Mainten- 
ance 
Non-Certified 
High Schools 


Average Cost 

per Pupil, 
Non-Certified 
High Schools 




Decatur 


$797 OCI 




$797 00 


$99 62 


Allen 


Ft. Wayne 






Bartholomew 

Benton 


Columbus 

Fowler 


1,551 50 


$494 90 


2,046 40 


68 21 


Blackford 


Hartford City ..... 






1 






1,384 25 


339 00 


1,723 25 


71 80 


Brown 


Nashville 




Carroll 


Delphi 


2,264 00 


2,203 52 


4,467 52 


95 05 


Cass 






Clark 


Jeffersonville 






1 


Clay 


Brazil 










Clinton 


Frankfort 

English 


1,800 00 
505 75 

1,550 00 
560 00 

960 00 

1,140 00 

1,689 00 

465 00 

720 00 

1,695 00 


249 00 

106 13 

306 55 

75 00 

400 00 

316 95 

650 00 

34 00 

92 00 

725 83 


2,049 00 
611 88 

1,856 55 
635 00 

1,360 00 

1,456 95 

2,339 00 

499 00 

812 00 

2,420 83 


70 65 


Crawford 


122 37 


Daviess 


Washington 

Lawrenceburg 

Greensburg 


53 97 


Dearborn 


42 33 


Decatur . • 


50 37 


Dekalb 


45 53 


Delaware . . 


Muncie . . . . 


70 85 






55 44 


Elkhart 


Goshen 


38 67 


Fayette 


Connersville 


105 25 


Floyd 




Fountain .... 


Covington 

Brookville 

Rochester 


700 00 
2,445 40 


212 00 
781 48 


912 00 
3,226 88 


76 00 




68 66 


Fulton 




Gibson 




1,235 00 


. 258 25 


1,493 25 


94 80 


Grant 






Greene 


Bloomfield 












Noblesville 










Hancock 


Greenfield 


4,145 00 
765 00 


1,050 98 
35 00 


5,195 98 
800 00 


91 15 




66 66 


Hendricks 


Danville 




Henry 


Newcastle 

Kokomo 


1,581 50 


130 12 


1,711 62 


81 18 


Howard 




Huntington 

Jackson 












Brownstown 

Rensselaer 

Portland 


2,752 46 

1,200 00 

658 00 

630 00 

4,459 20 


357 99 
563 20 
200 00 
350 00 
569 64 


3,110 45 

1,763 20 

858 00 

980 00 

5,028 84 


91 48 




58 77 


Jay 


47 66 


Jefferson 


Madison 


46 67 


Jennings 


Vernon 


50 29 




Franklin 




Knox 


Vincennes 

Warsaw 


1,407 83 


467 10 


1,937 93 


48 44 






LaBTanse 


Lagrange 


3,488 66 
4,200 25 

6.088 44 


956 41 
1,559 17 

2,410 42 


4,444 4i 
5,759 42 

8.498.86 


47 03 


Lake .......... 


Crown Point 


117 53 




97 56 


Lawrence 


Bedford 
















Marion 


Indianapolis 

Plymouth 

Shoals 


3,411 67 
1,497 25 


1,018 30 
800 02 


4,429 97 
2,297 27 


79 10 


Marshall 


91 89 


Martin 






Peru 


1,530 75 
1,440 00 


380 07 
219 00 


1,910 82 
1,659 00 


61 63 




Bloomington 

Crawfordsville 


127 61 


Montgomery 






Martinsville 

Kentland 


1,580 00 
1,520 00 


315 00 
388 99 


1,895 00 
1,908 99 


65 34 


Newton 


112 29 


Noble 






Ohio . . . 


Rising Sun . . . . 












Paoli 










Owen 


Spencer 


2,910 80 


i,i89 83 


4,100 63 


53 96 



Department Public Instruction 

COST OF INSTRUCTION — Continued. 



369 



COUNTY 


TOWN 


Amount Paid 

Teachers 
Non-Certified 
High Schools 


Amount Paid for 

Apparatus, 

Books, etc., 

Non-Certified 

Hign Schools 


Cost Mainten- 
ance 
Non-Certified 
High Schools 


Average Cost 

per Pupil, 
Non-Certified 
High Schools 


Parke 


Rockville 










Perry 












Pike.. . 


Petersburg 










Porter 


Valparaiso 

Mt. Vernon 

Winamac 

Greencastle 

Winchester 

Versailles 

Rushville 


$2,672 50 
905 00 

1,120 00 
6,398 50 
1,870 00 
1,245 00 
2,350 00 

700 00 
3, 193 00 


$764 90 
368 17 

270 00 

1,207 88 

335 00 

140 96 

1,629 75 

155 00 
713 61 


$3,437 40 

1,273 17 

1,390 00 
7,606 38 
2,205 00 
1,385 96 
3,979 75 

855 00 
3,906 61 


$132 21 


Posey 


70 73 


Pulaski 


87 10 




66 14 


Randolph 


73 50 


Ripley 

Rush 


55 43 
71 07 


Scott 


Scottsburg 

Shelbyville 

Rockport 


29 48 


Shelby 


54 25 


Spencer 




Starke 












Steuben. 


Angola 


668 00 

2,920 00 
4,062 25 


140 00 

748 48 
805 00 


808 00 

3,668 48 
4,867 25 


73 27 


St. Joseph 


South Bend 

Sullivan 

Vevay 


53 17 


Sullivan 

Switzerland 


38 32 


Tippecanoe 

Tipton . ... 


Lafayette 

Tipton 


1,390 00 
648 00 

4,800 00 


920 82 
210 07 

2,161 49 


2,310 82 
858 07 

6,961 49 


117 77 
95 34 


Union 


Liberty 


62 61 








Vermillion . 


Newport 


4,417 50 


1,708 78 


6,126 28 


85 07 


Vigo 


Terre Haute . . . 




Wabash 


Wabash... . 










Warren 


WilUamsport 

Boonville 

Salem 


1,480 00 

840 00 

1,092 00 

1,123 00 
2,000 00 


180 00 
40 00 
176 36 

198 50 
225 00 


1,660 00 

880 00 

1,268 38 

1,321 50 
2,225 00 


97 65 


Warrick 


97 00 


Washington 


22 64 


Wayne . 


Richmond 

Bluff ton 

Monticello 


66 08 


WeUs 


71 77 


White 




Whitley. . . . 


Columbia City 


2,012 26 


330 91 


2,343 17 


48 82 






Totals . . . 


$114,698 06 


$33,636 55 


$148,334 61 


73 02 









24—18966 



370 



Year Book 



NUMBER OF TEACHERS. 





Number of Superintendents, Supervisors and Teachers Employed 


Counties 


Super- 
intendents 


Supervisors 

and Special 

Teachers 


High School 
Principals 


Principals 
Elemen- 
tary Schools 


Teachers of 
Regular 

High School 
Subjects 


Teachers of 
Elemen- 
tary 
Subjects 


Total 


Adams . 


3 
1 
2 

1 
2 

2 
1 
2 
3 
1 

2 

4 
2 
3 

2 
8 
3 
3 
5 

1 

2 
5 
1 
1 

2 
5 
5 
3 

2 

1 
1 
3 
1 
5 

3 
3 
3 
1 
2 

3 
2 
3 
1 

7 

2 
2 
7 
6 
4 

3 
1 
1 

2 

4 
2 
1 
4 
2 


4 
8 
16 
4 
9 

8 

1 

11 

15 

3 

2 
6 
11 
9 
6 

9 

10 
40 

2 
22 

9 
6 

14 
3 

8 

12 
17 
14 
13 
12 

7 

10 
28 
14 

8 

5 

4 
11 

6 

1 

18 
38 
11 
7 
64 

44 
10 
12 

3 

10 
11 
23 
10 

8 
9 
1 
3 
4 


8 
6 
6 
11 
4 

7 
3 

10 
10 
5 

8 
10 
5 
9 
5 

9 
8 
11 
6 

8 

8 
3 

7 
8 
8 

12 
10 

11 

10 

9 
11 
12 

7 
11 

10 
5 
8 
7 

11 

11 
14 
14 
13 
15 

13 
11 

8 

17 
10 

3 
12 

7 
13 
9 

5 

9 
1 
4 
5 


7 

18 

13 

1 

5 

3 


17 
67 
22 
29 
14 

28 
3 
23 
36 
21 

39 
43 
1 
27 
14 

21 
17 
66 
13 
49 

15 

22 

21 

3 

28 

30 
45 
32 
29 
26 

14 
43 

29 
36 
46 

23 
12 
21 
18 
16 

37 
43 
37 
17 
113 

48 
31 
63 
277 
23 

3 
33 
26 
54 
24 

6 
26 

2 

16 
15 


118 
415 
121 

85 
70 

139 

78 ■ 

99 
171 
156 

147 
139 
97 
152 
121 

105 
138 
232 
143 
232 

63 
120 
106 

79 
101 

184 
234 
228 
134 
92 

168 
106 
147 
151 
153 

137 
108 
131 
116 
104 

90 
223 
154 

98 
438 

196 
186 
282 
1,013 
150 

101 
144 
161 
139 
131 

82 
122 

27 
120 
103 


157 


Allen 


515 


Bartholomew 

Benton 


180 
131 


Blackford 


104 


Boone 


187 




86 


Carroll 


9 
14 

7 

28 
7 


154 


Cass 


249 


Clark .. 


193 


Clay 


226 


Clinton 


206 
118 




6 
4 

2 

3 

26 


205 


Dearborn 


153 


Decatur 


148 


Dekalb 


184 


Delaware 


378 


Dubois 


167 


Elkhart 


22 

5 
10 

7 
8 
8 

8 
26 

5 
13 

8 

2 
9 
11 
16 
5 

9 
2 
6 

7 


338 


Fayette 


101 


Floyd .. 


163 




160 


Franklin 


102 


Fulton 


154 


Gibson 


248 


Grant . . 


337 




295 


Hamilton 


203 




150 




201 


Hendricks ... . 


180 




230 


Howard 


225 


Huntington 


228 
187 


Jasper ... 


134 


Jay 


180 


Jefiferson 


155 


Jennings 

Johnson 


134 


6 
9 
3 
2 
44 

11 

7 
33 
73 

1 

1 
15 

4 
22 

4 


165 




329 




222 




138 


Lake.. .:::::::: 


681 


Laporte 


314 




247 


Madison 


405 




1,522 


Marshall 


202 


Martin 


113 




217 


Monroe 


210 


Montgomery 

Morgan 


252 
180 




105 


Noble 


7 


175 


Ohio 


32 


Orange 

Owen 


1 
1 


148 
130 



r 



Department Public Instruction 



NUMBER OF TEACHERS — Continued. 



371 







Number of Superintendents, Supervisors and Teachers Employed 




Counties 


Super- 
intendents 


Supervisors 

and Special 

Teachers 


High School 
Principals 


Principals 
Elemen- 
tary Schools 


Teachers of 
Regular 

High School 
Subjects 


Teachers of 
Elemen- 
tary 
Subjects 


Total 


Parke 


1 
2 

1 
1 
4 

1 
3 
3 
5 
2 

1 

1 
4 
3 
2 

3 
5 
3 

2 - 
1 

2 

1 
2 
3 

3 
1 

1 
4 

5 

1 
4 
2 


6 
5 
8 
11 
11 

4 
9 

30 
5 

14 

3 

15 
7 
4 
13 

46 

I 

8 
8 

5 

8 

4 

21 

22 
6 
9 
3 

31 
14 

7 
4 


9 
10 

7 
12 

8 

7 
13 
18 

7 
13 

3 
10 

7 
7 
10 

7 
13 

3 
20 

6 

8 

2 

7 

12 

11 

4 
9 
8 

14 
9 

8 
9 


6 
7 
3 
4 
29 

1 
3 
4 


22 
13 
10 
24 
19 

12 
23 
38 
9 
20 

5 
18 
13 

7 
14 

64 
32 

15 

3 

74 
36 
85 

36 
10 
16 
10 

49 
19 
22 
18 


127 
120 
* 125 
119 
91 

101 
130 
134 
123 
90 

51 
136 
136 
79 
91 

452 
164 

82 
181 

89 

39 
368 
134 
439 

128 
87 
153 
139 

182 
124 
123 
104 


171 


Perry 


157 


pSZ::::::::::::: 


154 


Porter 


171 




162 


Pulaski . 


126 


Putnam 


181 


Randolph 


227 


Ripley 


149 


Rush 


4 

3 

18 
13 

2 


143 


Scott 


66 


Shelby 


198 


Spencer 


180 


Starke 


102 


Steuben 


130 


St. Joseph 


24 

7 


596 


Sullivan 


228 




95 


Tippecanoe. . 




287 


Tipton 




119 






57 


Vanderburgh 


16 
5 
67 

13 


469 
188 


Vigo.. 


627 


Wabash 


213 


Warren 


108 


Warrick 

Washington 

Wayne 


2 
1 

20 
3 


190 
165 

301 


Wells... 


170 


White 


164 


Whitley 


2 


139 






Totals 


237 


1,185 


813 


841 


2,769 


14,221 


20,066 



372 



Year Book 



LENGTH OF TERM — NUMBER OF TEACHERS, 





Average length of School 
Term in Days 


Number of Superintendents, Supervisors and 
Teachers Employed 


Counties 


Elemen- 
tary 


High 
Schools 


Male j 


Female [ 


Total 




White 


Colored 


White 1 


Colored 


Adams 


161 
161 
. 150 
167 
161 

144 
136 
160 
166 
160 

157 
153 
112 
156 
148 

164 
161 
162 
151 
165 

161 
143 
155 
152 
143 

159 
155 
142 
147 

147 

140 
142 
169 
162 
155 

155 
158 
150 
125 
144 

164 
. 155 
163 
154 
191 

178 
147 
162 
172 
152 

126 
152 
140 
160 
158 

164 
158 
137 
139 
133 


171 
168 
163 
167 
173 

166 
153 
165 
166 
165 

-163 
170 
159 
164 
164 

166 
167 
167 
163 

170 

168 
170 
161 
155 
157 

167 
168 
163 
166 
160 

153 
161 
174 
171 
165 

165 
175 
162 
153 
142 

170 
164 
170 
165 
192 

178 
162 
173 
173 
168 

153 
162 
170 
168 
164 

178 
169 
180 
160 
154 


58 
119 
62 
30 
26 

64 
53 
46 
50 
50 

59 
76 
55 
75 
39 

45 
55 

85 
67 
91 

31 
41 
40 
37 
60 

82 
91 
105 
73 
44 

104 
52 
64 
60 
76 

54 
26 
65 
29 
33 

41 

88 
75 
38 
112 

53 

84 
117 
183 

61 

58 
73 
59 
63 
57 

21 
52 
7 
53 
41 




99 
396 
117 
101 

78 

123 
33 
108 
199 
130 

167 
130 
63 
128 
114 

103 
129 
293 
100 

247 

70 
109 
120 • 

65 

94 

154 
243 
190 
130 
106 

93 
128 
166 
164 
152 

132 
108 
115 
121 
100 

122 
237 
147 
100 
564 

261 
162 
288 
1,235 
141 

55 
144 
149 
187 
123 

84 
123 
25 
94 
88 




157 


Allen 






515 


Bartholomew .... 




1 


180 






131 


Blackford 






104 


Boone 






187 


Brown 






86 


Carroll 






154 


Cass 






249 


Clark 


4 


9 


193 


Clay 


226 








206 


Crawford 






118 






2 


205 


Dearborn 




153 


Decatur 




148 


Dekalb 






184 








378 








167 


Elkhart 






338 


Fayette 






101 


Floyd. 


4 


9 


163 


Fountain 


160 








102 


Fulton 






154 




6 

1 


6 
2 


248 


Grant 


337 


Greene 


295 









203 


Hancock 






150 




1 


3 


201 


Hendricks 


180 


FTftnry 






230 


Howard 




1 


225 


Huntington 




228 




1 




187 






134 








180 


Jefferson 


4 

1 

1 
1 


1 


155 


Jennings 


134 


Johnson ... ...... 


1 
3 


165 


Knox 


329 




222 








138 


K"^': 


1 


4 


681 




314 






1 


247 






405 




14 


90 


1,522 


Marshall 


,202 








113 


Miami 






217 


Monroe 


1 

1 


1 

1 


210 


Montgomery 


252 




180 








105 


Noble 






175 


Ohio 






32 






1 
1 


148 


Qyrm.. '...'..'...'.'..'... 




130 



Department Public Instruction 373 

LENGTH OF TERM — NUMBER OF TEACHERS — Continued. 



Counties 



Average length of School 
Term in Days 



Elemen- 
tary 



High 
Schools 



Number of Superintendents, Supervisors and 
Teachers Employed 



Male 



White Colored 



Female 



White 



Colored 



Total 



Parke 

Perry 

Pike 

Porter 

Posey 

Pulaski 

Putnam 

Randolph . . . 

Ripley 

Rush 

Scott 

Shelby 

Spencer 

Starke 

Steuben 

St. Joseph . . . 

Sullivan 

Switzerland . 
Tippecanoe. . 
Tipton 

Union 

Vanderburgh 
Vermillion . . . 
Vigo 

Wabash 

Warren 

Warrick 

Washington . 

Wayne 

Wells 

White 

Whitley 

Totals. . 



146 
136 
140 
180 
170 

150 
153 
156 
143 
167 

128 
153 
149 
160 
162 

190 
152 
120 
174 
149 

163 
193 
170 
173 

170 
146 
139 
124 

165 
161 
150 
150 



162 
166 
143 
180 
170 

161 
167 
148 
161 
169 

153 



163 
164 

190 
160 
150 
174 
167 

167 
200 
172 
176 

170 
160 
157 
141 

168 
170 
156 



29 



10 



119 
103 
73 
152 



97 
118 
161 
103 
108 

44 
107 
123 
76 
98 

511 

177 

57 

224 

77 

41 
383 
156 
515 

163 
86 
103 

95 

230 
99 
122 
101 



171 
157 
154 
171 
162 

126 
181 
227 
149 
143 

66 
198 
180 
102 
130 

596 
228 
95 
287 
119 

57 
469 
188 
627 

213 

108 
190 
165 

301 
170 
164 
139 



154 



165 



5,340 



14,465 



190 



20,066 



REPORT OF THE STATE BOARD OF HEALTH 

For the Year Ending September 30, 1918 
(Abridged) 



Members of the State Board of Health 

CHAS. B. KERN, M.D., President, Lafayette, Ind. 

HUGH A. COWING, M.D., Vice-President, Muncie, Ind. 

JAMES H. BOYERS, M.D., Decatur, Ind. 

JOHN H. HEWITT, M.D., Terre Haute, Ind. (In Army Service). 

J. N. HURTY, M.D., Secretary, Indianapolis, Ind. 

W. F. KING, M.D., Asst. Secretary, Indianapolis, Ind.- 

Personnel of Superintendents of Divisions 

WILLIAM F. KING, M.D., Supt. Division of Venereal Diseases. 
H. E. BARNARD, Ph.D., Supt. Division of Chemistry. 
W. H. SHIMER, M.D., Supt. Laboratory of Hygiene. 
H. M. WRIGHT, Supt. Division of Vital Statistics. 
H. R. CONDREY, Supt. Division of Accounts. 

INTRODUCTION 

The law creating the Indiana State Board of Health charges great 
responsibilities upon the Board. It gives the supervision of the health and 
life of the citizens to the Board and aims in the machinery provided to 
make it possible for the high purpose, of preserving health and life, to be 
properly accomplished. The object is clearly expressed in the law, and 
the powers conferred are ample, but the funds never have been anywhere 
equal for accomplishing the work aimed at, nor has the machinery 
been adequate. The greatest difficulty of the law is the health officer 
system. At present it provides a health officer in every county, in every 
city and in every town, appointed by local authorities. The said health 
officer to be a physician, and any physician who possesses a license to 
practice is eligible to the appointment, not taking into account his having 
skill and knowledge concerning the work he is to do. In the matter of 
health officers it is fair to state that the present law is out of date, 
sadly unscientific and not equal to the work of practically applying 
modern disease prevention methods. It therefore fails to produce the 
best results and the money spent is largely wasted. It is like an old, 
wheezy, back-number locomotive, which can run a little and pull a light 
load. Think of a railroad company trying to do business at this time 
with such a machine. The present law for its execution employs doctors 
for such time as they choose to give from their practice. 

No man can serve two masters, yet the law attempts to accomplish 
this impossibility. The doctor health officer, being in the practice of 
medicine, is in competition with his brother physicians, and, of course, 

(374) 



State Board of Health 375 

cannot secure their co-operation. Without this co-operation, only partial 
success in disease prevention work is possible. 

Another gross defect in the old law lies in the fact that only a very 
few doctors are, in even slight degree, educated or trained in disease 
prevention methods. Most doctors have studied cure only. The ounce 
of prevention they do not know how to apply. Their skill lies in ap- 
plying the costly pound of cure. 

Three Fatal Defects exist in the present health law. 

(1) Health officers are practicing doctors, giving what time they 
choose to public health work. 

(2) Health officers are practicing doctors in competition with their 
brother doctors, and therefore, cannot secure their co-operation. With- 
out this co-operation present health officers are only partially successful. 

(8) Health officers practicing medicine (curative) are without ex- 
ception, uninformed and untrained in disease prevention work. Their 
education and training is in the line of the pound of cure and not in the 
line of the ounce of prevention. Hence they are not efficient and eco- 
nomical to the State. 

Other Defects exist in the present health law, but they are only ob- 
structive to its enforcement, not fatal. For instance — 

(1) The law does not clearly and fully define health officers' duties 
and powers. % 

(2) It does not provide adequate pay. 

(3) It does not provide a health fund. 

(4) It does not provide a proper penalty for failure or refusal to 
fulfill duties. 

Failure and Expense will continue if the Legislature does not provide 
a new machine. The old one has served its day. 

A New Law, up-to-date and scientific, would provide — 

(1) Trained health officers who give their entire time to keeping 
away disease and improving the public health. Such officers should be 
appointed from an eligible list upon which they have obtained recogni- 
tion through physical and mental examination. 

(2) A County Health Commissioner appointed in each county. 

a. His salary should be a living one, graded by the number of 

people he serves. 

b. His duties and powers should be clearly defined. 

c. He should keep full and accurate records of his work. 

d. He should be subordinate to the State Board of Health. 

e. He should make weekly reports to the State Board of 

Health. 

f. He should be subject to dismissal for such reasons as the 

law may set forth. 

g. A proper health appropriation should be provided in each 

county. 

A Modern Health Law, as above outlined, would not create a new 
office, but would make an old office efficient. It would abolish all town 
health officers, and all city officers and boards of health in cities under 



376 Year Book 

ten thousand mnaoitants. Such officers would be unnecessary under the 
new system, and their abolition would be a saving of expenditure with 
increased efficiency. 

A Modern Health Law would not be an expense, but an investment, 
bringing splendid returns in freedom from epidemics, increased health, 
with its attendant increase in wealth, and best of all, it would bring 
greater efficiency and happiness. 

Ill health and disease are largely preventable, and under a good 
health law they would be largely prevented. Let us then have a proper 
machine and reap the good harvest. 

A decrease in crime, insanity and poverty would attend the enactment 
and enforcement of a modern health law. This is true because it would 
reduce ill health and disease which are causative of much crime, in- 
sanity and poverty. These social ills are a terrible burden for society 
to carry. Any reduction of them would constitute an economy and a 
state betterment. The value would be very great. 

The future belongs to that nation which has the most health and 
strength, not to the one which leads in sickness and weakness. Let us 
have all else but health and we fail. Hygiene can do more to advance 
the wealth and happiness of mankind than any other science. 

PROGRESS 

Despite the great need of a new administrative machine meeting the 
requirements of the day, progress is being made. The public health 
department, which in the beginning commanded very little respect or 
consideration, now has a full share of influence accorded to it, and this 
certainly is progress. In November, 1917, another progressive step was 
taken when the State Board of Health work was linked up with the U. 
S. Public Health Service at Washington, On account of encouragement 
from the national authorities, a division was created having the title, 
Division of Venereal Diseases. Dr. Wm. F. King, Assistant Secretary, 
was placed at the head of this department and he received appoint- 
ment from the U. S. Public Health Service of Acting Assistant Surgeon, 
with the rank of lieutenant. Slowly the department was organized, and at 
the present time is making fair progress in the fight against the awful 
venereal diseases. The plan pursued by the department is outlined in 
the following circular sent out over the State. 

INDIANA IN THE NATION-WIDE CAMPAIGN AGAINST VENEREAL DISEASE 

Venereal diseases constitute a public health problem just as truly as 
smallpox, typhoid fever or tuberculosis. This truth has been recognized 
by sanitarians, physicians and far-thinking persons for years, while the 
people generally have been content to prudishly bury their heads in the 
sand, ostrich-like, and discourage any attempt to deal openly with these 
so-called "private" or "social" diseases. Developments which have come 
with the world war and the lessons gained in the one year of U. S. par- 
ticipation in the war are rapidly changing this attitude. Medical ex- 
aminations of enlisted and selective draft men show a large percentage 
physically unfit because of venereal disease. More than five-sixths of 
the venereal disease with which medical officers in the army training 



State Board of Health 377 

camps have had to deal has come with the soldiers from civilian life. 
An average of seven out of every one hundred young men coming into 
training camps from civilian life or returning from furlough have been 
found infected with venereal disease. In other words, the civilian com- 
munity, urban and rural, has contributed to the government a seven per 
cent casualty list from this one source of communicable and preventable 
disease. 

These are facts most unpleasant and disquieting to contemplate in 
this hour of supreme test of the strength and virility of the Nation. 

Because of these facts the Federal Government has called upon all 
the States to join in a nation-wide fight against venereal diseases, the 
purpose being to reduce the prevalence and ravages of these diseases to 
a minimum. The State Boards of Health of every State are called upon 
to adopt and enforce the Government plan and to organize all the health 
forces of the State into efficient fighting units. The requirements of the 
Government plan are as follows: 

1. Venereal diseases declared to be contagious, infectious, com- 
municable and dangerous to the public health. 

2. Venereal diseases to be reported. 

3. Patients to be given information in regard to the serious nature 
of venereal diseases and instructed in measures to prevent the spread of 
infection. 

4. Cases of venereal disease to be investigated by health officials to 
ascertain the sources of infection. 

5. Persons who have or who are reasonably suspected of having 
venereal disease and who are not under proper treatment, to be quar- 
antined whenever quarantine is deemed necessary for the protection of 
the public health. 

6. Patients released from quarantine when no longer infectious. 
Patients must agree to continue treatment after release from quarantine 
until cured. 

7. Spread of venereal disease declared to be unlawful. 

8. Prostitution to be repressed. 

9. Restriction of travel by venereally infected persons. 

REVIEW OF ACTIVITIES DURING THE YEAR ENDING 
SEPTEMBER 30, 1918 

The Board held four regular and seven special meetings as follows: 

Regular quarterly meeting, October 3, 1917. 
Regular quarterly meeting, January 9, 1918. 
Regular quarterly meeting, April 3, 1918. 
Regular quarterly meeting, July 10, 1918. 
Special meeting, November 9, 1917. 
Special meeting, November 12, 1917. 
Speical meeting, February 27, 1918. 
Special meeting, March 20, 1918. 
Special meeting. May 28, 1918. 
Special meeting. May 29, 1918. 
Special meeting, June 28, 1918. 



378 Year Book 

Abstract of Proceedings of Above Meetings, as follows: 

The first meeting for the above period was held October 3d. — The 
secretary reported no epidemics for the preceding quarter, except a 
severe typhoid epidemic at South Bend. The secretary reported the 
success of the public health exhibit of the State Board at the State Fair. 
The newspapers pronounced it one of the features of the fair. Smallpox 
was reported in each of the months of the preceding quarter, and a very 
considerable smallpox, epidemic occurred at Bicknell, with no deaths. 
The laboratory of hygiene reported some remarkable features. Same 
were set forth at length in report of that department. The superin- 
tendent of the Food and Drug and Water Laboratories reported con- 
cerning the additional work leading out of the Federal Food Adminis- 
tration campaigns. Dr. Helwig was given leave of absence as an em- 
ploye of the State Board of Health, without pay, to serve in the U. S. 
Public Health Service. 

Abstract of Proceedings of Special Meeting Held November 9. — Ob- 
ject of the meeting was to confer with Adj. -Gen. Harry Smith in regard 
to the insanitary and bad housing conditions in Lake County, also in 
regard to the war and the military thereto. General Smith appeared 
before the board and said he had received a visit from Major-General 
Carter in command of the Chicago U. S. Military District, and directly 
from him had received information concerning insanitary conditions and 
bad housing conditions in the cities of Lake County. The General stated 
in part: "The housing conditions are so bad in instances that they cer- 
tainly will result in disease and probably epidemics. This has many 
times and again caused riots and disorder and will also materially 
lessen the output of munitions of war." After full consideration of the 
report, and consultation with General Smith, it was ordered that a 
special meeting of the State Board of Health should be held at Ham- 
mond, Monday, November 12, 1917, to meet with the local authorities of 
the cities of Lake County and consider what should be done in regard 
to housing conditions in said county. Rule 10, detailing the infectious 
diseases which should be reported, was amended by adding gonorrhea 
and syphilis. The secretary was ordered to duly and properly promul- 
gate the same. 

Abstract of Proceedings, Special Meeting, Hammond, November 12, 
1917. — The entire board was present and the meeting was held in the 
rooms of the Hammond Chamber of Commerce. There was a large 
audience, the following cities being represented by delegates: Hammond, 
East Chicago, Gary, and Whiting. President Kern called upon Secretary 
Hurty to announce the object of the meeting, which was for the purpose 
of considering the sanitary survey previously made of the housing and 
sanitary conditions of the cities named and to then consider what meas- 
ures should be adopted for the betterment of conditions. The previous 
survey referred to had been made, under the direction of Dr. King by 
four inspectors, and was given in great detail, and to the effect that 
awful housing conditions had been discovered and that disease epidemics 
might at any time break out. Further, the moral conditions were bad 
and these were likely to cause epidemics. Discussion of the subject and 



State Board of Health 3^9 

report were made by Mayor Johnson of Gary, Mayor Smalley of Ham- 
mond, Dr. R. P. Hale, county health commissioner. Dr. Reyher, city 
health officer of Gary, and Dr. Teegarden, health officer of East Chicago, 
and many others. Finally an order was adopted as follows: 

PUBLIC health and HOUSING ORDER BY THE INDIANA STATE BOARD OF 
HEALTH TO THE CITY BOARD OF HEALTH OF , INDIANA 

Whereas, Gross unsanitary conditions of various kinds and character 
well known to the authorities and citizens of East Chicago exist in said 
city and are not abated, and 

Whereas, The housing law has been constantly violated to the knowl- 
edge of the authorities and citizens, therefore according to the statutes 
provided, the State Board of Health orders as follows, to wit : 

Ordered, The city health board of East Chicago shall, without delay, 
proceed to remove and abate to the fullest degree practicable, all in sani- 
tary conditions in East Chicago, proceeding first against the worst in- 
sanitary conditions, and then against those which may be considered 
minor, and the City Board of Health of East Chicago is further 

Ordered, If said board of health of East Chicago does not promptly 
take hold of this matter and enforce the commands of the State Board 
of Health as herein given, then the State Board of Health, as in the 
statutes provided, will take charge of the enforcing of the health laws 
and housing laws of the State within said City of East Chicago, Indiana. 

(A similar order went forward to the health authorities of Gary, 
Hammond and Whiting.) 

Abstract of Proceedings of Regular Meeting Held January 9, 1918. — 
Present: Drs. Boyers, Cowing, Hurty. The secretary reported the U. 
S. Census Bureau had admitted Indiana into the Birth Registration 
Area, which was a considerable honor, and that full authorization was 
received together with proper blanks to go ahead and make transcripts 
for all the births for 1917. The secretary also announced that, in ac- 
cordance with previous orders, he had started the campaign of the State 
Board of Health against venereal diseases. The first step was to ap- 
point Dr. Edward Helwig as social medical inspector. The details of the 
work already done by him were fully reported. Dr. Gibson of the U. S. 
Animal Industry was present and told in detail of his work of tuberculin 
testing of cattle in the State of Indiana. Telegram was read from Sur- 
geon-General Blue of the U. S. Public Health Service concerning the 
importance of fighting venereal diseases, and the secretary was in- 
structed to report to General Blue what was being done. The chief of 
police of Indianapolis sent a communication in which he offered the 
services of his men in the work of venereal disease prevention. 

Abstract of Proceedings of Special Meeting Held February 27, 1918. 
— This meeting was for the purpose of hearing citizens of Sugar Creek 
Township, Hancock County, concerning a petition for extension of the 
order of condemnation of the schoolhouse at New Palestine. Present: 
Drs. Kern, Hewitt, Boyers, Hurty, The meeting was held in the Gov- 
ernor's office because the rooms of the State Board of Health were too 
small. Attorneys for both sides were present and finally the board con- 



380 Year Booi^ 

eluded to take no action aiid to permit its previous order of condemnEl- 
tion to remain in force. 

The following rules, requiring the reporting of venereal diseases, 
were passed and all former rules concerning the matter were annulled: 

Rule 1. On and after April 1, 1918, it shall be the duty of 
every physician in the State of Indiana, to report forthwith in 
writing to the State Board of Health at Indianapolis, on blanks 
furnished by said Board of Health, the name, address, age, sex, 
color, marital state, occupation, name of disease and such other 
related statistical facts as may be required, of every person com- 
ing under his examination or care having the following infectious 
diseases, to wit: Gonorrhea, chancroid, syphilis. All such reports 
shall be confidential and shall not be inspected by any person 
other than the official custodian of such reports in the State Board 
of Health, the members of the State Board of Health and such 
other persons as may be authorized by the State Health Commis- 
sioner to inspect such reports, nor shall any official having access 
to such reports, disclose the name or identity of any person named 
therein. 

Rule 2. Whenever a physician shall report in writing to the 
State Board of Health that a person afflicted with gonorrhea, 
chancroid or syphilis whom he has treated or examined on and 
after April 1, 1918, cannot properly and sufficiently be treated at 
home, he shall communicate such fact to the State Board of Health 
and make such recommendations as he may deem proper; and 
when it is possible and in the judgnjent of the State Health Com- 
missioner it ig advisable, the said reported person shall be quaran- 
tined and treatment given until such time as the patient may be 
no longer infectious. 

The rat problem was considered and plans adopted for fighting rats. 
The death of the leper, David S. Byers, at Fort Branch, was reported 
and the secretary was ordered to determine by proper scientific means 
whether or not Mrs. Byers and Miss Byers were infected with leprosy 
and if found negative the quarantine to be discharged. 

Abstract of Proceedings Special Meeting, March 20, 1918. — The meet- 
ing was called at the command of Governor Goodrich to again consider 
the schoolhouse question at New Palestine. He also announced the other 
object was to consider the attack upon the honesty and integrity of Dr. 
King, assistant secretary of the board, by the Indianapolis Herald, a 
paper edited and published in Indianapolis. The meeting was held in 
the Governor's office. The Governor presented his view or opinion in re- 
gard to extending the condemnation of the schoolhouse at New Palestine, 
which was to the effect that condemnation should be extended. The mat- 
ter was considered pro and con and finally the board again concluded to 
take no further action but to permit conditions to remain as they were. 
The attack on Dr. King by the Herald accusing him of dishonesty was 
thoroughly reviewed and finally a resolution was adopted to the effect 
that the attack was altogether vicious and without foundation, and ex- 
pressing the fullest confidence of the board in Dr. King. Dr. Ada 



State Board of Health 361 

Schweitzer of the Hygiene Laboratory was granted a leave of absence to 
serve in the U. S. Children's Bureau for three months. The secretary 
announced that Mr. John Diggs, sanitary engineer in the Water and 
Sewage Department, had received an appointment in the U. S. service 
and was given an indefinite leave of absence. 

Abstract of Proceedings, Regular Meeting, April 3, 1918. — The secre- 
tary reported smallpox as much in evidence in the preceding quarter. 
He also reported the death of Captain J. L. Anderson, accountant of 
the board for 17 years. A resolution of sympathy was sent to his widow 
and an account of his faithful services was spread of record. A report 
on venereal disease work was made by Dr. Helwig. 

Abstract of Proceedings of Special Meeting, May 28, 1918. — All 
members of the board were present and the president announced the 
object of the meeting was for the members to attend the annual con- 
vention of health officers, participate in the discussions and to do what- 
ever was possible to make the convention a success. The secretary an- 
nounced there were 250 officers in attendance and the program had been 
carried out as published with one exception. 

Abstract of Proceedings, Special Meeting, May 29. — All members of 
the board were present except Dr. Hewitt. Object of the meeting was to 
attend the second day of the annual convention of health officers to par- 
ticipate in the discussions and to give service toward making the meet- 
ing a success. The secretary reported 330 in attendance and the pro- 
gram had been carried out exactly as printed. 

Abstract of Proceedings of Special Meeting, June ;25.— The meeting 
was called to hold a joint session with the Governor and State Board of 
Accounts for the purpose of considering misunderstandings which ex- 
isted. The board then adjourned to the Governor's office to attend the 
joint meeting. The Governor opened the meeting by saying that he had 
read most of the report made by the State Board of Accounts which had 
been sumbitted to Governor Ralston, the report itself having been made 
three years previously. The report purported to present evidence that 
Dr. King was probably either remotely or directly connected with cer- 
tain interests that had ventilating and heating appliances for sale. The 
entire proceedings of this meeting in full detail are set forth in the 
records of the State Board of Health for 1918, page 421, et seq. Dr. 
King was entirely exonerated. 

Abstract of Proceedings, Regular Meeting, July 10. — All members 
of the board were present and in addition to the regular business for the 
preceding quarter, the president announced that the board would meet 
with the Governor and State Board of Accounts to consider and if pos- 
sible to agree upon articles of co-operation. The board then adjourned 
to the Governor's office. There the State Board of Accounts had already 
gathered. The Governor called the meeting together, differences of un- 
derstanding between the two bodies were thoroughly discussed and 
finally an agreement was adopted which was according to order duly 
signed by the secretary of the board and the State Examiner. The secre- 
tary reported in detail concerning the cleaning up of Jeffersonville and 
New Albany under the supervision of the U. S. Public Health Service 



382 Year Book 

and the secretary also reported the organization at Washington, Daviess 
County, special activities to fight venereal plagues being supported by the 
mayor and city council. The Warsaw water supply was considered, the 
evidence concerning the same being carefully reviewed. An opinion from 
the Attorney-General was read to the effect that the State Board of 
Health had power under the law to order improvements of public water 
supplies. Accordingly, the secretary was directed to make inquiries, 
surveys and inspections and report what should be done in this matter 
to the next meeting. The important announcement was made that the 
Bacteriological Laboratory had begun the making of Wassermann blood 
tests for syphilis, considerable new apparatus had been purchased and 
further preparation had been made for the work. 

MONTHLY ANALYSIS OF DISEASE PREVALENCE 

(As published in the Monthly Bulletin.) 

January, 1918 — Scarlet fever was reported as the most prevalent infectious disease. 
The order of prevalence was as follows: Scarlet fever, measles, smallpox, diphtheria 
and croup, pulmonary tuberculosis, tonsilitis, bronchopneumonia, lobar pneumonia, influ- 
enza, whooping-cough, chickenpox, acute rheumatism, typhoid fever, diarrhea and en- 
teritis, erysipelas, other forms of tuberculosis, cerebrospinal fever, dysentery, poliomyelitis, 
intermittent and remittent fever, puerperal fever, malaria fever, ophthalmia neonatorum, 
trachoma, rabies in animals, rabies in human. 

February, 1918 — Measles was reported as the most prevalent infectious disease. The 
order of prevalence was as follows: Measles, smallpox, scarlet fever, diphtheria and 
croup, tonsilitis, pulmonary tuberculosis, whooping-cough, lobar pneumonia, influenza, 
bronchial pneumonia, acute rheumatism, chickenpox, erysipelas, typhoid fever, other 
forms of tuberculosis, diarrhea and enteritis, puerperal fever, cerebrospinal fever, inter- 
mittent and remittent fever, malaria fever, dysentery, poliomyelitis, rabies in animals, 
ophthalmia neonatorum, trachonaa, rabies in human. 

March, 1918 — Measles, as in the previous month, was reported as the most pre- 
valent infectious disease. The order of prevalence was as follows: Measles, smallpox, 
scarlet fever, pulmonary tuberculosis, diphtheria and croup, tonsilitis, lobar pneumonia, 
whooping-cough, broncho-pneumonia, influenza, acute rheumatism, chickenpox, typhoid 
fever, erysipelas, cerebrospinal fever, diarrhea and enteritis, other forms of tuberculosis, 
malaria fever, intermittent and remittent fever, rabies in human, ophthalmia neona- 
torum, dysentery, trachoma, puerperal fever, poliomyelitis, rabies in animals. 

April, 1918 — Smallpox was reported as the most prevalent infectious disease: The 
order of prevalence was as follows: Smallpox, measles, scarlet fever, pulmonary tuber- 
culosis, diphtheria and croup, tonsilitis, lobar pneumonia, whooping-cough, influenza, 
bronchial pneumonia, acute rheumatism, chickenpox, typhoid fever, erysipelas, cerebro- 
spinal fever, other forms of tuberculosis, diarrhea and enteritis, malaria fever, inter- 
mittent and remittent fever, ophthalmia neonatorum, trachoma, puerperal fever, dysen- 
tery, poliomyelitis, rabies in animals, rabies in human. 

May, 1918 — Smallpox, as in the preceding month, was reported as the most preva- 
lent infectious disease. The order of prevalence was as follows: Smallpox, pulmonary 
tuberculosis, measles, tonsilitis, diphtheria and croup, scarlet fever, whooping-cough, 
rheumatism, typhoid fever, chickenpox, influenza, lobar pneumonia, bronchial pneu- 
monia, diarrhea and enteritis, erysipelas, intermittent and remittent fever, other forms 
of tuberculosis, cerebrospinal fever, malaria fever, puerperal fever, dysentery trachoma, 
poliomyelitis, rabies in human, rabies in animals, opthalmia neonatorum. 

June, 1918 — Pulmonary tuberculosis was reported as the most prevalent infectious 
disease. The order of prevalence was as follows: Pulmonary tuberculosis, smallpox, 
scarlet fever, measles, diphtheria, tonsilitis, whooping-cough, acute rheumatism, typhoid 
fever, diarrhea and enteritis, malaria fever, intermittent and remittent fever, chicken- 
pox, dysentery, influenza, other forms of tuberculosis, bronchial pneumonia, erysipelas, 
lobar pneumonia, cerebrospinal fever, trachoma, poliomyelitis, rabies in human, ophthal- 
mia neonatorum, puerperal fever, rabies in animals. 



State Board of Health 383 

July, 1918 — Pulmonary tuberculosis was reported as the most prevalent disease. 
The order of prevalence was as follows: Pulmonary tuberculosis, typhoid fever, diph- 
theria and croup, tonsilitis, diarrhea and enteritis, smallpox, scarlet fever, whooping- 
cough, measles, acute rheumatism, dysentery, malaria fever, chickenpox, intermittent 
and remittent fever, influenza, bronchial pneumonia, other forms of tuberculosis, 
poliomyelitis, erysipelas, lobar pneumonia, cerebrospinal fever, trachoma, rabies in 
human, puerperal fever, ophthalmia neonatorum, rabies in animals. 

August, 1918— 

September, 1918 — 

October, 1918— 

November, 1918 — 

December, 1918 — _ 

MONTHLY ANALYSIS OF SMALLPOX 

(As published in the Monthly Bulletin.) 

January, 1918 — 1,003 cases in 58 counties with 3 deaths. The following counties 
reported smallpox present: Adams, 20 cases; Allen, 97; Benton, 2; Boone, 2; Cass, 2 
Clay, 109 ; Dearborn, 7 ; Dekalb, 1 ; Delaware, 6 ; Elkhart, 10 ; Fayette, 3 ; Franklin, 1 
Gibson, 8 ; Grant, 2 ; Greene, 28 ; Hendricks, 13 ; Henry, 6 ; Howard, 3 cases and 1 death 
Huntington, 1 case ; Jackson, 1 ; Jasper, 1 ; Jay, 15 ; Jefferson, 1 ; Jennings, 2 ; Johnson, 

6 ; Knox, 9 ; Kosciusko, 2 ; Lagrange, 4 ; Lake, 2 ; Laporte, 11 ; Marion, 309 cases and 1 
death ; Marshall, 15 cases ; Monroe, 22 ; Montgomery, 9 ; Morgan, 34 ; Noble, 15 ; Orange, 
9 ; Parke, 2 ; Perry, 3 ; Pulaski, 1 ; Putnam, 4 ; Randolph, 4 ; Rush, 6 ; Shelby, 15 
Spencer, 2 ; Steuben, 3 ; St. Joseph, 1 ; Sullivan, 2 ; Tippecanoe, 6 ; Vanderburgh, 5 
Vigo, 10 ; Wabash, 1 ; Warren, 6 ; Wayne, 53 cases and 1 death ; Wells, 2 cases 
Whitley, 2. 

February, 1918 — 1,125 cases in 61 counties, with 7 deaths. The counties reporting 
smallpox present were: Adams, 5 ; Allen, 55 ; Benton, 3 ; Blackford, 1 ; Boone, 22 ; Brown, 
6 ; Cass, 7 ; Clay, 20 ; Clinton, 4 ; Daviess, 18 ; Dearborn, 9 ; Dekalb, 12 ; Delaware, 76 
Fayette, 3 ; Fulton, 1 ; Gibson, 5 ; Grant, 17 ; Greene, 40 ; Hamilton, 4 ; Hancock, 1 
Harrison, 3 ; Hendricks, 10 ; Henry, 4 ; Huntington, 1 ; Jackson, 3 ; Jasper, 5 ; Jay, 4 
Johnson, 3 ; Knox, 85 ; Lagrange, 4 ; Lake, 33 ; Laporte, 36 ; Lawrence, 2 ; Madison, 68 
Marion, 287 ; Marshall, 5 ; Monroe, 35 ; Montgomery, 2 ; Morgan, 7 ; Orange, 29 ; Parke, 3 
Pike, 13 ; Pulaski, 2 ; Putnam, 5 ; Randolph, 20 ; Rush, 1 ; Shelby, 37 ; Spencer, 1 ; St 
Joseph, 1 ; Sullivan, 4 ; Switzerland, 2 ; Tippecanoe, 1 ; Tipton, 7 ; Vanderburgh, 38 
Vermillion, 3 ; Vigo, 5 ; Wabash, 1 ; Warrick, 5 ; Washington, 10 ; Wayne, 30 ; Wells, 1 
The deaths occurred in : Blackford, 1 ; Delaware, 1 ; Hendricks, 1 ; Marion, 1 ; Gibson 
1; Knox, 2. 

March, 1918 — 1,027 cases reported in 64 counties, with 2 deaths. The counties re- 
porting smallpox present were : Adams, 34 ; Allen, 61 cases and 1 death ; Benton, 1 case ; 
Brown, 7 ; Cass, 9 ; Clark, 1 ; Clay, 17 ; Clinton, 2 ; Daviess, 42 ; Dearborn, 19 ; Dekalb, 3 ; 
Delaware, 58 ; Fayette, 1 ; Fulton, 10 ; Gibson, 3 ; Grant, 13 ; Greene, 27 cases and 1 
death ; Hamilton, 4 cases ; Hancock, 3 ; Henry, 7 ; Howard, 1 ; Jackson, 1 ; Jasper, 1 
Jay, 5 ; Jefferson, 2 ; Johnson, 5 ; Knox, 14 ; Kosciusko, 1 ; Lagrange, 1 ; Lake, 1 
Laporte, 29 ; Lawrence, 17 ; Madison, 58 ; Marion, 258 ; Martin, 12 ; Miami, 4 ; Monroe 
48 ; Morgan, 1 ; Newton, 1 ; Ohio, 5 ; Orange, 3 ; Park-e, 8 ; Pike, 3 ; Putnam, 10 
Randolph, 31; Rush, 4; Shelby, 19; Spencer, 5; St. Joseph, 14; Sullivan, 2; Switzerland 

7 ; Tippecanoe, 2 ; Tipton, 13 ; Union, 1 ; Vanderburgh, 36 ; Vermillion, 5 ; Vigo, 8 
Warrick, 1 ; Washington, 22 ; Wayne, 23 ; Wells, 1 ; White, 2 ; Whitley, 2. 

April, 1918 — 804 cases reported in 64 counties, with 3 deaths. The counties reporting 
smallpox present were: Allen, 36 cases; Benton, 6; Blackford, 12; Boone, 19; Cass, 
23 ; Clay, Clay, 7 ; Daviess, 3 ; Dearborn, 5 ; Decatur, 4 ; Dekalb, 5 ; Delaware, 50 ; Elk- 
hart, 22 ; Fayette, 2 ; Floyd, 3 ; Fountain, 3 ; Fulton, 10 ; Gibson, 8 ; Grant, 27 ; Greene 
39 ; Hamilton, 9 ; Hancock, 4 ; Hendricks, 5 ; Henry, 7 ; Howard, 1 ; Huntington, 1 
Jackson, 1 ; Jay, 7 ; Jennings, 4 ; Johnson, 8 ; Knox, 6 ; Kosciusko, 2 ; Lagrange, 4 ; 
Lake, 13 ; Laporte, 10 ; Lawrence, 5 ; Madison, 67 ; Marion, 175 ; Martin, 3 ; Miami, 1 
Monroe, 19 ; Montgomery, 6 ; Morgan, 47 ; Noble, 7 ; Ohio, 3 ; Owen, 1 ; Parke, 2 ; Pike, 2 
Porter, 1 ; Posey, 8 ; Putnam, 1 ; Randolph, 1 ; Shelby, 12 ; Spencer, 1 ; St. Joseph, 9 
Sullivan, 2 ; Tipton, 2 ; Vanderburgh, 13 ; Vermillion, 1 ; Vigo, 8 ; Warren, 2 ; Warrick, 



384 Year Book 

18 ; Wayne, 11 ; Wells, 4 ; White, 6. There were three deaths, one in St. Joseph County, 
one in Madison County, and one in Knox County. 

May, 1918 — 588 cases in 61 counties, with 3 deaths. The counties reporting smallpox 
present were: Allen, 10; Benton, 2; Boone, 1; Carroll, 1; Cass, 10; Clark, 20; Clay, 
7 ; Clinton, 8 ; Daviess, 2 ; Dearborn, 7 ; Dekalb, 6 ; Delaware, 19 ; Elkhart, 10 ; Fayette, 3 ; 
Fulton, 1 ; Gibson, 7 ; Grant, 8 ; Greene, 15 ; Hamilton, 8 ; Hancock, 3 ; Hendricks, 1 ; 
Henry, 1 ; Howard, 3 ; Huntington, 3 ; Jackson, 15 ; Jay, 9 ; Jennings, 1 ; Johnson, 10 ; 
Knox, 12 ; Lake, 8 ; Laporte, 2 ; Lawrence, 12 ; Madison, 50 ; Marion, 147 ; Martin, 16 ; 
Miami, 3 ; Monroe, 9 ; Montgomery, 4 ; Morgan, 22 ; Noble, 20 ; Ohio, 2 ; Orange, 20 ; 
Parke, 6 ; Pike, 2 ; Porter, 1 ; Putnam, 5 ; Randolph, 3 ; Rush, 1 ; Shelby, 9 ; Steuben, 1 ; 
St. Joseph, 3 ; Switzerland, 1 ; Tippecanoe, 1 ; Union, 2 ; Vanderburgh, 14 ; Vermillion, 1 ; 
Vigo, 8 ; Warrick, 5 ; Wayne, 1 ; Wells, 10 : White. 1. The deaths occurred in Cass 
County, 1 ; Knox, 1 ; Sullivan, 1. 

June, 1918 — 314 cases in 48 counties, with 1 death. The counties reporting small- 
pox present were: Allen, 2; Benton, 10; Blackford, 1; Cass, 8; Clark, 20; Clay, 10 
Clinton, 1 ; Dekalb, 4 ; Delaware, 6 ; Elkhart, 5 ; Floyd, 2 ; Gibson, 16 ; Grant, 8 ; Green 
54 : Hancock, 1 : Harrison, 1 ; Hendricks, 2 ; Henry, 1 ; Howard, 5 ; Huntington, 3 
Jackson, 4 ; ony, ^ -, Knox, 2 ; Kosciusko, 2 ; Lagrange, 8 ; Lake, 2 ; Laporte, 4 ; Lawrence 
2 ; Madison, 16 ; Marion, 51 ; Martin, 6 ; Montgomery, 1 ; Noble, 11 ; Ohio, 2 ; Orange, 2 
Parke, 1 ; Porter, 2 ; Pulaski, 1 ; Putnam, 1 ; Randolph, 8 ; Spencer, 1 ; Steuben, 1 
Switzerland, 1 ; Tippecanoe, 3 ; Vanderburgh, 10 : Vigo, 7 ; Wabash, 1 ; Wayne, 2. The 
death occurred in Clark County. 

July, 1918 — 156 cases in 30 counties with 3 deaths. The counties reporting smallpox 
present were: Allen, 2; Benton, 7; Blackford, 1; Boone, 1; Cass, 3; Clay, 10; Elkhart, 
6 ; Gibson, 7 ; Grant, 3 ; Hancock, 1 ; Henry, 6 ; Howard, 6 ; Jackson, 2 ; Lagrange, 18 ; 
Lawrence, 12 ; Madison, 9 ; Marion, 33 ; Miami, 1 ; Monroe, 1 ; Montgomery, 2 ; Morgan, 
4 ; Noble, 3 ; Posey, 3 ; Putnam, 2 ; Rush, 3 ; St. Joseph, 1 ; Tippecanoe, 1 ; Vanderburgh, 
2 ; Warren, 3 ; Wayne, 3. The deaths occurred in Hancock, 1 ; Marion, 2. 

August, 1918— 

September, 1918 — 

October, 1918— 

November, 1918 — 

December, 1918 

MONTHLY ANALYSIS OF TUBERCULOSIS 
(As published in the Monthly Bulletin.) 

January, 1918 — 298 deaths, of which 262 are of the pulmonary form and 36 other 
forms. Male tuberculosis deaths numbered 154 ; females, 144. Of the males, 32 were 
married in the age period 18 to 40 and left 64 orphans under 12 years of age. Of the 
females, 74 were married in the same age period as above and left 74 orphans under 12 
years of age. ^ Total number of orphans made in one month by this preventable disease, 
138. Number of homes invaded, 281. 

February, 1918 — 342 deaths, of which 292 were of the pulmonary form, and 50 
other forms. Male tuberculosis deaths numbered 168, females 174. Of the males, 24 were 
married in the age period 18 to 40 and left 48 orphans under 12 years of age. Of the 
females, 61 were married in the same age period as above and left 122 orphans under 
12 years of age. Total number of orphans made in one month by this preventable dis- 
ease, 170. Number of homes invaded, 329. 

March, 1918 — 412 deaths, of which 360 were of the pulmonary form and 52 other 
forms. Male tuberculosis deaths numbered 226 ; females 186. Of the males, 38 were mar- 
ried in the age period 18 to 40 and left 76 orphans under 12 years of age. Of tEe fe- 
males, 70 were married in the same age period as above and left 140 orphans under 12 
years of age. Total number of orphans made in one month by this preventable disease, 
216. Number of homes invaded, 394. 

April, 1918 — 449 deaths, of which 383 were of the pulmonary form and 66 other 
forms. Male tuberculosis deaths numbered 218 ; females 231. Of the males 43 were 
married in the age period 18 to 40 and left 86 orphans under 12 years of age. Of the 
females, 88 were married in the same period as above and left 176 orphans under 12 



\ State Board of Health 385 

years of age. Total number of orphans made in one month by this preventable disease, 
262. Number of homes invaded, 432. 

May, 1918 — 352 deaths, of which 292 were of the pulmonary form and 60 other 
forms. Male tuberculosis deaths numbered 182 ; females, 170. Of the males, 33 were 
married in the age period 18 to 40, and left 66 orphans under 12 years of age. Of the 
females, 54 were married in the same period as above, and left 108 orhans under 12 
years of age. Total number of orphans made in one month by this preventable dis- 
ease, 162. Number of homes invaded, 339. 

June, 1918 — 323 deaths, of which 279 were of the pulmonary form and 44 other 
forms. Male tuberculosis deaths numbered 164, fem.ales 159. Of the males, 32 were 
married in the age period 18 to 40 and left 64 orphans under 12 years of age. Of the 
females, 56 were married in the same age period as above and left 112 orphans under 
12 years of age. Total number of orphans made in one month by this preventable 
176. Number of homes invaded, 306. 



July, 1918 — 274 deaths, of which 233 were of the pulmonary form and 41 other 
forms. Male tuberculosis deaths numbered 120 ; females, 154. Of the males, 32 were 
married in the age period 18 to 40, and left 64 orphans under 12 years of age. Of 
the females, 54 were married in the same age period as above, and left 108 orphans 
under 12 years of age. Total orphans made in one month by this preventable disease, 
172. Number of homes invaded, 261. 

August, 1918 — 

September, 1918— 

October, 1918— 

November, 1918 — 

December, 1918 — 



MONTHLY ANALYSIS OP PNEUMONIA 

(As published in the Monthly Bulletin.) 

January, 1918 — 470 deaths; rate, 190.2 per 100,000. In the preceding month, 335 
deaths ; rate, 136.8. In the same month last year, 607 deaths ; rate, 248. 

February, 1918 — 349 deaths ; rate, 143.8 per 100,000. In the preceding month, 470 
deaths ; rate, 190.2. In the same month last year, 657 deaths ; rate, 296.0. 

March, 1918 — 458 deaths ; rate, 188.7 per 100,000. In the preceding month, 470 
deaths ; rate, 143.8. In the same month last year, 597 deaths ; rate, 243.9. Of the pneu- 
monia deaths, 263 were males, 195 females. Total pneumonia deaths under 1 year, 112. 

April, 1918 — 556 deaths; rate, 229.1 per 100,000. In the preceding month, 458 

deaths ; rate, 188.7. In the same month last year, 349 deaths ; rate, 148.9. Of the 

pneumonia deaths, 315 were males and 241 females. One hundred and eleven were un- 
der 1 year of age, and 31 over 80 years of age. 

May, 1918 — 270 deaths ; rate, 11.3 per 100,000. In the preceding month, 556 deaths ; 
rate, 229.1. In the same month last year, 247 deaths ; rate, 100.6. Of the pneumonia 
deaths, 142 were males and 128 females. , 

June, 1918 — 72 deaths ; rate, 29.7 per 100,000. In the preceding month, 270 deaths ; 
rate, 111.3. In the same month last year, 127 deaths ; rate, 53.4. Males numbered 51 ; 
females, 21. 

July, 1918 — 70 deaths ; rate, 28.8 per 100,000. In the preceding month, 72 deaths ; 
rate, 29.7. In the same month last year, 91 deaths ; rate, 27.1. 

August, 1918— 
September, 1918 — 
October, 1918 
November, 1918 — 
December, 1918 — 



25—13956 



386 Year Book 



MONTHLY ANALYSIS OF TYPHOID FEVER 

(As published in the Monthly Bulletin.) 

January, 1918 — 48 cases in 18 counties, with 17 deaths. In the preceding month, 

47 cases in 20 counties, with 34 deaths. In the same month last year, 130 cases in 21 
counties, with 35 deaths. 

February, 1918—42 cases in 15 counties, with 16 deaths. In the preceding month, 

48 cases in 18 counties, with 17 deaths. In the same month last year, 74 cases in 20 
counties, with 25 deaths. 

March, 1918 — 87 deaths in 23 counties, with 23 deaths. In the preceding month, 42 
cases in 15 counties, with 16 deaths. In the same month last year, 83 cases in 19 
counties, with 22 deaths. 

April, 1918 — 45 cases in 22 counties, with 26 deaths. In the preceding month 87 
cases in 23 counties, with 23 deaths. In the same month last year, 89 cases in 20 
counties, with 15 deaths. 

May, 1918 — 64 cases in 25 counties, with 19 deaths. In the preceding month 45 cases 
in 22 counties, with 26 deaths. In the same month last year 71 cases in 19 counties, 
with 22 deaths. 

June, 1918 — 74 cases in 25 counties, Tvith 22 deaths. In the preceding month, 64 
cases in 25 counties, with 19 deaths. In the same month last year, 60 cases in 21 
counties, with 23 deaths. 

July 1918 — 84 cases in 39 counties, with 23- deaths. In the preceding month, 74 
cases in 25 counties, with 22 deaths. In the same month last year, 131 cases in 40 
counties, with 32 deaths. 

August,' 1918— 

September, 1918 — 

October, 1918— 

November, 1918 — 

December, 1918 — 

MONTHLY ANALYSIS OF DIPHTHERIA. 

(As published in the Monthly Bulletin.) 

January, 1918 — 382 cases in 52 counties, with 65 deaths. In the preceding month, 
530 cases in 57 counties, with 63 deaths. In the same month last yeear, 409 cases in 58 
counties, with 46 deaths. 

February, 1918 — 334 cases reported in 49 counties, with 45 deaths. In the preceding 
month, 382 cases in 52 counties, with 65 deaths. In the same month last year, 257 
cases in 47 counties, with 31 deaths. 

March, 1918 — 301 cases in 47 counties, with 42 deaths. In the preceding month, 
334 cases reported in 49 counties, with 45 deaths. In the same month last year, 235 
cases in 44 counties, with 31 deaths. 

April, 1918 — 264 cases in 44 counties, with 47 deaths. In the preceding month, 
301 cases in 47 counties, with 42 deaths. In the same month last year 193 cases in 46 
counties, with 33 deaths. 

May, 1918 — 201 cases in 37 counties, with 25 deaths. In the preceding month, 264 
cases in 44 counties, with ¥1 deaths. In the same month last year, 197 cases in 39 
counties, with 24 deaths. 

June, 1918 — 155 cases in 32 counties, with 14 deaths. In the preceding month, 201 
cases in 37 counties, with 25 deaths. In the same month last year, 150 cases in 41 
counties, with 19 deaths, 

July, 1918 — 176 cases in 38 counties, with 21 deaths. In the preceding month, 155 
cases in 32 counties, with 14 deaths. In the same month last year, 153 cases in 30 
counties, with 23 deaths. 

August, 1918 — 

September, 1918 — 

October, 1918— 

November, 1918 — 

December, 1918— ^ 



State Board of Health 887 

monthly analysis of scarlet fever 

(As published in Monthly Bulletin.) 

January, 1918 — 694 cases in 67 counties, with 22 deaths. In the preceding month, 
794 cases in 68 counties, with 14 deaths. In the same month last year, 490 cases in 58 
counties, with 13 deaths. 

February, 1918 — 593 cases reported in 58 counties, with 17 deaths. In the pre- 
ceding month, 694 cases in 67 counties, with 22 deaths. In the same month last year, 
548 cases in 52 counties, with 16 deaths. 

March, 1918 — 557 cases reported in 55 counties, with 18 deaths. In the preceding 
month, 598 cases in 58 counties, with 17 deaths. In the same month last year, 544 
cases in 55 counties, with 16 deaths. 

April, 1918 — 500 cases in 51 counties, with 17 deaths. In the preceding month, 557 
cases in 55 counties, with 18 deaths. In the some month last year, 543 cases in 57 
counties, with 18 deaths. 

May, 1918 — 291 cases in 37 counties, with 10 deaths. In the preceding month, 500 
cases in 51 counties, with 17 deaths. In the same month last year, 443 cases in 51 
counties, with 25 deaths. 

June, 1918 — ^159 cases in 34 counties, with 6 deaths. In the preceding month, 291 
cases in 37 counties, with 10 deaths. In the same month last year, 203 cases in 39 
counties, with 10 deaths. 

July, 1918 — 89 cases in 28 counties, with no deaths. In the preceding month, 159 
cases in 34 counties, with 6 deaths. In the same month last year, 129 cases in 27 
counties, with 5 deaths. 

August, 1918— 

September, 1918— 

October, 1918— 

November, 1918 — 

December, 1918 — 

MONTHLY ANALYSIS OF MEASLES 
(As published in Monthly Bulletin.) 

January, 1918 — 820 cases in 64 counties, with 8 deaths. In the preceding month, 
277 cases in 38 counties, with 3 deaths. In the same month last year, 4,145 cases in 72 
counties, with 32 deaths. 

February, 1918 — 1,370 cases in 68 counties, with 12 deaths. In the preceding month, 
820 cases in 64 counties, with 8 deaths. In the same month last year, 5,353 cases in 79 
counties, with 74 deaths. 

March, 1918 — 1,241 cases in 65 counties, with 20 deaths. In the preceding month, 
1,370 cases in 68 counties, with 12 deaths. In the same month last year, 7,332 cases 
in 78 counties, with 141 deaths. 

April, 1918 — 833 cases in 57 counties, with 29 deaths. In the preceding month, 
1,241 cases in 65 counties, with 20 deaths. In the same month last year, 7,288 cases in 
80 counties, with 149 deaths. 

May, 1918 — 634 cases in 46 counties, with 26 deaths. In the preceding month, 833 
cases in 57 counties, with 29 deaths. In the same month last year, 3,908 cases in 74 
counties, with 91 deaths. 

June, 1918 — 304 cases in 33 counties, with 13 deaths. In the preceding month, 634 
cases in 46 counties, with 26 deaths. In the same month last year, 1,283 cases in 59 
counties, with 33 deaths. 

July, 1918 — 63 cases in 23 counties, with 2 deaths. In the preceding month, 304 
cases in 33 counties, with 13 deaths. In the same month last year, 249 cases in 83 
counties, with 12 deaths. 

August, 1918 — 

September, 1918— 

October, 1918— 

November, 1918 — 

December, 1918 — 



388 Year Book 

monthly analysis of poliomyelitis 

(As published in Monthly Bulletin.) 

January, 1918 — 6 cases in 4 counties, with 2 deaths. In the preceding month, 1 
case and 1 death. In the same month last year, 4 cases in 4 counties, with 4 deaths. 

February, 1918 — 2 cases in 2 counties, with no deaths. In the preceding month, 6 
cases in 4 counties, with 2 deaths. In the sg,me month last year, 4 cases in 3 counties, 
with 2 deaths. 

March, 1918 — 4 cases reported in 3 counties, with 2 deaths. In the preceding month, 
2 cases in 2 counties, with no deaths. In the same month last year, 3 cases in 2 
counties, with 1 death. 

April, 1918 — 1 case in 1 county, with 1 death. In the preceding month, 4 cases in 3 
counties, with 2 deaths. In the same month last year, 3 cases in 2 counties, with 4 
deaths. 

May, 1918 — 3 cases in 3 counties, with 2 deaths. In the preceding month, 1 case in 
1 county, with 1 death. In the same month last year, 1 case in 1 county, with 2 deaths. 

June, 1918 — 5 cases in 2 counties, with 5 deaths. In the preceding month, 3 cases 
in 3 counties, with 2 deaths. In the same month last year, 5 cases in 4 counties, with 3 
deaths. 

July, 1918 — 11 cases in 8 counties, with 2 deaths. In the preceding month, 5 cases 
in 2 counties, with 5 deaths. In the same month last year, 5 'cases in 4 counties, with 6 
deaths. 

August, 1918 — 

September, 1918 — 

October, 1918— 

November, 1918 — 

December, 1918 — 

MONTHLY ANALYSIS OF EXTERNAL CAUSES 
(As published in Monthly Bulletin.) 

January, 1918 — Total, 156 ; males, 106 ; females, 50. 

Suicides : Total, 18 ; males, 10 ; females, 8. Suicide by poison, 9 ; by hanging or 
strangulation, 2 ; by firearms, 4 ; by cutting or piercing instruments, 2 ; by jumping 
from high places, 1. 

Accidental or Undefined: Total, 131; males, 90; females, 41. Poisoning by food, 
4; other acute poisonings, 4; conflagration, 1; burns (conflagration excepted), 22; 
absorption of deleterious gases, 10 ; accidental drowning, 1 ; traumatism by firearms, 3 ; 
traumatism by fall, 25 ; traumatism in mines, 5 ; traumatism by machines, 2 ; traumatism 
by other crushing, 4 ; railroad accidents and injuries, 23 ; street car accidents and in- 
juries, 5 ; automobile accidents and injuries, 8 ; injuries by animals, 1 ; starvation, 1 ; 
excessive cold, 6 ; electricity (lightning excepted), 1 ; other external violence, 5. 

Homicide : Total, 7 ; males, 6 ; females, 1. Homicide by firearms, 3 ; homcide by 
cutting or piercing instruments, 2 ; homicide by other means, 2. 

February, 1918— Total, 203. Males, 146 ; females, 57. 

Suicide: Total, 27. Males, 22; females, 5. Suicide by poison, 10; by hanging or 
strangulation, 6 ; drowning, 1 ; by firearms, 9 ; by cutting or piercing instruments, 1. 

Accidental or Undefined: Total, 168. Males, 117; females, 51. Poisoning by food, 
6 ; other acute poisonings, 7 ; conflagration, 4 ; burns (conflagration excepted) , 20 ; 
absorption of deleterious gases (conflagration excepted), 2; accidental drowning, 2; 
traumatism by firearms, 5 ; traumatism by fall, 42 ; traumatism in mines, 8 ; traumatism 
by machines, 9 ; traumatism by other crushing, 5 ; railroad accidents and injuries, 31 ; 
street car accidents and injuries, 5 ; automobile accidents and injuries, 6 ; motorcycles, 1 ; 
injuries by animals, 5 ; starvation, 1 ; excessive cold, 2 ; effects of heat, 1 ; other external 
violence, 6. 

Homicide : Total, 8. Males, 7 ; females, 1 ; homicide by firearms, 6 ; by cutting or 
piercing instruments, 1 ; by other means, 1. 

March, 1918— Total, 236. Males, 169 ; females, 67. 

Suicide : Total, 33. Males, 25 ; females, 8. Suicide by poison, 9 ; by hanging or 



State Board of Health 389 

strangulation, 2 ; by drowning, 4 ; by firearms, 15 ; by cutting or piercing instruments, 

2 ; by crushing, 1. 

Accidental or Undefined: Total, 194. Males, 135; females, 59. Poisoning by food, 
8; other acute poisonings, 3; conflagration, 3; burns (conflagration excepted), 21; 
absorption of deleterious gases (conflagration excepted), 5; accidental drowning, 6; 
traumatism by firearms, 2 ; traumatism by fall, 45 ; traumatism in mines, 9 ; traumatism 
by machines, 3 ; traumatism by other crushing, 1 ; railroad accidents and injuries, 41 ; 
street car accidents and injuries, 5 ; automobile accidents and injuries, 18 ; injuries by 
animals, 4; starvation, 1; excessive cold, 1; electricity (lightning excepted), 2; other 
external violence, 16. 

Homicide: Total, 9. Males, 9. Homicide by firearms, 7 ; homicide by other means, 2. 

April, 1918— Total, 207. Males, 148 ; females, 59. 

Suicide: Total, 34. Males, 26; females, 8. Suicide by poison, 10; by asphyxia, 1; 
by hanging or strangulation, 5 ; by drowning, 3 ; by firearms, 12 ; by cutting or piercing 
instruments, 3. 

Accidental or Undefined: Total, 164. Males, 114; females, 50. Poisoning by food, 

3 ; other acute poisonings, 8 ; bums (conflagration excepted), 18 ; absorption of deleterious 
gases (conflagration excepted), 4; accidental drowning, 2; traumatism by firearms, 1; 
traumatism by cutting instruments, 1 ; traumatism by fall, 38 ; traumatism in mines, 5 ; 
traumatism by machine, 6 ; traumatism by other crushings, 7 ; railroad accidents and 
injuries, 27 ; street car accidents and injuries, 2 ; automobile accidents and injuries, 20 ; 
motorcycles, 3; injuries by animals, 2; electricity (lightning excepted), 3; other external 
violence, 14. 

Homicide: Total, 9. Males, 8; females, 1. Homicide by firearms, 8; by other 
means, 1. 

May, 1918— Total, 198. Males, 144; females, 54. 

Suicide: Total, 31. Males, 25; females, 6. Suicide by poison, 6; by asphyxia, 1; 
by hanging or strangulation, 8 ; by drowning, 3 ; by firearms, 11 ; by cutting or piercing 
instrioments, 2. 

Accidental or Undefined: Total, 164. Males, 117; females, 47. Poisoning by food, 

1 ; other acute poisonings, 6 ; conflagration, 2 ; burns (conflagration excepted) , 9 ; 
absorption of deleterious gases (conflagration excepted), 1; accidental drowning, 19; 
traumatism by firearms, 3 ; traumatism by fall, 27 ; traumatism in mines, 7 ; traumatism 
by machines, 7 ; railroad accidents and injuries, 32 ; automobile accidents and injuries, 
22 ; motorcycles, 2 ; injuries by animals, 7 ; starvation, 2 ; effects of heat, 1 ; lightning, 
2 ; electricity (lightning excepted) , 6 ; other external violence, 8. 

Homicide: Total, 3. Males, 2; females, 1; homicide by firearms, 3. 

June, 1918— Total, 268. Males, 212 ; females, 56. 

Suicides : Total, 26. Males, 20 ; females, 6. Suicide by poison, 5 ; by asphyxia, 1 ; 
by hanging or strangulation, 7 ; by drowning, 1 ; by firearms, 10 ; by cutting or piercing 
instruments, 2. 

Accidental or Undefined: Total, 230. Males, 185; females, 45. Poisoning by food, 

2 ; other acute poisonings, 1 ; burns (conflagration excepted), 14 ; absorption of deleterious 
gases (conflagration excepted), 1; accidental drowning, 21; traumatism by firearms, 2; 
traumatism by fall, 34 ; traumatism in mines, 10 ; traumatism by machines, 4 ; traumatism 
by other crushing, 5 ; railroad accidents and injuries, 81 ; street car accidents and injuries, 

4 ; automobile accidents and injuries, 20 ; injuries by other vehicles, 2 ; motorcycles, 2 ; 
injuries by animals, 9 ; effects of heat, 1 ; lightning, 1 ; electricity (lightning excepted) , 
7 ; other external violence, 9. 

Homicide : Total, 12. Males, 7 ; females, 5. Homicide by firearms, 7 ; by cutting 
or piercing instruments, 2 ; by other means, 3. 

July, 1918— Total, 261. Males, 190; females, 71. 

Suicide : Total, 34. Males, 21 ; females, 13. Suicide by poison, 11 ; by asphyxia, 2 ; 
by hanging or strangulation, 9 ; by drowning, 3 ; by firearms, 8 ; by cutting or piercing 
instruments, 1. 

Accidental or Undefined : Total, 222. Males, 164 ; females, 58. Poisoning by food, 

3 ; other acute poisonings, 5 ; burns (conflagration excepted), 10 ; absorption of deleterious 
gases (conflagration excepted) , 5 ; accidental drowning, 39 ; traumatism by firearms, 8 ; 
traumatism by fall, 33 ; traumatism in mines, 20 ; traumatism by machines, 3 : railroad 
accidents and injuries, 39 ; street car accidents and injuries, 2 ; automobile accidents 
and injuries, 20 ; injuries by other vehicles, 1 ; landslide, other crushings, 5 ; bicycles, 2 ; 



390 Year Book 

motorcycles, 2 ; injuries by animals, 11 ; starvation, 1 ; effects of heat, 2 ; lightning, 
2; electricity (lightning excepted), 4; other external violence, 5. 

Homicide: Total, 5. Males, 5. Homicide by firearms, 3; by cutting or piercing 
instruments, 1 ; by other means, 1. 

August, 1918 — 

September, 1918— 

October, 1918— 

November, 1918 — 

December, 1918— 

BIRTHS 

Total number of births reported in the State during the year 1917 
was 63,073. Males numbered 32,770; females, 30,303. Of the males, 
32,142 were white and 628 colored. Of the females, 29,729 were white 
and 574 colored. Stillbirths numbered 2,002; males 1,138 white, and 45 
colored; females 864 white, and 44 colored. Illegitimate births numbered 
873; males 469, females 404. 

MARRIAGES 

Total marriages reported 36,811. This is an increase of 3,290 over 
the previous year. 

DEATHS 

Total number of deaths 39,785; rate 13.7. In the preceding year 
38,249; rate 13.3. Males numbered 21,562; females 18,223. White num- 
bered 37,614; colored 2,171. Of the deaths, 14,097 were single; 15,995 
were married and 9,693 widowed. Americans numbered 35,852; foreign 
3,933. 



State Board of Health 391 

THIRTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF THE CHEMICAL DIVISION 
OF THE LABORATORY OF HYGIENE 

H. E. BARNARD, Ph.D., Chemist, 

Indiana State Board of Health, 

State Food and Drug Commissioner, 

Commissioner of Weights and Measures. 

laboratory staff 
H. E. BISHOP, Food Chemist. 
*J. C. DIGGS, Water Chemist. 
WM. D. McABEE, Drug Chemist. 
I. L. MILLER, Food Chemist. 
E. C. HELWIG, Ass't Chemist. 

INSPECTION STAFF 

A. W. BRUNER. F. W. TUCKER. 

B. W. COHN. J. T. WILLETT. 

C. L. HUTCHENS. C. V. STAINSBY. 

RICHARD WHITE. 

OFFICE STAFF 
EDITH L. HOFFMAN. MARY V. CANNON. 

RESUME OF WORK 

This, the Thirteenth Annual Report of the Food, Drug and Water 
Laboratories of the State Board of Health and the Ninth Annual Re- 
port of the activities of the Sanitary Inspectors, presents herewith a 
brief summary of the activities of the several branches of the depart- 
ment. 

During the past year the work of the food and drug laboratories has 
been directed chiefly to the enforcement of the laws against adulteration 
of staple foods and drugs particularly subject to sophistication because 
of the scarcity of supplies due to the unusual demands of war times. 
The enforced program of wheat conservation compelled the use of a 
great variety of wheat substitutes. Many dealers, failing to secure the 
approved grains and cereals with which to supply purchasers of wheat 
flour, have, on occasion, offered for sale for human food, packaged 
goods damaged by insects, and flours mouldy or otherwise unfit for con- 
sumption. 

The high price of all meats has tempted dealers to sell diseased 
meats; to offer cheap meats, such as goat meat, for the more valuable 
sorts; to compound lards without declaring the fact; to sophisticate 
sausages; indeed to resort to every device to reduce prices and increase 
profits. 

These practices, illegal in peace times, and doubly to be deplored in 
this period of war, have been suppressed by inspection, by the efficient 
control of local food officials and as well by prosecutions based on the 
analytical data provided by our chemists. 

♦Lieut. John]C. Diggs, Sanitary Corps, U. S. Army, 



392 Year Book 

Of particular interest has been the control of the quality and char- 
acter of the soft drinks popularized by the taking effect of the pro- 
hibitory statutes enacted by the General Assembly of 1916-17.. 

Many cases involving the sale of mislabelled beers, which though 
labelled as non-alcoholic were in fact genuine beers or beers containing 
more than the legal alcoholic limit, have been successfully prosecuted in 
the courts. This necessary work, although essentially a function of the 
law enforcement agencies of cities and counties, will be continued with 
vigor. 

The action of Herbert Hoover, U. S. Food Administrator, in placing 
the work of the administration of Indiana in the hands of the State Food 
and Drug Commissioner has necessarily, to a considerable degree, in- 
terrupted the normal activities of our departments. The conservation 
of food, its proper utilization in nutrition, its continued equable distri- 
bution, is the definite purpose of the laboratories, and whatever has 
been done in controlling the food supply of the State has been equally 
of benefit to our own people and to the larger group beyond our borders. 

During the last half year, the analytical work of the food and drug 
laboratories has been seriously hampered by the reconstruction of the 
basement of the State House. This work, so necessary to the proper 
utilization of the waste rooms, and the lighting and ventilation of all 
departments housed in basement rooms, has from the time of its inception 
made accurate chemical work impossible. And as the work progressed 
and our rooms were taken over, the chemical departments were com- 
pelled to stop all work save that which could be carried out with the 
help of the chemists of the city of Indianapolis and the Indianapolis 
Water Company. 

The laboratories, equipped in 1905, and operated constantly since 
that time, perhaps as efficiently as any food and drug control laboratories 
in the world, will be back in their reconstructed quarters in the fall of 
1918 under incomparably better conditions for satisfactory work, both 
as to equipment and the surroundings necessary to the maintenance of 
the health of chemists and clerks. 

REPORT OF THE FOOD LABORATORY 

No detailed report of analytical results is attempted, for the work 
has been so constantly interrupted by unusual conditions, forced by the 
necessity for turning over to chemists and inspectors the organization 
of several departments of the U. S. Food Administration, and later the 
reconstruction work which compelled the abandonment of the laboratories 
to masons, carpenters and painters. 

We have, in spite of these conditions, continued our analytical control 
of the character of the milk supply; our studies of the composition of 
vinegars; our search for illegal drugs, such as saccharin in soft drinks. 

A special study has been made of war bread formulas, both with 
respect to the character of the loaf and the availability of the ingredi- 
ents. Many samples of canned goods, such as hominy, beans, cherries, 
peaches and tomato products have been analyzed to determine their fit- 
ness for food. Stocks found unfit for use have been destroyed, those 
merely off color or unattractive by reason of age have been approved 
for i;se, 



State Board of Health 393 

The unusual conditions affecting the food supply and particularly the 
need for the use of substitutes will make food control during the years 
following the war even more necessary than in the past. Old rules have 
been broken, stable methods changed over night, even business morals dis- 
torted under the pressing need for food. To bring all the factors which 
enter into the production and distribution of food back to the even and 
regular conditions of pre-war times will necessitate the most stringent 
enforcement of our present efficient laws. To that end the laboratories 
of the State Board of Health will lend every energy. 

REPORT OF THE DRUG LABORATORY 

No industry has felt more seriously the paralyzing effect of war than 
the drug industry. Drug staples are prepared from crude drugs gath- 
ered from every corner of the world or compounded from synthetic prod- 
ucts from the chemical laboratories. With the crude drug supply al- 
most completely cut off, and with most chemicals out of the market or 
priced at extraordinary figures, even standard pharmaceuticals have 
been hard to prepare. In consequence, the quality of many drugs has 
suffered, and substitutes have taken the place of many preparations 
that were once standard. The result has been that many nostrums are 
no longer manufactured and that fewer remedies are offered the public 
than for years. But the adulteration and substitution of medicines, both 
manufactured and in crude forms, is more common than in pre-war 
times and the need for state control is great. 

The drug laboratories have given much time to the analysis of the 
so-called standard pharmaceuticals, but even more to the analysis of 
unknown samples sent in by inquiring physicians or persons afflicted 
with a germanophobia that suspects germs in every package of court 
plaster, glass in every slice of gritty bread, and poison in every un- 
identified package of food or bottle of medicine. It is needless to say 
that our analyses of the scores of samples submitted has in most cases 
revealed nothing unusual. Court plasters have shown a bacterial con- 
tent, sometimes dangerous, but never definitely the result of German 
viciousness; bread samples, baking powders, breakfast foods, cocoa and 
dozens of powdered foods have shown no glass, but instead, sand, flinty 
seed coverings and other abnormal but still harmless foreign material. 
In one case a loaf of bread did contain glass particles so inserted as 
conclusively to prove that they were added for bad business reasons, in- 
stead of the baker who would use Hun-like methods to kill off his cus- 
tomers. 

The usual number of viscera taken from suspected poison victims 
has been analyzed. Several cases of definite poisoning with strychnine 
or arsenic have been found and chemical evidence given in the courts by 
the chemists of the department. 

REPORT OF THE SANITARY INSPECTION SERVICE 

The necessity for a perfected control of the sanitation of all food 
producing and distributing establishments has been greater this past 
year than ever. The rapid growth of cities and towns due to the estab- 
lishment of cantonments or war industries has compelled the opening of 
new restaurants and bakeries and the employment of untrained help. 



394 Year Book 

The federalizing of larger districts contiguous to army camps has given 
our inspectors a more perfect control over sanitary conditions than ex- 
isted in peace times and with their induction into the Public Health Serv- 
ice, larger powers than they have enjoyed as state officials. 

The enforcement of the Food Control law, as a function of the Food 
and Drug Department, has enabled us for the first time to exercise a 
definite control over bakeries and restaurants. Every bakeshop using 
more than three barrels of flour a month is licensed and makes a weekly 
report of its work to the Food Administration. Every hotel and restau- 
rant proprietor is required each month to file a report showing the 
amount of flour, flour substitutes and sugar used and the number of 
patrons served. In addition to the required reports, the U. S. Food Ad- 
ministration is employing expert bakery and restaurant inspectors who 
work under the State Food Commissioner and thus supplement the 
regular inspection force and make the sanitary control of these food in- 
dustries more efficient than ever. The duties of our inspectors are con- 
stantly increasing, and the results. of their constructive work are every 
year the more apparent. The desire of the department to make the 
sanitary condition of every food industry in the State second to none 
has been amply fulfilled. 

THE WATER AND SEWAGE DEPARTMENT 

The work of the Water and Sewage Department has of necessity 
been carried out along slightly different lines during the past year, par- 
ticularly during the summer months. While the number of samples 
analyzed, both chemical and bacteriological, seemingly indicate a decrease 
in the amount of work done, yet in reality it represents more. It has 
been necessary to give up a large part of the laboratory space required 
for the analytical work to the Federal Food Administration in the prose- 
cution of its war work. In June the laboratories were completely dis- 
mantled to allow for the remodeling of the department quarters in the 
basement of the State House. The analytical work was continued 
through the courtesy of the Indianapolis Water Company, whose of- 
ficials kindly made room for the work of the State Board of Health in 
their laboratories at the company's filter plant. It is desired to make 
special mention of the assistance rendered by H. E. Jordon, Superinten- 
dent, and C. K. Calvert, who superseded Mr. Jordon as superintendent 
when he entered th